SO101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

 SYLLABUS

LSSU Dept. of Sociology and Social Work

Autumn 2004

Instructor: Dr. G. F. Dobbertin

Office: Library 326

Office hours: M,W,F@12pm

                         M,W @ 2pm

 

General Course Description

First, this course will introduce the student to the concepts, issues and techniques of Sociology. The student's vocabulary will expand as the theories of the social sciences are introduced.

Second, important institutions like stratification by class, race, gender, age, ethnicity, and social class will be examined in the light of empirical evidence.

Third, the student will be encouraged to view social arrangements with a critical eye. This is the objective of Sociology.

This course will examine basic social structures including the economic, family, educational, social welfare, criminal justice, and health care system. Social processes examined will include social mobility, group formation, urbanization, industrialization, socialization, development of deviance, creation of social movements, and cultural change.

 

 

Textbook:

In Conflict and Order, 10th ed. by Eitzen and Zinn

 

Exams

NOTE: You must take the final exam when it is scheduled for your class. You can not take it with another SO101 section.

There will be six tests worth 50 points each for a total of 300 points in the course. The final exam is not comprehensive; it will simply be the last section test. All tests are made up of multiple choice and true-false questions. You must bring a "Scantron" answer sheet to each test. Buy them at the bookstore. These "Scantron" sheets must be written upon by number 2 graphite pencils only; ink will not be accepted.

 

Grades

The student's letter grade for the course will be determined by the total number of points scored on all tests. Here is the grading scale:

 

                                Total points                    Grade in

                                 scored in SO101             SO101

                      300-260                                A

                                 259-225                                B

                                 224-186                                C

185-150                                  D

 

 

 

 

"Make-up" Exams

If for any reason you must miss a test, you must first get permission from Dr. Dobbertin. Permission will be granted only if the student  documents  the reason for missing the test. A "make-up" test will be scheduled. These "make-up" tests will not be corrected until the week of the FINAL EXAM.

 

SCHEDULE OF READINGS AND TESTS

                 Tests                      Chapters covered                        Date of test

                

                 1                             1-2-3                                               Sept. 24 Friday

                 2                              6-7                                                    Oct. 8 Friday

                 3                              8-9-10                                             Oct. 29 Friday

                 4                              11                                                    Nov. 5 Friday

                 5                              13-14                                             Nov. 22 Monday

                 6        final test       16-17   10am section is Mon. 12-13-04 @ 10am

                                                            11am section is  Wed. 12-15-04 @ 10am

                                                                 

                                                                    

Tentative nature of syllabus:

We might not be able to follow this syllabus as it is . Unforeseen circumstances might cause Dr. Dobbertin to reschedule some of the readings or tests. Such rescheduling will be announced in class. It is the student’s responsibility to  keep informed of these changes in the schedule, if they occur.

 

Cell phones

If you carry a cell phone, put the alarm function on “vibrate” while in class. Do not allow the cell phone to “ring” during class. If you get a call while in class, do not answer it. Do not talk over the cell phone while in class. If you are expecting a call during the class period which is so important that you must answer it and talk, then skip class that day and get the notes from another student.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Sociology                                                                             SO 101

Dr. R.C. Crandall                                                                                                                                             Fall 2004

Course Description

 

An introduction to the basic concepts of sociology.  Explanation of human behavior which emphasizes human groups, institutions, social change, and social forces.

 

This course will examine basic social structures including the economic, family, educational, social welfare, criminal justice, and health care system. Social processes examined will include social mobility, group formation, urbanization, industrialization, socialization, development of deviance, creation of social movements, and cultural change. Social stratification by race, ethnicity, class, gender, and age will be examined.

 

The student will learn the concepts, theories, research techniques of Sociology and will learn to apply analytical thinking skills.

