EN 180: Introduction to Literary Studies
MWF 11:00-11:50

 


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Office: KJS Library 301
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:50; and by appointment
Office Phone: 635-2378
E-mail Address: adoughty@ lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts:
Foster, Thomas. How to Read Literature Like a Professor. New York: Quill, 2003.
Shakespeare, William. Henry IV, Part 1. New York: Washington Square P, 1994.
Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Norton Critical Edition. New York: Norton, 1996.
Packet of readings, on reserve at the KJS Library (some of the texts also available online).

(Please note that you must buy the versions of Frankenstein and Henry IV, Part 1 listed here; I have chosen these editions for a reason.)

Course Description and Goals:

Catalog Description: This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of literary study, focusing on three questions: What is a literary text? How do we read a literary text? How do we write about a literary text? Addressing these questions requires students to examine the social and cultural contexts of literature and its aesthetic, rhetorical, and ideological aspects. These considerations will help students judge literary value and examine their own literary assumptions. Requires one research project and critical essays using MLA style. Prerequisite: EN111.

Course Policies:
Attendance Policy: Being absent is not an excuse for missing an assignment. It is your responsibility to keep up with your own attendance. If you know in advance that you will miss a class, see me beforehand, or call or e-mail me. You are responsible for all course work, whether you are present in class or not. Your daily quizzes will indicate your attendance, and you are responsible for arranging to make up any quizzes you miss. You will have one week to make up quizzes, and if you do not make them up within that time frame, you will receive a zero on the quiz. If you are late to class, you will not be allowed to make up the quiz.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is small, it is important that everyone has something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments: Each assignment will be worth 20% of your final grade.

·         Journal and Quizzes: Each Monday, starting 15 September, you will be required to submit a journal discussing one of the readings from the past week. The journals need to focus on analyzing the text you choose. DO NOT give a plot summary of the text. Rather, talk about its literary merit—character, narrative, theme, etc.—using the class discussions and readings in How to Read Literature Like a Professor as a guideline. Be specific in your analysis, and bring in specific examples from the text to support your points. Each journal should be 2-3 pages long. In addition to the journals, you will be responsible for taking reading quizzes. These quizzes will cover the packet readings assigned to accompany the Foster book and will focus on factual plot elements (i.e. what happened).

·         4 Papers: You will write 2 papers as we work through the Foster book, as well as a paper about Henry IV, Part 1 and Frankenstein. The specific assignments will be handed out as the class progresses.


Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting. That means no cover page for papers. Include a Works Cited Page for each text that you discuss in you papers. Any good handbook will have MLA format in it. I will be happy to help you if you have any questions about the formatting.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper grade. For every 5 different grammar and mechanical errors on your papers (including MLA formatting), you will lose one letter grade. Take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Disability Services and Accommodations for Students: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of class, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in South Hall Office 206. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.

Background from Backgrounds Archive


EN 222.001: English Grammar
MWF
9:00-9:50, CAS 107

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty
Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: M-F 10:00-10:50 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Text and Materials:

Kolln, Martha, and Robert Funk. Understanding English Grammar. 6th ed. Toronto: Longman, 2002.
Lined paper and pens of two different colors (one neither black nor blue).

Recommended Texts:

Kiester, Jane Bell. Caught'ya: Grammar with a Giggle. Gainsville, FL: Maupin House, 2001. [particularly recommended for future elementary teachers]
Noguchi, Rei R. Grammar and the Teaching of Writing: Limits and Possibilities. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1991. [particularly recommended for future high school and college teachers]

Course Description:
Catalog Description: Introduction to the basic Standard English grammar, its vocabulary and its principles as these rules apply to the structure of the sentence and the production of the meaning.

Translation: We're going to examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with types of sentences, we will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. We will also examine how to integrate grammar (and mechanics) into the elementary and high school classroom by modeling a specific technique.

Course Requirements:
Attendance:
You are expected to attend class and to be prepared to discuss the assigned reading. Because the content of this course is cumulative, chronic absences will be difficult to overcome. If you are unable to come to class, it is your responsibility to make up the work you missed and to get notes from a classmate.

Class Discussions: I like to make my courses student-centered, so I try to limit lectures. There will be times that I need to present materials in lecture format, but you are always welcome to ask questions as they occur to you. I will also try to spend a significant amount of time on classroom activities and exercises to help you better understand the grammatical terms and concepts that you are reading about. I expect everyone's full participation in each activity, including board work, though I do not expect perfection in class. Do not be afraid to make mistakes (or to answer if you think you might be wrong) because you cannot learn without making mistakes.

Assignments: Each assignment is worth 20% of your final grade:

·         Weekly Caught'ya Assignments and Miscellany: I will be modeling a method for teaching grammar and mechanics in the classroom called Caught'ya (see recommended text). Starting on Friday, 3 September, you will come to class and copy the sentence(s) on the board onto a sheet of paper, correcting the grammatical and mechanical errors you see in them as you do so. I will come around the room and try to "catch" you missing these errors. After a couple minutes, as a class we will go over the sentence and you will make any corrections you missed in a different color pen (only one pen used may be black or blue) and mark the number of errors in the left margin. Each Friday, I will collect the Caught'ya paper (you will do all of a week's sentences on the same page) and grade it based on whether you have marked your sentences correctly (and followed the assigned formatting for the paper). In addition to the Caught'ya assignment, I may choose to assign homework, in-class work, and/or quizzes in class as I deem necessary.

·         4 Exams: You will have 4 exams throughout the course of the semester, and you can expect each exam to be comprehensive.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Student Accommodations and Support Services: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of classes, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in the Library 101. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.

Background from Backgrounds Archive


EN233-001 English Literature I--Fall 99

MWF 11:00-11:50, CAS 211

Dr. Gadzinski, Library 319, Phone: 635-2115

Office Hours: T 12:00-5:00, and by appt.

 

Text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1, 6th ed.

 

Note to Education students:  This course addresses the criteria of the Education program for preparation of English language arts teachers in the knowledge of language, literature, written composition, the reading process, ways of responding to literature, and an understanding of British literature from the 11th to the 18th Centuries, including works that reflect ethnic diversity.

 

Schedule:

 

Aug.  30  Introduction

Sept.   1  The OE period

           3   Background on Beowulf, Norton 2-5, 14-15, 21-26,

 

           8  Beowulf (handout) ll. 1-836.............Group 1

         10  ll. 837-1250...................……….......Group 2

 

        13  ll. 1251-1650..................……..........Group 3

        15  ll. 651-1887....................………......Group 4

        17  ll. 1888-2199, ll. 2200-2541..….......Group 5

 

         20 ll. 2542-2723....................………....Group 6

         22 ll. 2724-2891...................…….…....Group 7

         24 ll. 2892-3182...............……............Group 8 

               

         27 Test Review 

         29 Test   

Oct.    1  The ME period, Norton 5-14 

 

           4 Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, Norton 76-81   

           6  General Prologue..................….....Group 1 

           8  Miller's Prologue and Tale.............Group 2 

 

         11 Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale....Group 3, 4

         13  Pardoner's Prologue and Tale........Group 5 

         15 Nun's Priest's Tale...............….......Group 6

 

       


          18  Tale of Sir Thopas (handout), Parson's Tale and                                                                                                  Retraction..........................……...Group 7, 8 

           20  Test Review 

           22  Test 

 

25  The 16th C., Norton 395-413

27  Shakespeare, Norton 801-3, Sonnet 18..Group 1

                29  Sonnets 73, 130………………..Group 2, 3

 

