SOCIAL PROBLEMS- Spring 2004

SOC 102

 

Instructor:                     Nancy Bartkowski

Email address:             nancy.bartkowski@davenport.edu

Telephone (home):      (906) 635-8275  (emergency only)

Office Hours:                Room 304 (Adjunct Office), Shouldice Library, Tuesday and Thursday from 11:30 AM -1:30 PM

 

Text:                              Social Problems by William Kornblum and Joseph Julian, 10 ed.  Prentice Hall, New Jersey: 2001.           

                                   

Course Description and Objective:          

This course will introduce the critical social problems of our time.  The problems will be evaluated using the different theoretical perspectives.  The student will learn how the social problem impacts society and what solutions have been proposed.  The student will critically evaluate the solutions and propose alternative ones.  The goal of this class is to identify and investigate areas of crime, violence, family, discrimination, and education. 

 

Course Requirements:

1.      Classroom Activities –  Active participation is crucial to this class.  We want to talk not only about the problems but also discuss solutions.  This includes small group discussions and activities that are a planned part of the class.  If you are not in class the day we do the activity, you will lose the points.

 

One part of participation that students need to understand is respect.  Your participation grade can be lowered by arguing with classmates or the instructor, disrupting class with unnecessary remarks or private conversations, using profanity or general rude behavior.  Participation is about sharing ideas not negativity and arguing.  These activities are worth up to 100 points over the course of the semester.

 

2.      Exams – There will be four regular exams and the final exam.  The regular exams are worth up to 100 points each and can be either/or multiple choice and short answer.  The final exam is worth up to 200 points and may contain both multiple choice and short answer.  Each regular exam is scheduled for one hour; the final exam is scheduled for two hours.

 

3.      Short papers – There will be three short papers – 3 typed, double-spaced pages with font size no greater than 12 point.  Please refer to the attached Paper Assignment Sheet for directions in writing the paper, content, and due date.  Each paper is worth up to 100 points.

 

Assessment points possible for each item:

      4 exams @ 100 points each                 400 points

      Final exam @ 200 points                       200 points

      Three papers @ 100 points                   300 points

      Ten Class Activities @ 10 points           100 points

                               Total                           1000 points

 

Grading Scale:

                                                A+        970 – 1000                              C+       770 – 799

                                                A          930 – 969                                C         730 – 769

                                                A-         900 – 929                                C-        700 – 729

                                                B+       870 – 899                                D+       670 – 699

                                                B          830 – 869                                D         630 – 669

                                                B-        800 – 829                                D-        570 – 629

                                                                                                            F          000 – 569

 

Miscellaneous Information:

1.      In the event that the university is closed on the day of a scheduled exam, the exam will be held the next class session.

2.      Be on time for the exams.  If you arrive late, you will only have the remaining part of the hour to complete the exam.

3.      Your papers are due on specific dates.  If it is late, you will lose points (5 points for each day late).  Any paper turned in two weeks late will receive no credit.

4.      I expect you to keep a copy of the syllabus and refer to if often.  I do not always remind you when materials are due.

5.      In the event that you are unable to take a scheduled exam, a make up exam will only be scheduled if you have a documented and serious reason for the missed exam such as death in the family, illness, or school sponsored activity.  Make up exams must be scheduled with the instructor.

6.      I do not like when students “straggle” into the class, it could negatively affect your grade.

7.      I expect you will all be willing to discuss these topics with civility, respect, and decorum.  Hurtful, hateful, bigoted, or disrespectful comments and behaviors will not be tolerated and your grade can also be affected by this. 

8.      Plagiarism will be deal with by either a lower grade or failure of the class if the plagiarism is severe.  Cheating will also be dealt with in a similar way to plagiarism.

 

 

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 

Week 1:

   Jan. 12 to       Introductions, class procedures, syllabus, grading, etc.

   Jan. 15           Read Chapter 1 (Sociological Perspectives on Social Problems), pps. 2 – 25

                        Read Chapter 2 (Problems of Physical Health), pps 26 – 59

Week 2:

   Jan. 19 to       Continue Ch.2 and Read Chapter 3 (Mental Illness), pps. 60 -87

   Jan. 22           Exam #1 covering Chapter 1, 2, 3, lecture, other material (1 hr) scheduled

                        for Jan. 22

Week 3:

   Jan. 26 to      Read Chapter 4 (Sex-Related Social Problems), pps. 88 – 119

   Jan. 29

                                                           

Week 4:

   Feb. 2 to        Read Chapter 5 (Alcohol and Other Drugs), pps. 120 – 149

   Feb. 5            PAPER #1 DUE                                                              

 

 

 

 

Week 5:

   Feb. 9 to        Read Chapter 6 (Crime and Criminals), pps. 150 – 187. 

   Feb.12           Exam #2 covering Chapter 4, 5, 6, lecture, other materials (1 hr) scheduled for Feb. 12

                       

Week 6:

   Feb. 16 to      Read Chapter 7 (Violence), pps. 188 – 219

   Feb. 19         

 

Week 7:

   Feb. 23    to   Read Chapter 8 (Poverty Amid Affluence), pps. 220 – 252

   Feb. 26                                                                                             

 

Feb. 28 – March 7 – Spring Break.  Enjoy yourselves!

 

Week 8:

   Mar.  8 to       Read Chapter 9 (Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination), pps. 254 – 285

   Mar. 11          Exam #3 covering chapter 7, 8, 9, lecture, other materials (1 hr)  scheduled for March 11

                       

Week 9:

   Mar. 15 to      Read Chapter 10 (Sex Roles and Inequality), pps. 286 – 311

   Mar. 18         

 

 

Week 10:

   Mar. 22 to      Read Chapter 11 (An Aging Society), pps. 312 – 339

   Mar. 25          PAPER #2 DUE

                 

Week 11:

   Mar. 29 to      Read Chapter 12 (The Changing Family), pps. 340 – 367

   Apr. 1            Exam #4 covering chapter 10, 11, 12, lecture, other material (1 hr) scheduled for April 1.  (This is not an April Fool – test is for real!)

                       

Week 12:

   Apr. 5  to        Read Chapter 13 (Problems in Education), pps. 368 – 395

   Apr. 8           

 

Week 13:

   Apr. 12           Read Chapter 14 (Problems of Work and Economy), pps. 396 – 423

   Apr. 15           Read Chapter 17 (Technology and Environment), pps. 476 – 505

                        PAPER #3 DUE

 

Week 14:

   Apr. 19 to       Read Chapter 18 (War and Terrorism), pps. 506 – 528

   Apr. 22          

 

Final week:

   Apr.               Final Exam covering Ch. 13, 14, 17, 18 and notes (2 hours)