 

 

Textbook

 

Sociology (ninth edition) - Rodney Stark

 

Course Objectives

 

1.  To provide students with a background in sociology that will provide the foundation for other sociology courses.

2.  To provide students with an understanding of sociological concepts and terms.

3.  To provide students with an understanding of the functioning of society.

 

Schedule

 

Week                                                               Date                 Monday                       Wednesday

01                                                                    08/30               Introduction                  Chapter 01

02                                                                    09/06               No Class                      Chapter 02

03                                                                    09/13               Chapter 03                   Exam Period 1 

04                                                                    09/20               Chapter 04                   Chapter 05

05                                                                    09/27               Chapter 06                   Exam Period 2 

06                                                                    10/04               Chapter 07                   Chapter 08

07                                                                    10/11               Chapter 09                   Exam Period 3 

08                                                                    10/18               Chapter 10                   Chapter 11

09                                                                    10/25               Chapter 12                   Exam Period 4 

10                                                                    11/01               Chapter 13                   Chapter 14

11                                                                    11/08               Chapter 15                   Exam Period 5 

12                                                                    11/15               Chapter 16                   Chapter 17

13                                                                    11/22               Chapter 18                   No Class         

14                                                                    11/29               Exam Period 6  MU Chapters 01 - 03

15                                                                    12/06               MU Chapters 04 - 09   MU Chapters 10 - 15

16                                                                    12/13               MU Chapters 16 - 18,

 Thursday                                                         12/16/04          3:00 - 5:00 pm

 

Examinations

 

There will be a separate exam over chapters 1 through 18.  The exams will be grouped into six exam periods, with three chapter exams per period. Each exam will consist of 10 multiple choice questions.  Each question is worth 4 points, each exam 40 points.

 


If you miss an exam, or want to retake an exam, there will be a make-up exam for each chapter later in the course. The make-up exams will consist of 4 essay questions per chapter.  Essay exams are graded primarily on content.  However, I expect your answers to be in complete sentences, and for words to be speellled corectly.  You will lose points for incomplete sentences and sppelingg errors.  Each question will be worth 10 points, each exam 40 points.  This is an opportunity, not an entitlement.  If you re-take an exam the SECOND score will be used.

 

The exams will cover the textbook, handouts, AV presentations, lectures, and class discussions.

Grades

 

You have a choice of two grading options: liberal or conservative.

 

1.  Liberal or I love big government: The high scoring students will Acontribute@some of Atheir@points to low scoring students. Students who select this option must complete form LIBERAL-IN-04 in triplicate, and send it via certified mail to the instructor by 01 August 2004. The details of this option are complex.  Thus, every student selecting this option will be provided a 9,352 page instruction booklet and two lawyers.

 

2.  Conservative or keep your hands off MY points: Grades are determined by ability and effort.  The points YOU earn will determine the grade YOU receive!  Students who do not select Option 1 will automatically be placed in Option 2.

 

For those in the conservative grading option, final grades will be determined by the total number of points earned in the course.  Students need to take 15 of the 18 chapter exams.  For those who take more than 15 exams, the lowest score(s) will be thrown out. There are 600 points possible in the course (15 exams each worth 40 points = 600). The grading scale is listed below:    

 

596-600 = A+

545-595 = A     

540-544 = A-   

536-539 = B+   

485-535 = B     

480-484 = B-    

476-479 = C+               

425-475 = C                 

420-424 = C-                

416-419 = D+               

365-415 = D     

360-364 = D-   

000-359 = F

Relevant Information

 

01. Telephone/Office:

Office: Library 306

Telephone: 635-2103

Office Hours:    MW 2:30 - 3:00 p.m., TR 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.

02. Class Information:                                                              

Day/Time:         MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m.  

Classroom:       CRW 205

03. Attendance is required for all classes. You will lose points for missing class!

04. There may be some short in-class extra-credit assignments. Points from any extra-credit assignments will be applied to all grades except AA+@.

05. Keep all of your exams for one term beyond the completion of this course.

06. Papers, exams, etc. are only returned in-class.  Those that are not picked up in-class are rapidly discard.  Exam scores and course grades are NOT given out over the phone or via email.  Disputes about exam scores MUST be dealt with Ain writing@ within 48 hours after the return of the exam.

07. Purchase the book by the first class period. Notify me if there is a problem obtaining a textbook.

08. If you want to drop the course you will need to fill out a drop slip or you will receive an "F" in the course. If you want to drop the course, the secretary in the School of Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences can sign the drop form.

09. All exams will be as scheduled unless you are notified otherwise. In the event that an exam cannot be held as scheduled, it will be given during the next class period.

