Cultural Diversity

SOC 103 Fall, 2004

 

Instructor: Nancy Bartkowski

Email address: nbartkowski@lssu.edu

Telephone (office): 635-2159

Office Hours: Room 233 Shouldice Library, Tu/Thr 10:30-noon; Wed 10-noon,

Text: The Dynamics of Inequality: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in the United States by Patricia Gagne and Richard Tewksbury. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2003.

ISBN: 0-13-097637-7

Course Description:

This course introduces the student to racial, ethnic, gender, and social class variation within the United States and the global community. The course looks at the historical features of diversity and looks to the future of cultural diversity in the workplace, education, and social life. The course will present the different sides of racism, sexism, poverty, and sexuality in the US through case studies, journal articles, and the text.

 

Course Objectives:

There are three main objectives of this course:

1.      To understand the societal conditions which encourage and perpetuate cultural diversity and cultural inequality.

2. To improve your understanding of race, ethnicity, gender, and social inequality in the United States.

3 To look at the implications for cultural diversity and social justice in the major social institutions.

 

Course Requirements:

1.      Attendance Attendance is important for all class sessions. We will have classroom activities that are a planned part of the class. These activities, done in class, are worth up to 100 points. If you are not in class the day they are done, you will lose the points as they cannot be turned in another day without an approved excuse.

2.      Exams There will be 4 exams spaced throughout the semester covering text material, lecture material, and handouts. Each exam will be multiple choice and/or short answer for a total of 100 points per exam. Please bring a Scantron sheet for the exam. All exams will total up to 400 points per semester.

3.      Short paper There will be one short paper (up to three pages) concerning a topic relating to cultural diversity. The topic will be handed out in class. Not only will the grade be based on content but also on presentation (spelling, sentence structure, and grammar). The paper is worth up to 100 points.

 

Grading Scale:

A+ (98 -100%) 589 - 600 C+ (77 80%) 462 - 479

A (93 - 98%) 558 - 588 C (73 77%) 438 - 461

A- (90 - 93%) 540 - 557 C- (70 73%) 420 - 437

B+ (87 - 90%) 522 - 539 D+ (67 70%) 402 - 419

B (83 - 87%) 498 - 521 D (60 68%) 360 - 401

B- (80 - 83%) 480 - 497 D- (56 59%) 336 - 359

F (00 55%) 000 - 335

 

Miscellaneous Information:

1.      If the university is closed on the day of a scheduled exam, the exam will be held the next class session.

2.      Be on time for the exams. If you arrive late, you will only have the remaining part of that class to complete the exam.

3.      Your paper is due on a specific date. If it is late, you will lose points. Any paper turned in two weeks late will receive no credit.

4.      Keep a copy of the syllabus and refer to if often for when material is due.

5.      If you are unable to take a scheduled exam, a make up exam will only be scheduled if you have a documented and serious reason for the missed exam such as death in the family, illness, or school sponsored activity.

6.      Be on time for class.

7.      I expect you will all be willing to discuss these topics with civility, respect, and decorum. Hurtful, hateful, bigoted, or disrespectful comments and behaviors will not be tolerated and your grade can also be affected by this. We want discussion, not bigotry.

8.      Plagiarism will be deal with by either a lower grade or failure if the plagiarism is severe.

 

 

 

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 

Week 1: Personal experiences of Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality

Aug 31 Introductions, class procedures, syllabus, grading, etc.

Sept 2 Read Preface, Chapter 1, pps. vii 29

 

Week 2: The Perspectives

Sept 9 Read Ch. 6, pps. 393 412; 418 - 442

Week 3: Terminology and Inequalities perpetuated in Society

Sept 14 Read Ch. 2, pps. 30 - 88

Sept 16 Continue and review for Exam 1

 

Week 4: EXAM #1 and Movie

Sept 21 Exam #1 covering Ch. 1, 2, 6 and lecture material

Sept 23 Primal Mind review sheet

 

Week 5: Inequalities in Society

Sept 28 Read Ch. 3, pps. 89 111; 139 - 142

Sept 30 Continue and Guest Speaker

 

Week 6: Economic Barriers

Oct 5 Read Ch. 4, pps. 143 161; 167 - 203

Oct 7 Continue

 

Week 7: Healthcare Barriers and EXAM #2

Oct 12 Read Ch. 4, pps. 204 221; 242 -260

Oct 14 Exam #2 covering parts of Ch. 3, 4 and lectures

Week 8: Educational Barriers

Oct 19 Read Ch. 4, pps. 263 265; 269 - 288

Oct 21 Guest Speaker

 

Week 9: Criminal Justice Barriers

Oct 26 Read Ch. 4, pps 289 - 332

Oct 28 Continue

 

Week 10: Violence Barriers

Nov. 2 Read Ch. 5, pps. 338 341; 353 358; 373 - 392,

Nov 4 Continue

 

Week 11: Movie and Discussion

Nov 9 American History X

Nov 11 Continue

 

Week 12: EXAM #3

Nov 16 Exam #3 covering parts of Ch 4, 5 and lectures

Nov 18 Being White in U.S. society

 

Week 13: Other Types of Diversity

Nov 23 Handouts

********* PAPER DUE ********

 

Week 14: Search for Justice

Nov 30 Read Ch. 7, pps. 447 -493

Dec 2 Continue

 

Week 15: Future of Cultural Diversity

Dec 7 Cultural Diversity in your career

Dec 9 Wrap up, evaluations and review for Exam # 4

 

FINAL WEEK: Exam #4 Covering Ch. 7, handouts and lectures

To be announced