Content Guidelines/Standards Matrix

 

Content Guidelines/Standards Matrix

 

 

College/University ____________Lake Superior State University ____________  Code:  CD

 

Source of Guidelines/Standards: Michigan State Board of Education, Jan 2002         

Program/Subject Area:    Political Science

 

Note:

Michigan Test for Teacher Certification will assess teacher candidate content knowledge in Political Science.  The single discipline Michigan Test for Teacher Certification in Political Science will cover knowledge of Political Science (60%); basic information in Economics, History, and Geography (20%); and skills using information processing, inquiry, and issue analysis (20%). 

 

 

Directions:  List required courses on matrix and provide additional narrative to explain how standards are met.  If electives are included, they should be clearly indicated.  Adjust size of cells as needed.

 




 

#

Standard/Guideline

Courses and/or Experiences that Fulfill the Standard

 

1.0

Standard 1: Have Content Area Knowledge

The program will provide candidates with a minor (20 semester hour minimum) or a major (30 semester hour minimum) providing in-depth knowledge of the content specified in Michigan Curriculum Framework content standards for Political Science. 

 

 

Taking into account the education needs of students, the teacher candidate is able to use a variety of resources and specialized analyses of political data to:

 

1.1

describe the purposes of state and local governments in the United States; 

 

 

Elementary

Major: 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

Major:  State and local government is mentioned several times in PS 110, but it is the exclusive focus of PS 130, “Introduction to State and Local Government.”

 

 

Minor:  State and local government is mentioned several times in PS 110, but it is the exclusive focus of PS 130, “Introduction to State and Local Government.”

 

1.2

describe the purposes of the national government in the United States;

Elementary

Major: 

 

 

Minor:

 

Secondary

Major:  The purposes of U.S. national government are mentioned in most of our courses, but PS 110—which is devoted to an overview of U.S. national government and politics—discusses this subject extensively.

 

Minor:  The purposes of U.S. national government are mentioned in most of our courses, but PS 110—which is devoted to an overview of U.S. national government and politics—discusses this subject extensively.

 

1.3

describe how citizens organize government to accomplish their purposes and assess their effectiveness;

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Discussed in both PS 110 and PS 130.  Also addressed in several other courses, especially PS 367.

 

 

 

 

Minor:  Discussed in both PS 110 and PS 130.

 

1.4

explain the meaning and origin of the ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other foundational documents of the United States;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  This is a major topic in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in PS 467, “Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties.”

 

 

 

 

Minor:  This is a major topic in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.” 

 

1.5

explain the meaning and origin of the core democratic values expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other foundational documents of the United States;

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

Minor: 

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  This is a major topic in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in PS 352, “Political Philosophy II,” which examines, among other subjects, the political philosophy of John Locke and the Founding Fathers.  This subject is also examined in PS 467, “Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties.”

 

Minor:  This is a major topic in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in PS 352, “Political Philosophy II,” which examines, among other subjects, the political philosophy of John Locke and the Founding Fathers.

 

1.6

describe the political and legal processes created to make decisions, seek consensus, and resolve conflicts in a free society;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  This subject is discussed, on multiple occasions, in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in several other required courses, including PS 130, PS 352, PS 367, and PS 467. 

 

Minor:  This subject is discussed, on multiple occasions, in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in two other required courses, PS 130 and PS 352.

 

1.7

explain how American governmental institutions at the local, state, and federal levels provide for the limitation and sharing of power;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Discussed in several required courses, including PS 110, PS 130, PS 352, PS 367, and PS 467.

 

 

 

 

Minor:  Discussed in three required courses, PS 110, PS 130, and PS 352.

 

1.8

explain how the nation’s political system provides for the exercise of power;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  This is an important subject in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in PS 130, PS 352, PS 367, and PS 467.

 

 

 

Minor:  This is an important subject in PS 110, “Introduction to American Government and Politics.”  It is also addressed in PS 130 and PS 352.

 

1.9

explain how the world is organized politically, including governmental systems and power relationships beyond government; and

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

 

Minor: 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  This is the subject of PS 241, “Introduction to International Relations.” 

 

 

 

Minor:  This is the subject of PS 241, “Introduction to International Relations.” 

 

 

1.10

explain how American foreign policy is formed and describe the roles the United States plays in the international arena. 

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  American foreign policy is one of the topics covered in PS 110.  At the advanced level, it is the entire subject matter of PS 411, “U.S. Foreign Policy.” 

 

 

 

 

Minor:  American foreign policy is one of the topics covered in PS 110. 

