Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

“The material covered in LSSU's engineering program provided me a solid foundation for graduate studies. The systematic approach and communication skills needed to tackle engineering projects were taught and then practiced over and over again. In particular I appreciate the many hours spent by the faculty to develop oral presentation skills in each student. As a graduate student now, these skills have proven to be highly beneficial and, to my surprise, obviously not taught to the same extent at many other universities.”

Mark Reese, Mechanical Engineering 2005
Hawaii Natural Energy Institute
School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology
Graduate Student, University of Hawaii at Manoa

College of Arts, Letters, Social Sciences and Emergency Services

School of Communication Studies and the Fine & Performing Arts

Fine Arts Studies Department

Major Productions

At the Mercy of Ruin *
2011
Spring
Times' Up (from All in the Timing) +
2011
Spring
Coppelia, a comedic ballet
2011
Spring
Icarus
2010
Fall
Romeo and Juliet
2010
Spring
Running for the Storm Cellar from Escaping Tornado Season *
2009
Fall
You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown
2009
Spring
Relationships *
2008
Fall
Proud Monster *
2008
Spring
The Diviners
2008
Spring
Lemonade and I'm Herbert
2007
Fall
Modern Martyr *
2007
Spring
Macbeth
2007
Spring
The Glass Menagerie
2006
Fall
Incident at Thompson Slough and Other Stories *
2006
Fall
The Vagina Monologues +
2006
Spring
A Small, Good Thing *
2006
Spring
Body My House
2006
Spring
No Exit +
2005
Spring
Elliot Enacted *
2004
Fall
The Fantasticks
2004
Spring
Agnes of God
2003
Fall
Silver Voices *
2003
Spring
The Vagina Monologues +
2003
Spring
Shades and Shadows of Violence *
2002
Fall
Talking With
2002
Spring
Our Town
2002
Spring
Greater Tuna
2001
Spring
Canadian Gothic
2000
Fall

* denotes original scripting and adaptation
+ denotes student-directed and -designed productions

 

 

Investigat- ing the Use of QPCR: An Early Detection Method for Toxic Cyano- bacterial Bloom

Garrett Aderman

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), including cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs), are a global phenomenon. In the US, annual economic loss due to HABs was recently estimated at $82 million. Furthermore, the consensus amongst the scientific community is that the frequency and duration of CHABs in freshwater systems will increase as a result of climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. Due to the ability of some strains of CHAB genera to produce toxic compounds, larger and more sustained CHAB events will become an even greater threat to drinking water. Of all the known cyantoxoins, one of the most ubiquitous is microcystin (MCY). Humans are primarily exposed to cyantoxins through drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. The increasing risk presented by these toxins requires health officials and utilities to improve their ability to track the occurrence and relative toxicity. Current tracking methods do not distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains. Biochemical techniques for analyzing the toxins are showing considerable potential as they are relatively simple to run and low cost. My goal was to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to measure the amount of mcyE gene in a Lake Erie drinking water and compare the levels of the mcyE to toxin produced. This is the first step to determining if the presence of mcyE of the mycrocystin synthestase gene cluster in Microcystits, Planktothrix and Anabaena cells can be used as the quantitative measurement in an early detection warning system for recreational and drinking waters.

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