Nov.      1 1 Henry IV, Act 1........................Group 4    

                  3  1 Henry IV, Act 2………............Group 5

                  5  1 Henry IV, Act 3........................Group 6  PAPER A DUE

                  

  8  1 Henry IV, Act 4........................Group 7

                10  1 Henry IV, Act 5........................Group 8

                12  The Early 17th C., Norton 1069-79

 

                15  John Donne, Norton 1080-2, The Sun Rising, A       Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,                     Holy Sonnets 10, 14......................Group 1

17      Francis Bacon, Norton 1257-8, Of Truth, Of Marriage and Single Life..Group 2

19      Of  Superstition, Of Studies (1625 version), The Abuses of Language....Group 3

                                 

             22  John Milton, Norton 1433-5, Lycidas......Group 4

                 

             29  Paradise Lost, Book 1....................Group 5

Dec.           1  The Restoration and 18th C., Norton 1767-85

3  Jonathan Swift, Norton 2007-9, A Description of a City Shower, A Modest                    Proposal.………………................Group 6, 7

 

                  6  Alexander Pope, Norton 2212-6, The Rape of the Lock.....Group 8

                  8  Test Review

                 10  PAPER B DUE

 

                 13  Final Exam, 10:00-12:00


COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

Your grade will be based on attendance and participation, 3 tests, 4 group reports, and 2 individual papers:

 

4 group reports.....................(@ 6.25%)= 25%

2 individual papers........... .....(@ 15%)  = 30%

2 tests.............................(@12.5%) = 25%

Final Exam.....................................20%

Attendance, Part., Prep.........................x%

 

Attendance, Participation, and Preparation

 

We have a lot of material to cover and need the benefit of your questions and insights.  Be here.  I will take roll.  If you can't make class, notify me in advance and I'll be happy to catch you up.  Absences will become an issue if you make them one.

 

The course has made an effort to keep the reading load manageable. Do the reading and be prepared to talk about it, otherwise you will find yourself cast down into a lake of fire (see Milton) on the exams.

 

 

Tests/Final Exam

 

There are 3 tests: 2 during the semester, and a Final Exam.  The tests will be short answer/essay, and will cover each of the 3 parts of the course (OE period, ME period, 16-18th C.).  You will receive a review sheet prior to each test, which we will go over.  The Final is called that because it is the last one, but will be similar to the others, except that it may contain a few questions asking you to consider issues that span the course.

 

Group Reports

 

The class will be divided into 8 groups.  During the course,  each group will receive 4 sets of questions about specific reading assignments.  On the date indicated on the schedule, your group will present the answers to the class.  In addition, the answers must be typed out and handed in to me (include your name(s), group number, and question number(s)).  They will be graded both on quality of response and writing mechanics.

 

There are several ways to handle these reports.  The group can collaborate on all of the questions, or each group member can take one of the questions, or there can be some mix of these two.

The course schedule is busy, so group work will have to occur outside of class.  While this can create some practical problems, group discussion can be rewarding and help to lighten the load.

 

 

Individual Papers

 

Choose 2: 1 each from group A and B.  * = extra credit available (half grade).  As a rule you are limited to these choices, but other works/authors may be approved after consultation with me.

 

Papers should be 5-7 pgs (word processed, double-spaced, page numbered), and include a cover page that has a descriptive title, your name, and the course number.  You must use MLA documentation  style for quotations and citations, and include a Works Cited page at the end.

 

The papers are designed to exercise your critical faculties and to supplement class readings with other representative works. No secondary research is necessarily required.  The general object of these papers is to provide an interpretation which discusses a problem, issue, theme, or feature as it relates to the period that the work represents.  PLAN TO TALK TO ME about your paper topics.  Papers will be graded on quality of thought, but also on organization and mechanics.

 

Group A

 

Gnomic Verses (handout)

Wulf and Eadwacer (handout)

The Wanderer (handout)

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight *

A selection from Margery Kempe

A Mystery Play: Noah's Flood or the Second Shepherd's Play

William Langland: Piers Ploughman *

 

Group B (if several works are listed, choose one)

 

Edmund Spencer, The Faerie Queen, Canto 1 *

Sir Philip Sidney, The Defense of Poesy *

Christopher Marlowe, The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus *

George Herbert: Jordan (1), The Collar

Ben Jonson: On My First Daughter, On My First Son, To Penshurst,

                Volpone *

Robert Herrick: Delight in Disorder, Upon Julia's Clothes

Andrew Marvell: To His Coy Mistress

Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism *

John Dryden, Mac Flecknoe *

William Congreve, The Way of the World *

Samuel Johnson, From The Preface to Shakespeare *

Aphra Behn, Oroonoko, or The Royal Slave *

John Bunyan, The Pilgrim's Progress *

Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

Christopher Smart, Jubilate Agno (My Cat Jeoffry)


EN234001 English Literature II

MWF 11:00 CAS 123

E. Gadzinski, office library 319, phone 635-2115, email egadzinski@lssu.edu

Office Hours MTWRF 1:00-3:00 and by appointment

 

TEXTS

 

Required: Norton Anthology of English Literature, 7th ed., Vol. 2

 

Recommended: Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1,  Also, M.H. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms.

 

Other required and recommended texts: will be provided as handouts, put on reserve in the library, or possibly purchased as the semester proceeds.

 

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

 

Our task is to gain a basic familiarity with and an examination of literature written primarily in the British Isles over the last 200 years, and to do so by the last week of this April.  A good deal of our focus will be on poetry (because it’s relatively short, but dense, and that’s where a lot of the readily visible changes happened, but we’ll also include some essays and short fiction, some drama, a quite possibly some shortish novels.

 

GENERAL OUTLINE OF THE COURSE

 

1.      How did we get there from there?  What was happening socially, economically, politically, historically and artistically around the turn of the 19th Century in England for writers to start thinking about making a different literature?  What and who were the Romantics? What were they reacting against or toward?  We need to find this out because our basic image of the writer and writing is based on them.

 

2.      The Victorians.  What’s up with that/them?  How is Victorian  literature both based upon but also a rejection of Romantic literature?  What are typically Victorian literary characteristics and what the heck are Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll and assorted other zanies doing in that bunch?

 

3.      End of the 19th C.  Symbolists, Pre-Raphaelites, Decadents, Art for art’s sake and other matters exquisitely weird.

 

4.      Early Modern and Modernism with a giant war right in the middle of it.

 

5.      The 1920s and 30s.  High Modernism and reactions to it, social consciousness, the Spanish Civil war, economic depression, impending doom.

 

6.      The 1940s.  World War II.  Here we go again, or do we? What’s different , and what’s the same?

 

7.      The 1950s and 60s.  Collapse of Empire.  Philip Larkin writes the best poems in the English language.  The Angry Young Men.  The Beatles and all that.  Groovy.

 

8.      Postmodern vs. Postmodern.  Anything written after the Second World War can be called postmodern (since it’s after the heyday of modernism, get it?) but there is another school of critical and literary thought based on linguistics and semiotics (deconstruction) and social theory(grounded in Marxism) that suggests that something altogether different is happening, at least to some.  Where are we?

 

ASSIGNMENTS

 

You will, of course, have reading assignments, which will be made clear to you.  There will be no quizzes or exams, but rather a number of short papers generally asking you to critically respond to the reading, apply your understanding of a literary movement/definition/concept to a work that we haven’t discussed, to pursue some issue further that we may have discussed and/or to make a presentation on some aspect of the period to the rest of us.  Expect at least some of these papers to require additional research on your part, and at least one of these papers (call it the final) on a topic of your own choosing.