10.  Be on time for exams.  If you are late you may not be given an exam.

11.  I do not sign forms (i.e., athletics, etc.) that deal with grades, attendance, etc.

 

Warning: This class may be hazardous to your GPA.  Grade inflation stops with this course!  Additionally, the instructor makes no pretense, and few attempts of being PC (politically correct).  The instructor will, however, attempt to equally offend all sexes, ages, races, ethnic groups, sexual orientations, and nationalities covered by the PC stupidity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL PROBLEMS- Spring 2004

SOC 102

 

Instructor:                     Nancy Bartkowski

Email address:             nancy.bartkowski@davenport.edu

Telephone (home):      (906) 635-8275  (emergency only)

Office Hours:                Room 304 (Adjunct Office), Shouldice Library, Tuesday and Thursday from 11:30 AM -1:30 PM

 

Text:                              Social Problems by William Kornblum and Joseph Julian, 10 ed.  Prentice Hall, New Jersey: 2001.           

                                   

Course Description and Objective:          

This course will introduce the critical social problems of our time.  The problems will be evaluated using the different theoretical perspectives.  The student will learn how the social problem impacts society and what solutions have been proposed.  The student will critically evaluate the solutions and propose alternative ones.  The goal of this class is to identify and investigate areas of crime, violence, family, discrimination, and education. 

 

Course Requirements:

1.      Classroom Activities   Active participation is crucial to this class.  We want to talk not only about the problems but also discuss solutions.  This includes small group discussions and activities that are a planned part of the class.  If you are not in class the day we do the activity, you will lose the points.

 

One part of participation that students need to understand is respect.  Your participation grade can be lowered by arguing with classmates or the instructor, disrupting class with unnecessary remarks or private conversations, using profanity or general rude behavior.  Participation is about sharing ideas not negativity and arguing.  These activities are worth up to 100 points over the course of the semester.

 

2.      Exams – There will be four regular exams and the final exam.  The regular exams are worth up to 100 points each and can be either/or multiple choice and short answer.  The final exam is worth up to 200 points and may contain both multiple choice and short answer.  Each regular exam is scheduled for one hour; the final exam is scheduled for two hours.

 

3.      Short papersThere will be three short papers – 3 typed, double-spaced pages with font size no greater than 12 point.  Please refer to the attached Paper Assignment Sheet for directions in writing the paper, content, and due date.  Each paper is worth up to 100 points.

 

Assessment points possible for each item:

      4 exams @ 100 points each                 400 points

      Final exam @ 200 points                       200 points

      Three papers @ 100 points                   300 points

      Ten Class Activities @ 10 points           100 points

                               Total                           1000 points

 

Grading Scale:

                                                A+        970 – 1000                              C+       770 – 799

                                                A          930 – 969                                C         730 – 769

                                                A-         900 – 929                                C-        700 – 729

                                                B+       870 – 899                                D+       670 – 699

                                                B          830 – 869                                D         630 – 669

                                                B-        800 – 829                                D-        570 – 629

                                                                                                            F          000 – 569

 

Miscellaneous Information:

1.      In the event that the university is closed on the day of a scheduled exam, the exam will be held the next class session.

2.      Be on time for the exams.  If you arrive late, you will only have the remaining part of the hour to complete the exam.

3.      Your papers are due on specific dates.  If it is late, you will lose points (5 points for each day late).  Any paper turned in two weeks late will receive no credit.

4.      I expect you to keep a copy of the syllabus and refer to if often.  I do not always remind you when materials are due.

5.      In the event that you are unable to take a scheduled exam, a make up exam will only be scheduled if you have a documented and serious reason for the missed exam such as death in the family, illness, or school sponsored activity.  Make up exams must be scheduled with the instructor.

6.      I do not like when students “straggle” into the class, it could negatively affect your grade.

7.      I expect you will all be willing to discuss these topics with civility, respect, and decorum.  Hurtful, hateful, bigoted, or disrespectful comments and behaviors will not be tolerated and your grade can also be affected by this. 

8.      Plagiarism will be deal with by either a lower grade or failure of the class if the plagiarism is severe.  Cheating will also be dealt with in a similar way to plagiarism.

 

 

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 

Week 1:

   Jan. 12 to       Introductions, class procedures, syllabus, grading, etc.