 

2.0

Standard 2: Make Interdisciplinary Connections

The program will ensure that candidates understand the fundamental ideas, concepts and facts that provide the basis of the
K-12 content standards in each of the four core social studies disciplines, as specified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework.  Programs may include courses required as general education requirements; for example, an American Government course could supplement a political science minor.  An interdisciplinary course could be taught as part of a major or minor, such as an economic history course for a political science
major.  Clear indications of inter-disciplinary connections should be evidenced in the course syllabi and measures of candidate performance. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking into account the discipline of political science, the teacher candidate is able to:

 

2.1

sequence chronologically major eras within United States history and key events within those eras in order to examine relationships and explain cause and effect;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Major eras and key events are examined within the context of different subjects—such as the Constitution, federalism, civil rights, voting and elections, political parties, Congress, the Presidency, the judiciary, and diverse areas of public policy—as these subjects arise in various courses, including PS 110, PS 130, PS 367, PS 411, and PS 467. 

 

 

Minor:  Major eras and key events are examined within the context of different subjects—such as the Constitution, federalism, civil rights, voting and elections, political parties, Congress, the Presidency, the judiciary, and diverse areas of public policy—as these subjects arise in various courses, including PS 110, PS 130, PS 367, PS 411, and PS 467. 

 

2.2

describe the five themes of geography and apply them to basic world geography;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Covered in GG201, “World Regional Geography.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minor:  Covered in GG201, “World Regional Geography.”

 

2.3

describe the market system and apply basic economic concepts as identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework; and

Elementary

 

Major

 

Minor

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Different types of economic systems, the market, and fundamental economic concepts are examined in PS 110 in the section on economic policy.  Many of these same concepts are also examined in PS 130 during the discussion of government and finance and economic development.  In the major, this is the principal subject of EC 201, “Macroeconomics.”

 

Minor:  Different types of economic systems, the market, and fundamental economic concepts are examined in PS 110 in the section on economic policy.  Many of these same concepts are also examined in PS 130 during the discussion of government and finance and economic development. 

 

2.4

describe the roles that women and minorities have played in American society. 

Elementary

 

Major:

Minor:

 

Secondary

 

Major:  The roles of women and minorities are discussed repeatedly during discussions of the Constitution, civil liberties, civil rights, political socialization, political participation, and domestic policy, among other subjects, especially in PS 110, but also in PS 130, PS 367, and PS 467.

 

Minor:  The roles of women and minorities are discussed repeatedly during discussions of the Constitution, civil liberties, civil rights, political socialization, political participation, and domestic policy, among other subjects, especially in PS 110, but also in PS 130.

 

3.0

Standard 3: Can Apply Social Science Perspectives

The program will help candidates develop skills in the crosscutting themes presented in the Michigan Curriculum Framework social studies content standards (inquiry, public discourse and decision making, and citizen involvement). 

 

 

The teacher candidate is able to:

 

3.1

acquire information from books, maps, newspapers, data sets, and other sources; organize and present the information in maps, graphs, charts, and time lines; interpret the meaning and significance of information; and use a variety of electronic technologies to assist in assessing and managing information;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Students learn to acquire information from books and newspapers in many of our courses, including PS 110, PS 130, PS 241, PS 367, and PS 411.  They learn how to use maps in GG201.  They learn about data sets and data analysis, and the use of graphs, charts, and time lines, in PS 211, “Political Science Research and Statistics.”

 

Minor:  Students learn to acquire information from books and newspapers in many of our courses, including PS 110, PS 130, and PS 241.  They learn how to use maps in GG201.  They learn about data sets and data analysis, and the use of graphs, charts, and time lines, in PS 211, “Political Science Research and Statistics.”

 

3.2

conduct investigations including the ability to formulate a clear statement of questions, gather and organize information from a variety of sources, analyze and interpret information, formulate and test hypotheses, report results both orally and in writing, and make use of appropriate technology;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

Minor:

 

Secondary

 

Major:  These skills are learned at some level in most political science courses, but they receive special attention in PS 211, “Political Science Research and Statistics.”   Use of appropriate technology is also addressed in TE 444 

Minor:  These skills are learned at some level in most political science courses, but they receive special attention in PS 211, “Political Science Research and Statistics.”   Use of appropriate technology is also addressed in TE 444. 

 

3.3

state issues clearly as questions of public policy, trace the origins of the issues, analyze various perspectives people bring to the issue, and evaluate possible ways to resolve the issue;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

Minor:

 

Secondary

 

Major:  These skills are learned at some level in many political science courses, including PS 110 and PS 130, but they receive special attention in PS 211, “Political Science Research and Statistics,” and PS 352, “Political Philosophy II.” 