 

THE FIRST READING ASSIGNMENT

 

For Wednesday, read the Norton Vol. 1 introduction to 18th C., Neoclassical/Augustan literature of what’s known as the Enlightenment (Dryden, Pope, Swift and such) and be able to talk about its typical characteristics.  Also read the Norton Vol. 2 introduction to the Romantic period.  Our discussions on Wednesday and Friday will focus on what changes occurred and why, and to define a set of Romantic characteristics.

 

WHAT SYLLABUS?

 

As soon as possible (by Friday) I’ll give you a specific schedule of assignments and paper descriptions and due dates, at least for the Romantic section of the course.

 


EN231F01 American Literature I

MTWR 10:00-11:50, CASET 211

Dr. Gadzinski, Libr. 319, 635-2115, egadzinski@gw.lssu.edu; Office hrs. MTW 12:00-2:00

 

Texts:

 

·        The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Vol. A), Literature to 1820.

·        Handouts

·        The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Vol. B), 1820-1865 (on reserve) 

 

 

Schedule:

 

May     10  Introduction

Reading Day (no class): First Contact--Separatism: Literature to 1700 (Norton); Ojibwe Creation Stories (handout); Columbus, Letter to Louis de Santangel (Norton); DeVaca, The Relation (Norton);

 Discussion

Reading Day (no class): Champlain, Account of Etienne Brule (Norton); Smith, What Happened till the First Supply (Norton); Native Trickster Tales (Norton, and handout)

 

17    Discussion

18    Reading Day (no class): Bradford, The Separatist Interpretation, Of Their Voyage, How They Sought, Mayflower Compact (Norton).

19    Discussion

20    Reading Day (no class): Williams, A Key to the Language (Norton); Bradstreet, Old England and New, Before the Birth, Burning of our House (Norton); Taylor, Upon Wedlock (Norton); Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World (Norton).

 

            24  Discussion

25    Reading Day (no class): Nationhood--Enlightenment, Literature 1700-1820 (Norton); Edwards, The Beauty of the World, Images of Divine Things (Norton); Franklin, Information, Remarks Concerning the Savages (Norton); Crevecoeur, What is an American, Distresses of a Frontier Man (Norton)

26    Discussion. . . . . .Essay 1 due

27    Reading Day (no class): Paine, The Crisis, The Age of Reason (Norton); Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence(Norton); Freneau, On the Religion of Nature, To a New England Poet (Norton)

 


31  Memorial Day (no class)

1    Discussion

2        Reading Day (no class):  American Renaissance—Romanticism, Emerson, Nature, The Poet (handout); Thoreau, Walden Chapter 1(handout)

3        Discussion

 

           

 

7    Reading Day (no class):  Hawthorne, Young Goodman Brown (handout)

8        Discussion. . . Essay 2 due

9        Reading Day (no class):  Melville, Moby Dick, Loomings, Ahab, The Quarterdeck, The Whiteness of the Whale, the Masthead (handout)

10    Discussion

 

 

14   Reading Day (no class):  Whitman, Song of Myself (handout)

15   Discussion

16      Reading Day (no class): Dickinson, 185, 214, 241, 249, 258, 303, 341, 435, 441, 632, 732, 754, 986, 1129, 1078, 1732 (handout)

17      Discussion

 

21    Essay 3 due

 


Essay 1

First Contact (lit to 1700)

Choose one:

 

A.     A European text

  1. Identify the author and the years it was written
  2. Summarize the text.
  3. Discuss the author’s purpose for writing
  4. Discuss the cultural values/assumptions/perspectives demonstrated in the text
  5. Discuss what the text reveals about the experience of America

 

B   A Native text

  1. Identify the tribe and its geographical location
  2. Summarize the text
  3. Discuss the cultural values/assumptions/perspectives demonstrated in the text
  4. Compare and contrast features of Native culture demonstrated in the text with European culture.

 

Essay 2

Enlightenment

A.     Using the Norton introduction to the period, explain Enlightenment ideals and their role in the period’s ideals of America (see Norton: “Enlightenment Ideals,” and “Pursuing Happiness”).

B.     Using a text from the period, summarize the text, then discuss whether and how the text demonstrates those ideals/ideas.

 

Essay 3

Transcendentalism/Romanticism

A.     Using the Norton introduction to the period, define American Romanticicm/Transcendentalism (see Norton: “Orthodox Religion and Transcendentalism” and Emerson’s “Nature” and/or “The Poet”)

B.     Using a text from the period, summarize the text, then discuss whether and how the text demonstrates those ideals/ideas.

 

 

 

Essays should be about 5 double-spaced pages (more is fine, less is generally not).  Grading will be based on quality of thought/definitions, critical reflection on the chosen texts, and the usual curses of grammar, spelling, and punctuation.  Also, judicious use of quotations from the primary or secondary text, and proper citation and bibliographical format (e.g., MLA or APA) will be important to the grade.  Please feel free to see me during reading days, office hours, or schedule an appointment, to talk about your essays.

 

 

 


EN 232: American Literature II
MWF 1-3:30, CAS 107

 


Home -- Policy Statement -- Syllabus -- Research Links

 


Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty
Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-9:30 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Text:
Lauter, Paul, ed. The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 2. 4th ed. New York: Houghton, 2002.

Course Description and Goals:
Catalog Description: A chronological study of American literature from the Civil War through the present, covering the Age of Realism and the development of twentieth century literature. Prerequisite: EN110. Pre- or co-requisite: EN111.

The Reality: We're going to spend the next six weeks trying to cover almost 150 years of American Literature. You’ll be reading well-known authors as well as some lesser known ones, and you’ll be learning about them in terms of history (literary as well as world) and artistry. By the end of the session, you should have a solid understanding of how these authors and their texts fit into their historical era and what makes them lasting documents.

Course Policies:

Attendance: This is a small class and absences will be more noticeable than in many classes. You are expected to attend class and to be prepared to discuss the literature you're reading. If you are unable to come to class, it is your responsibility to make up the work you missed and to get notes from a classmate. Because this class meets for six weeks only, missing even a single session will mean you miss a significant chunk of material.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is small, it is important that everyone has something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments: Each assignment is worth 25% of your final grade.

·         Journal (and Quizzes if necessary): Each week you will be required to submit a journal discussing one of the readings from the past week. The journals need to focus on analyzing the text you choose. DO NOT give a plot summary of the text. Rather, talk about its literary merit—character, narrative, historical importance, theme, etc. Be specific in your analysis, and bring in specific examples from the text to support your points. Each journal should be 2-3 pages long. In addition to the journals, you may be responsible for taking reading quizzes if I discover that you are not doing the readings. Quizzes may not be announced, so you should always be prepared to take one.

·         Paper: You will write a 3-5-page paper for this assignment. Choose one text that you did not read (preferably by an author we did not cover) in the Late Nineteenth Century: 1865-1910 section (1-886) and write an analysis of it based on some of the historical aspects of the period that we have discussed in class. You can focus on how it reflects and/or challenges the events that were happening during this period. Alternately, you may examine it in terms of some of the literary trends of the time (realism/naturalism/regionalism). This paper is due on Monday, 14 July.

·         Presentation: During the first week of class, you will pair up with another student in the class and together choose one of the authors that we’ll be reading in class (see syllabus). On the day that we are scheduled to read that author, you and your partner will present a brief overview (no more than 10 minutes) of the author’s work in its historical context and then lead a discussion of the assigned reading. You may, if you like, choose different/additional readings by that author for the class to read, but if you want to do this, you must let me know at least 1 week in advance so that I can announce the change to the class. The presentation/discussion should last a minimum of 30 minutes (only 10 of which may be biographical and historical presentation).