   Jan. 15           Read Chapter 1 (Sociological Perspectives on Social Problems), pps. 2 – 25

                        Read Chapter 2 (Problems of Physical Health), pps 26 – 59

Week 2:

   Jan. 19 to       Continue Ch.2 and Read Chapter 3 (Mental Illness), pps. 60 -87

   Jan. 22           Exam #1 covering Chapter 1, 2, 3, lecture, other material (1 hr) scheduled

                        for Jan. 22

Week 3:

   Jan. 26 to      Read Chapter 4 (Sex-Related Social Problems), pps. 88 – 119

   Jan. 29

                                                           

Week 4:

   Feb. 2 to        Read Chapter 5 (Alcohol and Other Drugs), pps. 120 – 149

   Feb. 5            PAPER #1 DUE                                                              

 

 

 

 

Week 5:

   Feb. 9 to        Read Chapter 6 (Crime and Criminals), pps. 150 – 187. 

   Feb.12           Exam #2 covering Chapter 4, 5, 6, lecture, other materials (1 hr) scheduled for Feb. 12

                       

Week 6:

   Feb. 16 to      Read Chapter 7 (Violence), pps. 188 – 219

   Feb. 19         

 

Week 7:

   Feb. 23    to   Read Chapter 8 (Poverty Amid Affluence), pps. 220 – 252

   Feb. 26                                                                                             

 

Feb. 28 – March 7 – Spring Break.  Enjoy yourselves!

 

Week 8:

   Mar.  8 to       Read Chapter 9 (Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination), pps. 254 – 285

   Mar. 11          Exam #3 covering chapter 7, 8, 9, lecture, other materials (1 hr)  scheduled for March 11

                       

Week 9:

   Mar. 15 to      Read Chapter 10 (Sex Roles and Inequality), pps. 286 – 311

   Mar. 18         

 

 

Week 10:

   Mar. 22 to      Read Chapter 11 (An Aging Society), pps. 312 – 339

   Mar. 25          PAPER #2 DUE

                 

Week 11:

   Mar. 29 to      Read Chapter 12 (The Changing Family), pps. 340 – 367

   Apr. 1            Exam #4 covering chapter 10, 11, 12, lecture, other material (1 hr) scheduled for April 1.  (This is not an April Fool – test is for real!)

                       

Week 12:

   Apr. 5  to        Read Chapter 13 (Problems in Education), pps. 368 – 395

   Apr. 8           

 

Week 13:

   Apr. 12           Read Chapter 14 (Problems of Work and Economy), pps. 396 – 423

   Apr. 15           Read Chapter 17 (Technology and Environment), pps. 476 – 505

                        PAPER #3 DUE

 

Week 14:

   Apr. 19 to       Read Chapter 18 (War and Terrorism), pps. 506 – 528

   Apr. 22          

 

Final week:

   Apr.               Final Exam covering Ch. 13, 14, 17, 18 and notes (2 hours)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural Diversity

SOC 103 – Fall, 2004

 

Instructor:                     Nancy Bartkowski

Email address:             nbartkowski@lssu.edu

Telephone (office):     635-2159

Office Hours:                Room 233 Shouldice Library, Tu/Thr 10:30-noon; Wed 10-noon,

Text:                              The Dynamics of Inequality: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in the United States by Patricia Gagne and Richard Tewksbury.  Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2003. 

ISBN: 0-13-097637-7

                                   

Course Description:

This course introduces the student to racial, ethnic, gender, and social class variation within the United States and the global community.  The course looks at the historical features of diversity and looks to the future of cultural diversity in the workplace, education, and social life.  The course will present the different sides of racism, sexism, poverty, and sexuality in the US through case studies, journal articles, and the text.

 

Course Objectives: 

There are three main objectives of this course:

1.      To understand the societal conditions which encourage and perpetuate cultural diversity and cultural inequality.

      2.   To improve your understanding of race, ethnicity, gender, and social inequality in the United States.

      3   To look at the implications for cultural diversity and social justice in the major social institutions.

 

Course Requirements:

4.      Attendance – Attendance is important for all class sessions.  We will have classroom activities that are a planned part of the class.  These activities, done in class, are worth up to 100 points.  If you are not in class the day they are done, you will lose the points as they cannot be turned in another day without an approved excuse. 

5.      Exams – There will be 4 exams spaced throughout the semester covering text material, lecture material, and handouts.  Each exam will be multiple choice and/or short answer for a total of 100 points per exam. Please bring a Scantron sheet for the exam.   All exams will total up to 400 points per semester. 