Minor:  These skills are learned at some level in many political science courses, including PS 110 and PS 130, but they receive special attention in PS 211, “Political Science Research and Statistics,” and PS 352, “Political Philosophy II.” 

 

3.4

engage in constructive conversation about matters of public concern by clarifying issues, considering opposing views, applying democratic values, anticipating consequences, and working toward making decisions;

Elementary

 

Major:  

Minor:

 

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  The methods and topics of PS 110, PS 130, PS 352, PS 367, and PS 467 all facilitate this kind of constructive engagement.

 

Minor:  The methods and topics of PS 110, PS 130, and PS 352 facilitate this kind of constructive engagement.

 

3.5

compose coherent written essays that express positions on public issues and justify the positions with reasoned arguments; and

Elementary

 

Major:

Minor:

 

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Students learn these skills in many of our courses, including PS 130, PS 241, PS 352, PS 367, PS 411, and PS 467.

 

Minor:  Students learn these skills in PS 130, PS 241, and PS 352.

 

3.6

consider the effects of an individual’s actions on other people, how one acts in accordance with the rule of law, and how one acts in a virtuous and ethically responsible way as a member of society. 

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  These subjects are addressed in

PS 110, PS 130, PS 352, and PS 467.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minor:  These subjects are addressed in

PS 110, PS 130, and PS 352.

 

4.0

Can Provide Social Studies Instruction  

The program will teach candidates how to design, present, and assess social studies instruction.  (Programs should provide evidence in field experiences or content area methods classes that candidates have developed instructional skills specifically related to political science.)

 

 

 

 

The teacher candidate:

 

4.1

is knowledgeable about teaching methods, curriculum organization, and instructional materials in political science;

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  Several microteaching units are assigned in TE 444, using different teaching strategies.  All students are required to create curriculum units and utilize technology.  Special emphasis is given to multiculturalism in the curriculum.

 

Minor:  Several microteaching units are assigned in TE 444, using different teaching strategies.  All students are required to create curriculum units and utilize technology.  Special emphasis is given to multiculturalism in the curriculum.

 

4.2

can design, present, and assess instructional activities in political science as described in the Michigan Curriculum Framework teaching and learning standards (higher order thinking, deep knowledge, substantive conversations, and connections to the world beyond the classroom);

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

 

 

Minor: 

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  In TE 444, students are required to create service-learning units that require the use of outside resources to develop the unit.  Case studies that require the student to develop problem-solving skills are also emphasized. 

 

Minor:  In TE 444, students are required to create service-learning units that require the use of outside resources to develop the unit.  Case studies that require the student to develop problem-solving skills are also emphasized. 

 

4.3

has had multiple experiences presenting political science content to students;

Elementary

 

Major: 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  In  TE 444, students are required to develop assessment instruments for lessons.  Assessment components are part of the class.  Students must create rubrics, assessment instruments, and create a demonstration form of assessment.

 

Minor:  In  TE 444, students are required to develop assessment instruments for lessons.  Assessment components are part of the class.  Students must create rubrics, assessment instruments, and create a demonstration form of assessment.

 

4.4

has made sustained use of technology appropriate to teaching political science;

Elementary

 

Major:

 

 

 

Minor:

 

 

Secondary

 

Major:  TE 444 students are required to teach using various forms of technology, including the internet, powerpoint, hyper studio, and other forms of video and computer technology.

 

 

 

 

 

Minor:  TE 444 students are required to teach using various forms of technology, including the internet, powerpoint, hyper studio, and other forms of video and computer technology.

 

 

4.5

can implement the Michigan Curriculum Framework content standards in the political science classroom; and

Elementary

 

Major:

 

Minor:

Secondary

 

Major:  In TE 444, candidates are provided with a copy of the Michigan Curriculum Framework content standards before creating lessons.  Students are assessed according to their use of content standards embedded within the lesson/unit plan.

Minor:  In TE 444, candidates are provided with a copy of the Michigan Curriculum Framework content standards before creating lessons.  Students are assessed according to their use of content standards embedded within the lesson/unit plan.

4.6

will design and use assessments as appropriate to the field of political science. 

Elementary

 

Major:

Minor:

 

Secondary

 

Major:  TE 444 students are required to develop assessment instruments for lessons.  Assessment components are part of the class.  Students must create rubrics, assessment instruments, and create a demonstration form of assessment.

Minor:  TE 444 students are required to develop assessment instruments for lessons.  Assessment components are part of the class.  Students must create rubrics, assessment instruments, and create a demonstration form of assessment.

 

 

Poli Science Standards SBE matrix 11 01.doc