·         Final Exam (Take-home): Due Monday 4 August. I will distribute the exam the week before it is due.



Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting. That means no cover page for papers. Include a Works Cited Page for each text that you discuss in you papers. Any good handbook will have MLA format in it. I will be happy to help you if you have any questions about the formatting.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Background from Backgrounds Archive


EN/NA 235: Survey of Native Literature of North America
MWF 2:00-2:50 CAS 119

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty
Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 11:00-12:00; TR 10:00-11:00; and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts:
Bruchac, Joseph. The Heart of a Chief. New York: Puffin, 2001.
Erdoes, Richard, and Alfonso Ortiz, eds. American Indian Myths and Legends. New York: Pantheon, 1984.
Johnston, Basil. Ojibway Tales. Lincoln, NE: U of Nebraska P, 1993.
Purdy, John L., and James Ruppert. Nothing But the Truth: An Anthology of Native American Literature. New York: Prentice, 2001.

Recommended Text:
Slapin, Beverly, Doris Seale, and Rosemary Gonzales. How to Tell the Difference: A Guide for Evaluating Children's Books for Anti-Indian Bias. Berkeley, CA: Oyate P, 1995. [Particularly recommended for future educators--see oyate.org for more information about Native American children's books.]

Course Goals:
Catalog Description: An overview of Native American Literature, including myths, poetry, biographies, legends and stories from recognized Indian and non-Indian authors. The significance of Indian philosophy found in such literature will be emphasized. Pre-req. EN 210 or 215.

The Reality: The goal of this course is to expose students to the variety of literatures from various nations of North America. To that effect, we will examine traditional literatures, non-fiction, poetry, and fiction, and discuss the difficulties of defining "Native American literature" and "Native American authors," among other issues and themes.

Course Policies:
I. Attendance: This class meets once a week. As such, it is vital that you attend every class since missing a single class constitutes missing an entire week of materials. If you must miss a class, it is your responsibility to make up your work by talking to other class members.

II. Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Many of the subjects we will discuss are highly charged, and a consensus on these subjects is unlikely. That's fine. I want to lay the information on the table so that you're aware of the issues. If you know of additional information that may be of use to the class, please bring it up.

III. Assignments: You will complete the following assignments this semester:

·         Reading Journal: Each week, starting Monday, 21 Jan, you will have a 2-3 page journal entry due about some aspect of the reading you do for the week. These journal entries can focus on anything from a literary aspect of the reading to a comparison of a couple readings to a discussion of the nation you're reading about. It should not be just a simple "I like this reading because" or "This reading reminds me of the time I. . ." Move beyond initial response to the readings and explore meanings of the texts. I will collect journals at the beginning of each class. (20%)

·         Essay 1: This essay will be about the traditional literature we read. I will distribute a specific assignment sheet once we are closer to the due date. (15%)

·         Essay 2: This essay will be about either Bruchac's Heart of a Chief or Johnston's Ojibway Tales. I will distribute a specific assignment sheet once we are closer to the due date. (20%)

·         Presentation: For this assignment, you may work individually or with one other person. You will choose one of the authors represented in the Purdy and Ruppert anthology and research his/her nation and literature and present background information on this author (at least 10 minutes). Then you will lead a discussion on the author's texts for the remainder of the class. (20%)

·         Research Paper: You will choose some aspect of Native American literatures to research for this project. I will distribute a separate assignment sheet for this paper at the beginning of the semester. (25%)

All assignments need to be completed in MLA format and should be typed. If you're not sure what MLA format is, see me and I will give you instructions. Further, I expect all assignments to be proofread carefully. Sloppy work is unacceptable.

IV. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university.

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EN 236: Literature and Culture

MWF 1:00-1:50, CAS 211

 


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Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:50 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Text:
Thieme, John, ed. The Arnold Anthology of Post-Colonial Literatures in English. New York: Arnold, 1996.

Course Description and Goals:
Catalog Description: Students will examine English-language texts from a variety of cultures, including American minorities and other underrepresented cultures. Students will observe the way in which worldview and texts interact. Co-requisite EN111.

Translation: We're going to do a mad gallop around the world this semester, reading modern texts from all over the globe. Our focus will be short stories and poetry. As a class, we will talk about how the authors' culture(s) impact their writing, but we will also examine the literature for common threads.

Course Policies:
Attendance: Being absent is not an excuse for missing an assignment. It is your responsibility to keep up with your own attendance. If you know in advance that you will miss a class, see me beforehand, or call or e-mail me. You are responsible for all course work, whether you are present in class or not. Your daily quizzes will indicate your attendance, and you are responsible for arranging to make up any quizzes you miss. You will have one week to make up quizzes, and if you do not make them up within that time frame, you will receive a zero on the quiz. If you are late to class, you will not be allowed to make up the quiz.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is so small, it is important that everyone have something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments: Each assignment will count as 20% of your final grade. Please note that you must submit all 3 major papers to pass the course, though submitting them does not guarantee you a passing mark.

·         Journal (and Quizzes): Each Friday, beginning on 12 September, you will have a journal entry due about your week's readings. There are a couple of options for your journal. You may choose a single reading and analyze it closely; you may compare a couple of readings; or you may choose some aspect of the readings that you find similar and discuss it. No matter which option you choose, you will need to bring in specific references to the texts you read to support your points. Journals should be 2 to 3 pages long and may be either typed or handwritten, but if you choose to hand write your journal entry, you must do so legibly. If I cannot read your journal, you will receive a zero for it. In addition to the reading journals, you will be responsible for taking reading quizzes about each day’s assigned reading(s).

·         Presentation: For this assignment, you may work individually or with one other person. On Monday, 8 September, you will sign up to do a presentation about one of the readings on your syllabus. For this presentation, you need to research the author and the author's culture/country. You will present your findings to the class and then lead a discussion of the reading(s) that were assigned for that day. During your research, if you find a different reading(s) than those on the syllabus that you would like the class to read, you may bring me a copy of the reading and I will make sure that everyone gets a copy. If you choose to do this, get me the reading at least 1 week before you are scheduled to present. You should take some time to look over the authors before you sign up.

·         3 Papers: You will be required to write three papers during the course of the semester. I will distribute the specific assignments as they draw closer.

Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting. That means no cover page for papers. Include a Works Cited Page for each text that you discuss in you papers. Any good handbook will have MLA format in it. I will be happy to help you if you have any questions about the formatting.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper’s grade. For every 5 grammar and mechanical errors on your papers (including MLA formatting), you will lose one letter grade. Take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Disability Services and Accommodations for Students: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of class, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in South Hall Office 206. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.

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EN 340: Genre Studies: Folklore
MWF 9:30-12:00, CAS 211

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty
Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-9:30 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts:
Datlow, Ellen, and Terri Windling, eds. Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears. New York: AvoNova, 1995.
McKinley, Robin. Rose Daughter. New York: Ace, 1997.
Zipes, Jack, ed. The Great Fairy Tale Tradition. New York: Norton, 2001.

Course Description and Goals:
Catalog Description: This course focuses on an understanding of the formal characteristics, critical interpretation, and the history and development of a single literary genre, including but not limited to the novel, the short story, drama, or poetry. Pre/Co-requisites: EN231/2 or EN233/4. Variable topics: may be repeated twice for credit.