6.      Short paper – There will be one short paper (up to three pages) concerning a topic relating to cultural diversity.  The topic will be handed out in class.  Not only will the grade be based on content but also on presentation (spelling, sentence structure, and grammar).  The paper is worth up to 100 points.

 

Grading Scale:

                           A+   (98 -100%)        589 - 600            C+    (77 – 80%)      462 - 479

                           A    (93 -   98%)       558 - 588            C      (73 – 77%)      438 - 461

                           A-    (90 -  93%)        540 - 557            C-     (70 – 73%)      420 - 437

                           B+   (87 -  90%)       522 - 539            D+    (67 – 70%)      402 - 419

                           B     (83 -  87%)        498 - 521            D      (60 – 68%)      360 - 401

                           B-    (80 -  83%)       480 - 497            D-     (56 – 59%)      336 - 359

                                                                                       F       (00 – 55%)      000 - 335

 

Miscellaneous Information:

9.      If the university is closed on the day of a scheduled exam, the exam will be held the next class session.

10.  Be on time for the exams.  If you arrive late, you will only have the remaining part of that class to complete the exam.

11.  Your paper is due on a specific date.  If it is late, you will lose points.  Any paper turned in two weeks late will receive no credit.

12.  Keep a copy of the syllabus and refer to if often for when material is due.

13.  If you are unable to take a scheduled exam, a make up exam will only be scheduled if you have a documented and serious reason for the missed exam such as death in the family, illness, or school sponsored activity.

14.  Be on time for class.

15.  I expect you will all be willing to discuss these topics with civility, respect, and decorum.  Hurtful, hateful, bigoted, or disrespectful comments and behaviors will not be tolerated and your grade can also be affected by this.  We want discussion, not bigotry.

16.  Plagiarism will be deal with by either a lower grade or failure if the plagiarism is severe.

 

 

 

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 

Week 1:       Personal experiences of Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality

   Aug  31      Introductions, class procedures, syllabus, grading, etc.

   Sept   2      Read Preface, Chapter 1, pps. vii – 29

 

Week 2:       The Perspectives

   Sept  9       Read Ch. 6, pps. 393 – 412; 418 - 442

                    

Week 3:       Terminology and Inequalities perpetuated in Society

   Sept 14      Read Ch. 2, pps. 30 - 88

   Sept 16      Continue and review for Exam 1

 

Week 4:       EXAM #1 and Movie

   Sept 21      Exam #1 covering Ch. 1, 2, 6 and lecture material

   Sept 23      Primal Mind – review sheet

 

Week 5:       Inequalities in Society

   Sept 28      Read Ch. 3, pps. 89 – 111; 139 - 142

   Sept 30      Continue and Guest Speaker

 

Week 6:       Economic Barriers

   Oct  5        Read Ch. 4, pps. 143 – 161; 167 - 203

   Oct  7        Continue

 

Week 7:       Healthcare Barriers and EXAM #2

   Oct 12       Read Ch. 4, pps. 204 – 221; 242 -260

   Oct 14       Exam #2 covering parts of Ch. 3, 4 and lectures

                    

Week 8:       Educational Barriers

   Oct 19       Read Ch. 4, pps. 263 – 265; 269 - 288

   Oct 21       Guest Speaker

 

Week 9:       Criminal Justice Barriers

   Oct 26       Read Ch. 4, pps 289 - 332

   Oct 28       Continue

 

Week 10:     Violence Barriers

   Nov. 2        Read Ch. 5, pps. 338 –341; 353 – 358; 373 - 392, 

   Nov 4         Continue

 

Week 11:     Movie and Discussion

   Nov  9        American History X

   Nov 11       Continue

 

Week 12:     EXAM #3

   Nov 16       Exam #3 covering parts of Ch 4, 5 and lectures

   Nov 18       Being White in U.S. society

 

Week 13:     Other Types of Diversity

   Nov 23       Handouts 

                     ********* PAPER DUE ********

 

Week 14:     Search for Justice

   Nov 30       Read Ch. 7, pps.  447 -493

   Dec  2       Continue

 

Week 15:     Future of Cultural Diversity

   Dec 7        Cultural Diversity in your career

   Dec 9        Wrap up, evaluations  and review for Exam # 4

 

FINAL WEEK:  Exam #4 Covering Ch. 7, handouts and lectures

                     To be announced

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social Research Methods                                                                             SO/SW 202

                                                                               LSSU

Dr. R.C. Crandall                                                                                           Spring [sic] 2003

 

Course Description

 

Introduction to the basic methods of social research.

 

Course Objectives

 

01.  To introduce the scientific method.

02.  To present an introduction to social research methods.

03.  To demonstrate the importance of social research, both in science and in “everyday life.”

04.    To incorporate basic computer-related social research skills, including data base management, and    

       text and reference storage and retrieval systems.

05.  To learn procedures for gathering and organizing sociological information

06.  To communicate the basic ethical guidelines in research.

 

Textbook

 

The Practice of Social Research (Ninth Edition) - Earl Babbie

 

Schedule

 

Tuesday                                                          Thursday

01.  01/13                                                                                Introduction                              Chapter 1

02.  01/20                                                                                Chapter 2                                 Exam Period 1

03.  01/27                                                                                Chapter 3                                 Chapter 4

04.  02/03                                                                                Exam Period 2                          Chapter 5

05.  02/10                                                                                Chapter 6                                 Exam Period 3

06.  02/17                                                                                Chapter 7                                 Chapter 8

07.  02/24                                                                                Exam Period 4                          Chapter 9

08.  03/03                                                                                No Class                                  No Class

09.  03/10                                                                                No Class                                  No Class

10.  03/17                                                                                Chapter 10                               Exam Period 5 

11.  03/24                                                                                Chapter 11                               Chapter 12

12.  03/31                                                                                Exam Period 6                          Chapter 18

13.  04/07                                                                                Chapter 19                               Appendixes A, 

                                                                                                                                                B, C, & J

14.  04/14                                                                                Exam Period 7                          MU 1 & 2

15.  04/21                                                                                MU 3 & 4                                MU 5 & 6

16.  04/28                                                                                MU 7, Friday 05/03/03, 7:30 a.m.

 

Final Grade

 

You have the choice of two grading options: liberal or conservative

 

1.  Liberal: The high scoring students will “contribute”some of “their”points to low scoring students.   Students who select this option must complete form LIBERALIN03 in triplicate, and send it via certified mail to the instructor by 01 January 2003

 

2.  Conservative: Grades are determined by ability and effort.  The points YOU earn will determine the grade YOU receive!  Students who do not select Option 1 will automatically be placed in Option 2.

 


Your final grade will be determined by your performance on 15 “chapter” exams (Chapters 1-12, 18, 19 and appendices A, B, C, & J).  Each exam will be composed of four essay questions, and each question will be worth 10 points.  Each exam is worth 40 points.  There are 600 points possible in the course (15 exams x 40 = 600).  The final grading scale is as follows:

 

596-600 = A+

545-595 = A     

540-544 = A-   

536-539 = B+   

485-535 = B     

480-484 = B-    

476-479 = C+               

425-475 = C                 

420-424 = C-                

416-419 = D+               

365-415 = D     

360-364 = D-   

000-359 = F     

 

Relevant Information

 

01. Telephone/Office:

Office: Library 306

Telephone: 635-2103

Office Hours:    T, R 7:30 - 8:00 a.m., W 7:30-11:30 a.m.

02. Class Information:                                                               

Day/Time:         8:00 - 9:15 a.m.

Classroom:        CAS 108

03. Attendance is required for all classes. You will lose points for missing class!

04. There may be some short in-class extra-credit assignments. Points from any extra-credit assignments will be applied to all grades except “A+”.

05. Keep all of your exams for one term beyond the completion of this course.

06. Papers, exams, etc. are only returned in-class.  Those that are not picked up in-class are rapidly discard.  Exam scores and course grades are NOT given out over the phone.  Disputes about exam scores MUST be dealt with “in writing” within 48 hours of the return of the exam.

07. Purchase the book by the first class period. Notify me if there is a problem obtaining a textbook.

08. If you want to drop the course you will need to fill out a drop slip or you will receive an "F" in the course. If you want to drop the course, the secretary in the School of Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences can sign your drop form.

09. All exams will be as scheduled unless you are notified otherwise. In the event that an exam cannot be held as scheduled, it will be given during the next class period.