Our Topic: The topic of this course is listed as folklore, though a more apt description might by folktales. We are going to examine folktales, primarily the European tradition of folktales, and how they have been shaped by writing, from their initial “compilers” (some would say authors) to modern interpretations and variations of these tales. The goals of this class are for you to understand what constitutes a folktale and its elements and for you to see how these elements have influenced not just modern revisions of the tales, but also elements of narrative as a whole.

Course Policies:

Attendance: This is a small class and absences will be more noticeable than in many classes. You are expected to attend class and to be prepared to discuss the literature you're reading. If you are unable to come to class, it is your responsibility to make up the work you missed and to get notes from a classmate. Because this class meets for six weeks only, missing even a single session will mean you miss a significant chunk of material.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is small, it is important that everyone has something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments:

·         Journal (and Quizzes if necessary): (30%) Each week you will be required to submit a journal discussing one of the readings from the past week. The journals need to focus on analyzing the text you choose. DO NOT give a plot summary of the text. Rather, talk about its literary merit—character, narrative, historical importance, theme, etc. Be specific in your analysis, and bring in specific examples from the text to support your points. Each journal should be 2-3 pages long. In addition to the journals, you may be responsible for taking reading quizzes if I discover that you are not doing the readings. Quizzes may not be announced, so you should always be prepared to take one.

·         Paper: (30%): You will write a 4-6-page paper for this assignment about one of the sections of the Zipes text that we have not discussed in class. You may choose a single text for the paper or talk about the section as a whole. You will examine the motifs and other folktale elements of this text/section and compare it to other sections/texts that we have discussed in class. What types of conclusions can you reach about this text/section based on class discussions? How is the text/section unique? This paper is due on Friday, 18 July.

·         Final: (30%): You will write a 5-7-page paper for this assignment. For this assignment, you have 2 options:

·         You may choose a rewritten folktale that we have not discussed in class (it does not have to be in the Datlow & Windling text—see me if you’d like a list of other possible texts) and analyze how it adapts the original text in its new form. What effects do the alterations have on the original? Why might the text have been adapted in this way? You may also choose a film version to analyze.

·         You may choose a text or a film that is not explicitly a revision of a folktale and examine it for folktale elements. What expectations does the audience have of the text/film based on these elements? How have folktales affected the vision of the text/film?

For each of these options, you need to clear your text with me before you start working on it. If you’d like help choosing a text, please let me know, and I’ll be happy to offer suggestions. The final is due on Monday, 4 August. We will discuss your findings in class.

·         Participation: (10%): This aspect of your grade will be based on your attendance and participation in class discussions. You are expected to participate in the discussions (which you can only do if you attend class), and a lack of participation will pull your grade down.

Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting. That means no cover page for papers. Include a Works Cited Page for each text that you discuss in you papers. Any good handbook will have MLA format in it. I will be happy to help you if you have any questions about the formatting.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Background from Backgrounds Archive







EN 335: Children’s Literature in the Classroom
TR
12:00-1:20, CAS 107

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty
Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: M-F 10:00-10:50 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts:
Altman, Linda Jacobs. Amelia’s Road. Illus. Enrique O. Sanchez. New York: Lee & Low, 1993.
Curtis, Christopher Paul. The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963. New York: Laurel-Leaf Newbery, 1995.
DiCamillo, Kate. Because of Winn-Dixie. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick, 2000.
Erdrich, Louise. The Birchbark House. New York: Hyperion, 1999.
Falconer, Ian. Olivia. New York: Atheneum, 2000.
Hesse, Karen. Out of the Dust. New York: Scholastic Signature, 1997.
Horvath, Polly. The Trolls. New York: Farrar, 1999.
Munsch, Robert. The Paper Bag Princess. Illus. Michael Martchenko. New York: Annick, 1980.
Steig, William. Doctor DeSoto. New York: Farrar, 1982.
White, E.B. Charlotte’s Web. Illus. Garth Williams. New York: HarperTrophy, 1952.
Wolf, Shelby A. Interpreting Literature with Children. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2004.
Zelinsky, Paul O. Rapunzel. New York: Dutton, 1997.

[Please note that you may use any edition of the above texts that you like.]

Course Description and Goals:
Catalog Description:
A review of the rich and diverse field of literature for children from infancy to adolescence. Required for elementary teacher non-English majors and an elective for English majors. Prerequisites: EN111 and SD101.

Translation: We will spend this semester talking about children’s literature from several perspectives, most notably how to interpret the literature with children in K-8 classrooms. One of the other focuses of the class will be the diverse range of texts available by authors of different ethnic and minority backgrounds. You will be required to examine children’s literature from both a teacher and a student point of view.

Course Requirements:
Attendance:
Being absent is not an excuse for missing an assignment. It is your responsibility to keep up with your own attendance. If you know in advance that you will miss a class, see me beforehand, or call or e-mail me. You are responsible for all course work, whether you are present in class or not.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is small, it is important that everyone has something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments: Each of these assignments will be worth 20% of your final grade. For the last four assignments, more specific instructions will be distributed at a later date. Please note that you must complete all four of the major projects to pass the class, though completing them all does not guarantee a passing mark.

·         Journal: For each of the 8 chapters in Wolf’s Interpreting Literature with Children, we will be reading one or two primary texts. On the day that the discussion of the chapter and text(s) begins, you will have a journal entry due that discusses the primary text(s). You may write about the text in terms of the material covered in the chapter, but you may also approach the text(s) in other ways, from a basic literary analysis to some ideas about how you might incorporate the text(s) into a classroom situation. Make sure that you’re specific when you discuss the text(s) and that you bring in examples from the text to support your points.

·         Paper Analysis: In this assignment, you will choose a piece of children’s literature not read for this class and write an analysis of it using the first section of Interpreting Literature with Children as a guide.

·         Diversity Panel: You will work in small groups for this assignment and research the children’s literature of a specific ethnic, minority or other group. Each panel will be responsible for presenting its findings to the class, including a handout with a bibliography of primary and secondary texts.

·         Picture Book Analysis: You will choose a picture book and present a brief—5-10 minute—analysis of the text and artwork to class. In addition, you will hand in a written analysis of the picture book to me.

·         Dramatic Interpretation: For this assignment you will have two options. You may either write up a plan for dramatizing/incorporating drama in a text not discussed in Chapter 8, or you may work in a small group to create a short (no longer than 10 minutes) performance based on a text not discussed in Chapter 8. The presentation must be accompanied by an analysis and explanation of how the performance was devised and what it reveals about the text that a discussion of the text might not reveal. Presentations will take place the final week of classes and, if necessary, during the final exam slot on Tuesday, 14 December from 12:30-2:30.

Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting. That means no cover page for papers. Include a Works Cited Page for each text that you discuss in your papers, including weekly journals. Any good handbook will have MLA format in it, and there are also several guides that have more complete MLA formatting instructions in them. I will also be happy to help you if you have any questions about the formatting.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper grade. For papers of 5 pages or fewer, for every 5 different grammar and mechanical errors (including MLA formatting errors), you will lose 1 letter grade. For papers longer than 5 pages, the number of different errors at which a paper grade is lowered by a letter equals the number of pages in the paper (thus a 12 page paper will lose a letter grade if it has 12 different errors). There is no limit to the number of letter grades you can lose (past students have lost as much as 30 points due to sloppy work), so take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Students Accommodations and Support Services: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of classes, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in the Library 101. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.