10.  Be on time for exams.  If you are late you may not be given an exam.

11.  I do not sign forms (i.e., athletics, etc.) that deal with grades, attendance, etc.

 

Warning: This class may be hazardous to your GPA.  Grade inflation stops with this course!  Additionally, the instructor makes no pretense, and few attempts of being PC (politically correct).  The instructor will, however, attempt to equally offend all sexes, ages, races, ethnic groups, sexual orientations, and nationalities covered by the PC stupidity.

 

 

 

SO238 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Syllabus for Fall 2004

Dr. Leslie Dobbertin

OVERVIEW

In this course, you will learn to view human behavior through the theory of symbolic interactionism, the social psychology of sociology.   Using this theory and its concepts, you will learn how society “gets into” people and how people reproduce and change society in their day-to-day actions.  In learning about symbolic interactionism, you will explore the linguistic roots of human nature and will learn how mind, self, society, deviance, and truth are created through interaction.

 

SO238

Social processes we will examine include socialization in the family and in the educational system, connections between culture and personality, formation of attitudes, creation of deviance, social control, formation of groups including social change grups, nature of communication, social continuity and change and social mobility.  We will also examine the cultural variation and the social psychological aspects of stratification by class, race, ethnicity, and gender.

 

You will also be given the opportunity to apply the theory, symbolic interactionism, to a social setting through doing ethnographic research as part of the lab. Field study techniques will be used to gather data, and the student will practice analytical and organizational skills used by sociologists.

 

An active approach to learning is taken in this course.  You are expected to apply and critique the ideas presented in the lecture and the readings.  

 

READINGS

You will read the following two books.

   Charon, Joel M.  2003.  Symbolic Interactionism, 8th ed.  Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

   Articles to be handed out in class from Cahill, Spencer E., Ed.  2004.  Inside Social Life: Readings n

Sociological Psychology and Microsociology, 4th ed.  Los Angeles, California: Roxbury Pub. Co.

.

EARNING THE GRADE

The credit available through completing various tasks and the grading scale for the course are given below. Participation credit requires your presence and involvement in class.  No credit will be lost for the first two classes missed. For each subsequent class missed, 5 points will be lost. Credit for the report requires a presentation.  It is your responsibility to keep a record of points earned in the work you have done.

 

Tasks totaling 400 points

Charon & Cahill                                 Papers                                     Lab     

Test 1 (50)            _______                 Paper 1 (10)     ______            Lab Quiz 1 (10)    ______       

Test 2 (50)           _______                  Paper 2 (10)     ______            Lab Quiz 2 (10)    ______       

Test 3 (50)           _______                  Paper 3 (10)     ______            Lab Projects  (10)   ______    

Test 4 (50)           _______                  Paper 4 (10)     ______            Ethnographic Study (70)____     

 Final   (30)           _______                              Participation  (lab and lecture)  (30)   ______                         

               The grading scale:

Grade   Points               Percentage                               Grade   Points         Percentage

A     360 - 400             90 - 100%                               D     240 – 279            60 - 69

B     320 - 359              80 – 89                                   F      below 240            below 60

C     280 - 319              70 – 79

 

CAVEATS

Grades will be reported based on work completed during the semester.  An “I” or incomplete grade is possible only for unusual circumstances such as serious illness or death of member of the immediate family  (LSSU Catalogue,  p 13).  Students who cannot keep up with the work should drop the course. The deadline for dropping is the end of the 8th week (3rd week summer).

 

Cheating, including plagiarism, will result in a failing grade for the entire course.  Note that “…a student who cheats is subject to dismissal from the University” (LSSU Catalogue, p 15).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schedule SO238 Fall 2004

WEEK

Tuesday: lecture

Wednesday: lab

Thursday: lecture

1

8/31

9/1 Lab meets

9/2

2

9/7  HOLIDAY

9/8 Lab meets

9/9

3

9/14

 

9/15 Lab meets

Lab Quiz 1

9/16

4

9/21 Test 1: Charon, Ch.1-3 & articles in Cahill*

9/22  NO LAB, field work

9/23 

5

9/28

9/29  NO LAB, field work

9/30 Paper 1 due

6

10/5

10/6  Lab meets

10/7

7

10/12

10/13  Lab meets

  Lab Quiz 2

10/14

 

8

10/19 Test 2: Charon, Ch. 4–6 & articles in Cahill *

10/20   NO LAB, field

10/21  Paper 2 due

 