EN407  20th C. Lit, Spring 05

E. Gadzinski, Libr. 319, 635-2115, egadzinski@lssu.edu , Office hrs. mtwrf 1-3 or by appt.

 

Class Schedule:

 

Jan.      31  Hardy:  Hap, Channel Firing, The Voice, The Oxen

Feb      2    Conrad: Heart of Darkness

4        Conrad: Heart of Darkness

 

7        Amy  Lowell: The Pike; Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken, Birches, Desert

       Places

9    Edward Thomas: Adlestrop; A.E. Housman: Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff

                  Love

11    Wilfred Owen: Dulce Et Decorum Est, Disabled,  Ivor Gurney, To His Love

 

14    Siegfried Sassoon: Repression of War Experience; David Jones, from In

Parenthesis

16   E. E. Cummings, my sweet old etcetera, I sing of Olaf glad and big

18      Selections from Doughboy Doggerel (handout)

 

21  T. S. Eliot: The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

23   Eliot: The Wasteland

25    The Wasteland

 

SPRING BREAK:  Recommended reading: Graves and Hodge, the Long Weekend (on reserve)—chapters Armistice 1918; Women; Reading Matter; Amusements; Sex; Art, Literature, and Religion

 

Mar      7  Ezra Pound:  In a Station at the Metro; The River Merchant’s Wife: a Letter,

                 Hugh Selwyn Mauberly (Life and Contacts)

            9   Virginia Woolf: The Mark on the Wall

            11  Susan Glaspell: Trifles

 

14    W. B. Yeats: The Lake Isle of Inisfree, The Second Coming, Sailing to

      Byzantium, An Irish Airman Forsees His Death, The Magi, Politics

            16  Dorothy Parker: The Waltz

18    William Carlos Williams: The Red Wheel Barrow, This is Just to Say, To

       Elsie

 

21    Wallace Stevens: Sunday Morning, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird,

       Anecdote of the Jar, The Snow Man

            23   W. H. Auden:  Musee des Beaux Arts

24    No Class (Instructor out of town)

 

 

28    Gavin Ewart: When a Beau Goes In; Keith Douglas: Vergissmeinicht,

      Aristocrats; Henry Reed: Naming of Parts

29    Randall Jarell: The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner; James Dickey: The

      Firebombing; Lincoln Kerstein: Fall In, 8th Armored.

Apr      1

 

            4

            6

            8

            11

            13

            15

 

            18

            20

            22

 

            27  Final Paper due


EN 410: The Children's Literary Tradition

TR 12:00-1:20

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty

Office: 301 KJS Library

Office Hours: MWF 11:00-11:50, TR 10:00-11:00, and by appointment

Phone: 635-2378

E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu

Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts:*

Lang Orange Fairy Book (1906)

Grahame Wind in the Willows (1908)

Lewis The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

Norton The Borrowers (1952)

Tolkien Fellowship of the Ring (1954)

Jansson Comet in Moominland (1961)

Juster The Phantom Tollbooth (1961)

LeGuin A Wizard of Earthsea (1968)

Cooper The Dark Is Rising (1973)

Duane So You Want to Be a Wizard (1983)

L’Engle Many Waters (1986)

Colfer Artemis Fowl (2001)

*For all texts, you may use any unabridged edition. The texts are listed in the order in which we will read them.

Course Description and Goals:

English 410 surveys the history of children’s literature and its relationship to the development of cultural and societal conceptions of childhood. Emphasis is on critical reading and in-depth analysis of the various forms of this literary tradition. Prerequisite: EN 231-232 or EN 233-234, or permission of instructor.

This class is first and foremost a literature course. We will do significant amounts of reading and analysis throughout the term. Along the way, we will discuss the way that the texts change from one generation to the next. The focus of the course this term is the history of Fantasy Fiction in Children’s Literature. We will examine it from its roots in folk literature to its modern forms. In addition to the assigned readings for class, you will be required to read additional texts from a different literary genre and to complete a presentation about picture books.

Class Policies:

Attendance: This class is a discussion class, and you are expected to participate in all of the discussions. Missing class will mean that you miss an important aspect of the course—the analyses we make of the texts and also the presentations your classmates make about their specific topics. If you must miss a class, it is your responsibility to make up your work by talking to other class members or by making an appointment to see me outside of class.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is so small, it is important that everyone has something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments: All assignments need to be completed in MLA format and should be typed. If you're not sure what MLA format is, look it up in a handbook, go to the Writing Lab, or see me. See the separate Assignments sheet for specific details about the required work.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper grade. For papers of 5 pages or fewer, for every 5 different grammar and mechanical errors (including MLA formatting errors), you will lose 1 letter grade. For papers longer than 5 pages, the number of different errors at which a paper grade is lowered by a letter equals the number of pages in the paper (thus a 12 page paper will lose a letter grade if it has 12 different errors). There is no limit to the number of letter grades you can lose (past students have lost as much as 30 points due to sloppy work), so take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Students Accommodations and Support Services: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of classes, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in the Library 101. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.


EN 420: History of the English Language

MWF 1-1:50

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty

Office: 301 KJS Library

Office Hours: MWF 11:00-11:50, TR 10:00-11:00, and by appointment

Phone: 635-2378

E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu

Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Text:

Crystal, David. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. 2nd ed. 1995. New York: Cambridge UP, 2003.

Course Objectives: This course is meant to introduce students to the history of the English language. The focus will naturally be on language change. We will examine not just how English has changed phonologically, morphologically, syntactically, and lexically, but why the language changes may have occurred from a social perspective. By the end of the semester, you should have a solid understanding of the development of English from its Proto Indo-European roots to the present, including worldwide variations.

Course Policies:

Course Format: Due to the nature of the materials we will cover in class, I will frequently need to lecture about the specific topics we cover. I will, however, try to limit the lectures (for your sake and mine). We will also do some pronunciation work with literary texts from various periods in English, we will work on in-class exercises about the language changes, and we will watch several episodes from The Story of English series produced by PBS in 1986. When possible, we will have class discussions. Always feel free to ask questions during class, whether I’m lecturing or not.

Attendance: Each of the language periods we study in this class will build on the previous ones. As a result, if you miss class, you may have some difficulty following the new discussion. If you must miss class, get notes from a classmate. If you do not understand a concept you missed, make arrangements to see me during my office hours so that we can go over the material. It is your responsibility to make up any work that you miss.

Assignments: Your grade will be based on 6 different assignments. Please note that you must submit all assignments to pass the course, though submitting them all does not guarantee you a passing mark:

ű Homework/Quizzes—Occasionally I will assign homework for you to complete. You will also be required to take several quizzes, both written and oral. For the oral quizzes, which will take place in my office, you will have to read short passages of texts from Old English, Middle English, and Early Modern English. We will go over the readings in class several times before you will have to read them for me. (10%)

ű Article analyses—For the Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English (including World Englishes) sections of the course, you will be required to find a journal article about that period (not from the internet), read it, and submit a written summary (about 1/3 of the paper) and analysis of the article (2/3 of paper). Do not use book reviews. Your chosen article may be about literature or history from the time period, but the focus of should be language use. Each analysis should be approximately 3-4 pages long. Attach a copy of the article to the analysis when you submit it.(20%)

ű Exam 1—Take-home, due14 Feb, by 5 in my office. (15%)

ű Exam 2—Take-home, due 28 Mar, by 5 in my office. (15%)

ű Exam 3—Take-home, due Wednesday, 27 April, by 5 in my office. (15%)

ű Research Project—You will complete a major research project (10-15 pages long, due 22 April by 5 in my office) about any aspect of language and a short presentation (5-10 minutes) about that research (due the last week of classes). Your topic can be anything to do with language, from pre-Old English origins to present day languages. You may focus on literature in your paper, but if you do so, you must have a linguistic perspective on it. Start with a broad topic and narrow it as you conduct your research. Past topics have included an analysis of language in Shakespeare and in Chaucer; the history of swearing; the background of the names for days of the week and for months; the role of language in Pygmalion; a history of Black English; a history of Spanglish; an examination of gravestone typography (this was a field work project); an examination of Romany; language acquisition; translations of the Bible (and the King James Version only movement); and the role of Noah Webster in American English. Do not rely on internet sources. You will be required to give brief updates on your research in class on Jan 31, March 7, and Apr 4. (25%)

All assignments should be in MLA format. If you do not know what MLA format looks like, consult a handbook, go to the Writing Lab, or come see me.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper grade. For papers of 5 pages or fewer, for every 5 different grammar and mechanical errors (including MLA formatting errors), you will lose 1 letter grade. For papers longer than 5 pages, the number of different errors at which a paper grade is lowered by a letter equals the number of pages in the paper (thus a 12 page paper will lose a letter grade if it has 12 different errors). There is no limit to the number of letter grades you can lose (past students have lost as much as 30 points due to sloppy work), so take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation, including on take-home exams. If you are caught plagiarizing, you are subject to a variety of punishments, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Students Accommodations and Support Services: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of classes, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in the Library 101. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.


EN 433: Topics in Literature and Composition
Canadian Literature

TR 12:30-1:50

 


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Instructor: Dr. Amie A. Doughty
Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 11:00-12:00; TR 10:00-11:00; and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts:
Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid’s Tale.
Atwood, Margaret, and Robert Weaver. The New Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English.
Geddes, Gary. 15 Canadian Poets X 3.
Highway, Tomson. The Rez Sisters.
King, Thomas. Green Grass, Running Water.
Montgomery, L.M. Anne of Green Gables.

Course Description:
Catalog Description: Study of various specialized topics in literature and composition not offered as part of the core classes. Topics may include studies of specific authors, theorists, and movements in literature and composition. Prerequisite: Junior-senior standing. May be repeated twice for credit.

The Reality: This course will focus on Canadian Literature. We will read English-language texts from a variety of authors from Canada, both well-known and less known. As we examine these texts, we will try to establish a clear concept of Canadian Literature: what it is, and what, if anything, makes it unique among literatures written in English.

Course Requirements:
Attendance: This is a very small class and absences will be more noticeable than in many classes. You are expected to attend class and to be prepared to discuss the literature you're reading. If you are unable to come to class, it is your responsibility to make up the work you missed and to get notes from a classmate. Though attendance per se will not be graded, there will be a participation grade and absences will naturally affect your participation grade.

Assignments: Your grade will be broken down as follows:

·         Journal (and Quizzes): Each week, starting the second week of classes, you will have a journal entry due. The first journal entry is due on the first day that we discuss Anne of Green Gables (Tuesday, 20 Jan). Each journal entry should be 2-3 pages long and examine an aspect of the text you read (or one of them if we’ve read several that week). The journal entry should refer to specific passages of the text as you examine whatever aspect of the text you choose. Possible focuses include (but are not limited to) character development, theme, point of view, genre, and language use. Avoid phrases such as "I really liked this novel because" and "This story reminded me of the time I." I'm looking for literary analysis and interpretation, not personal bonding. Do not summarize the plot (I too am reading the texts). You may type or hand write journal entries, but if you hand write them, make sure you do so legibly. If I cannot read your handwriting, I will not give your credit for your journal. Journals handed in late (and that includes after I've collected them in class) will lose points. If I discover that students are not reading the assignments, I may also give reading quizzes. These quizzes may not be announced, so always be prepared for them. (20%)

·         Participation: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on in the story or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is so small, it is important that everyone have something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door. Your participation grade will be my evaluation of your input in class discussions. (15%)

·         Short paper: Due 26 Feb. Using Atwood’s argument in Survival: A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature, choose one of the texts we’ve read this semester (or a different one from one of the anthologies) and explore whether this text fits within her theory about Canadian Literature. Talk about character and/or theme in your analysis. The paper should be 5 to 8 pages long. Do not use outside sources. I want this analysis to come from you alone. Make sure that you use specific evidence from your chosen novel and that you cite when you bring in specific examples. Include a Works Cited entry for the novel that you choose. (15%)

·         Presentation: On 20 Jan., you will choose an author either from the Geddes poetry collection (except Atwood) or the Atwood and Weaver short story collection (except Atwood or King) to present about after Spring Break. If there is a Canadian author not in either collection that you would prefer to work with, you may propose to work with that author, though you will need to supply copies of a reading to the class if you choose that route. Once all students have chosen an author, I’ll assign presentation dates, starting the class following Spring Break (9 Mar). You will have half of a class (about 40 minutes) to give some background on your author (very brief) and lead a discussion of your author’s text(s). If you would prefer to do a presentation with someone else, you may do so. (15%)

·         Major Research Paper: Your final project for this course is a research paper (12-15 pages long) about some aspect of Canadian Literature. It can be any aspect that you like, from an examination of a specific author (including the one you choose for your presentation) to the analysis of a single work of Canadian literature, to an examination of a genre or region (e.g. literature of a specific province) of Canadian literature. You may examine creative nonfiction (e.g. essays or other types of nonfiction) as well as more "traditional" forms of literature (fiction, poetry, drama). You may also wish to examine Canadian literature during specific periods (e.g. Colonial or 19th Century). You may also research authors of a specific ethnicity (e.g. First Nations, East Indian, Caribbean, Scots, etc). Your options are wide open, and if you're not sure if a topic fits the criteria, come talk to me, and I'll be happy to discuss it with you. This project is due Tuesday, 27 April by 5 in my office. (35%)

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting, including a Works Cited page for all materials that you quote, paraphrase, or summarize in your papers. That means no cover page for papers. Any good handbook will also have MLA format in it (I recommend Ann Raimes' Keys for Writers or the MLA Handbook).

Disability Services and Accommodations for Students: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of class, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in South Hall Office 206. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper grade. For every 5 different grammar and mechanical errors on your papers (including MLA formatting), you will lose one letter grade. Take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

 


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EN 490: Senior Thesis

TR 2:00-3:20, CAS 108

 


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Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:50 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Texts: (listed in the order that we will read them)
Jim Powell. Postmodernism for Beginners
Beckett, Samuel. Endgame.
Neruda, Pablo. The Heights of Machu Picchu. (0374506485)
Carter, Angela. The Bloody Chamber.
Vizenor, Gerald. The Heirs of Columbus.
Knopp, Lisa. Field of Vision.

Course Description:
Catalog Description: Senior thesis is a sustained exploration of a literary, composition, or language topic. Students will undertake an independent research project and develop it into a major paper. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing.

Translation: The purpose of this course is to offer you the opportunity to do an in-depth, semester-long research project about a topic that interests you. Your goal is to expand your research and analysis skills by producing a final thesis that contains both a review of literature and a unique examination of your chosen topic.

Course Requirements:
Attendance and Class Participation: This is a senior-level English class, so I shouldn't have to dwell on attendance and participation. I expect both from everyone, and if you need to miss class, you know what to do about it—get notes from a classmate.

The Thesis: Your grade for this course will be based entirely on your thesis and the components for the thesis that I collect throughout the semester. Here are the basic elements for this project:

·         Your Topic: The focus of the literature for this course is Postmodern texts. That being said, your thesis does not need to be about this topic. Ideally you will work with Postmodernism in your thesis in some manner, but you are not required to. There are numerous ways in which you could work with the Postmodern, from choosing a work or author who is considered Postmodern to writing about a text from a postmodern perspective. You are not required to work with literature in its traditional sense (i.e. fiction, poetry, or drama) or at all. Your topic can be focused on literature, composition, and/or language. The topic possibilities are practically endless, so keep your mind open. If you're not sure if what you want to do is acceptable, come see me, and we'll talk it over.

·         The Prospectus: Due 2 October in class. This brief paper is an overview of your topic and sources that are available for your research. Though you will not have read (or probably received) all of your sources at this point, you will have done a good amount of your preliminary research and have some ideas about the questions you want to address in your research. See separate handout for more information about the prospectus.

·         Bibliography of Primary and Critical Research: Due 21 October in class. This bibliography will list all of the materials you have collected (or anticipate collecting) for your thesis. In addition to the bibliography, I want you to write an examination of the materials you've read to that point. Talk about what different authors have to say about your topic and your reactions to their points of view. I do not expect you to have read everything on your list at this point, but you should have made significant inroads into the reading.

·         Detailed Outline or Rough Draft: Due 11 November in my office. Make an appointment to meet with me in a conference before Thanksgiving Break when you hand it in. At this point in the semester, you should be well on your way to figuring out how you want to present your materials and what you want to say, so I want a very rough, preliminary outline or draft (whichever you're more comfortable doing). We will discuss the outline or draft when you come to see me.

·         Rough Draft: Due 25 November in class (with enough copies for the entire class). We will exchange drafts and assign dates for peer critique of the theses. When you distribute your draft, you will have the chance to ask the class to pay attention to specific areas that concern you about the draft (and it would be a good idea to include a sheet (as a cover or end sheet) that lists your questions or concerns about the draft). On the 2nd, 4th, 9th and 11th of December, we will do peer revision of the drafts, and you will be responsible for leading the discussion on your draft (in other words, you'll get out of the exercise what you put into it).

·         The Final Thesis: Due by 5 in my office on Monday, 15 December. When you drop off your thesis, sign up for a conference to defend it. You will submit 2 copies of your final thesis, spiral bound (both Office Max and Staples will bind documents). One copy will be for the department's records; the other I will return to you when we meet during finals week. During our meeting, I will expect you to defend your thesis—to answer questions I have about it and to discuss sections that I bring up.

·         Specifications: The final thesis should be between 30 and 40 pages long and include both a review of literature and your examination of the topic. Each part of the project needs to be in MLA format.

·         Open Presentation: During finals week, we will have a public meeting at which you will present your thesis to those in attendance. You will not read the entire thesis, but you will present the main elements (a highlights tour, if you will) to the audience. For those of you planning graduate school, these presentations will be excellent practice for conferences.

·         Electronic Version: Because we will be creating a collection of theses, you must also submit an electronic version of the thesis to me, either on disc or via e-mail. Make sure that your file is saved in either Microsoft Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rtf). In addition, you need to write me an introduction to the thesis/yourself to be included in the thesis collection. This introduction should be between 250 and 500 words in length. The electronic version must be submitted by Thursday, 18 December, which will give you some time to correct errors discovered in your conference.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Disability Services and Accommodations for Students: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of class, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in South Hall Office 206. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.

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EN 236: Literature and Culture

MWF 1:00-1:50, CAS 211

 


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Office: 301 KJS Library
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-10:50 and by appointment
Phone: 635-2378
E-mail: adoughty@lssu.edu
Web Address: http://www.lssu.edu/faculty/adoughty

Required Text:
Thieme, John, ed. The Arnold Anthology of Post-Colonial Literatures in English. New York: Arnold, 1996.

Course Description and Goals:
Catalog Description: Students will examine English-language texts from a variety of cultures, including American minorities and other underrepresented cultures. Students will observe the way in which worldview and texts interact. Co-requisite EN111.

Translation: We're going to do a mad gallop around the world this semester, reading modern texts from all over the globe. Our focus will be short stories and poetry. As a class, we will talk about how the authors' culture(s) impact their writing, but we will also examine the literature for common threads.

Course Policies:
Attendance: Being absent is not an excuse for missing an assignment. It is your responsibility to keep up with your own attendance. If you know in advance that you will miss a class, see me beforehand, or call or e-mail me. You are responsible for all course work, whether you are present in class or not. Your daily quizzes will indicate your attendance, and you are responsible for arranging to make up any quizzes you miss. You will have one week to make up quizzes, and if you do not make them up within that time frame, you will receive a zero on the quiz. If you are late to class, you will not be allowed to make up the quiz.

Class Discussions: I firmly believe that the best learning comes from student-generated class discussions. Therefore, I expect you to come to class having read the materials and prepared to discuss them. If I call on you, I expect you to have something to say about the readings we're doing, even if it's a question about what was going on or your objections to what we've been saying about the text. It is OK to disagree with me and with your classmates, as long as you express your disagreement in a courteous manner. Because this class is so small, it is important that everyone have something to say, so leave your discussion inhibitions at the door.

Assignments: Each assignment will count as 20% of your final grade. Please note that you must submit all 3 major papers to pass the course, though submitting them does not guarantee you a passing mark.

·         Journal (and Quizzes): Each Friday, beginning on 12 September, you will have a journal entry due about your week's readings. There are a couple of options for your journal. You may choose a single reading and analyze it closely; you may compare a couple of readings; or you may choose some aspect of the readings that you find similar and discuss it. No matter which option you choose, you will need to bring in specific references to the texts you read to support your points. Journals should be 2 to 3 pages long and may be either typed or handwritten, but if you choose to hand write your journal entry, you must do so legibly. If I cannot read your journal, you will receive a zero for it. In addition to the reading journals, you will be responsible for taking reading quizzes about each day’s assigned reading(s).

·         Presentation: For this assignment, you may work individually or with one other person. On Monday, 8 September, you will sign up to do a presentation about one of the readings on your syllabus. For this presentation, you need to research the author and the author's culture/country. You will present your findings to the class and then lead a discussion of the reading(s) that were assigned for that day. During your research, if you find a different reading(s) than those on the syllabus that you would like the class to read, you may bring me a copy of the reading and I will make sure that everyone gets a copy. If you choose to do this, get me the reading at least 1 week before you are scheduled to present. You should take some time to look over the authors before you sign up.

·         3 Papers: You will be required to write three papers during the course of the semester. I will distribute the specific assignments as they draw closer.

Assignment Formatting: All assignments need to be prepared in MLA formatting. That means no cover page for papers. Include a Works Cited Page for each text that you discuss in you papers. Any good handbook will have MLA format in it. I will be happy to help you if you have any questions about the formatting.

Grammar and Mechanics: All of you are competent, experienced writers. As such, I expect your papers to have correct grammar and mechanics and to be proofread. Significant errors, especially proofreading errors, will lower your paper’s grade. For every 5 grammar and mechanical errors on your papers (including MLA formatting), you will lose one letter grade. Take the time to edit and proofread your work.

Late Work: I will accept work no more than one week late. All late work will lose 10%. If you know that you won’t be able to get work in on time, see me before the due date, and we may be able to make arrangements for an extension.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the passing off of another's work (whether quoted, paraphrased or summarized) as your own without proper documentation and can result in serious repercussions, including expulsion from the university. Do your own work.

Disability Services and Accommodations for Students: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available. Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of class, to discuss their disability-related needs. Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD). Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations. RCSD is located in South Hall Office 206. The telephone number is (906) 635-2454.

Background from Backgrounds Archive