9

10/26

10/17   NO LAB, field

10/28

10

11/2

11/3     NO LAB , field

11/4 Paper 3 due

11

11/9 Quiz 3: Charon, Ch. 7–9 & articles in Cahill*

11/10   NO LAB, field

11/11

 

12

11/16

11/17 yes, class meets

Bring 3 copies of report

Collaborative reading

11/18

 

 

13

 

11/23

11/24

HOLIDAY

11/25

HOLIDAY

14

11/30

12/1 yes, class meets

presentations

All written reports due

12/2 Paper 4 due

15

12/7  Quiz 4: Charon Ch. 10 -13 & articles in Cahill*

12/8 yes, class meets

presentations continue

12/9

Review for final

Exam

week

Exam for lecture: Tuesday, December 14, 7:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

 No exam for lab

*Articles assigned from the Cahill reader

Test 1:  #2 “Culture and Psychology” by Jerome Bruner

#25 “The Contrasting Agendas of Black and White Sororities” by Alexandra Berkowitz

         and  Irene Padavic

Test 2: “#6 “Young Children’s Use of Racial and Ethnic Identities” by Debra Van Ausdale and

       Joe R. Feagin

#24 “Preadolescent Cliques, Friendships, and Identity” by Patricia and Peter Adler

Test 3: #26 “Working and Resisting at Route Restaurant” by Greta Foff Paules

            #18 “Wheelchair Users’ Interpersonal Management of Emotions” by Spencer E. Cahill

        and Robin Eggleston

Test 4: #32 “The Moral Career of the Mental Patient” by Erving Goffman

            #____Second article to be selected by the student.

 

 

 

SO302 STATISTICS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

TENTATIVE SYLLABUS

Fall 2004

Lake Superior State University

Dept. of Sociology and Social Work

Instructor: Dr. G. F. Dobbertin

Office: Library 326

Office Hours: M,W,F @ 12pm

                        M,W @ 2pm

 

Readings assignments will be handed out in class.

 

Course Objective:

The student will learn some of the jargon of Statistics; solve problems involving measures of central tendency and variability; and become familiar with the foundations of statistical inference, eg. Z-scores, t-scores, and chi square. This will require weekly homework assignments, and tests. A small calculator which is capable of adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing and finding square roots is a necessity. The weekly reading assignments are tentative. We might be required to change dates or drop assignments, depending on how fast or slowly we cover the material.

The student is strongly advised to do all of the homework problems

when they are assigned.

Do not wait until Dr. Dobbertin has worked them in class before doing them yourself at home. If you do, you will probably not understand what is going on in class and will find that you do not really know how to solve the problems when you see them on the tests.

 

Weekly Chapter Assignments                                                     Quiz

        1       chpt. 1-4 central tendency

        2       chpt. 5 variability

        3       chpt 5  variability-------------------------------------------Sept. 15

        4       chpt. 6 standard scores

        5       chpt. 8 normal distribution

        6       chpt.  6, 8----------------------------------------------------Oct. 6

        7       chpt. 11 Standard error of the mean

        8       chpt. 11

        9       chpt. 11-------------------------------------------------------Oct 27

        10     chpt. 12 t test

        11     chpt. 12

        12     chpt. 12-------------------------------------------------------Nov. 17

        13     chpt. 17 week of Thanksgiving break

        14     chpt. 17

15          chpt. 17 Chi square------------------------------------------Dec. 8

16          Final exam scheduled on Tue. Dec. 14th at 3:00pm.

 

 

 

Grading:

1-     This class must grade itself as a group. You must all agree upon a grading scheme, report it to me in writing, and each of you must sign this report.

2-     If any of you disagree with this report you may design an alternative grading scheme and report it to me in writing. You must sign this alternate report.

3-     No more than two grading schemes and accompanying reports will be accepted. Each student must sign one of these two reports, if there is an alternative report.

4-     The grading will be done at the time scheduled for the final exam: 3pm, Thurs., Dec. 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SO303 Contemporary Sociological Theory

Schedule for 2004

 

 

Week .

Text reading to be completed by the first meeting of the week.  Dictionary words will be assigned in class. Additional material will be handed out most weeks.

Your notes and record

1

 

 

 

2

Ch. 10 Parsons, Merton  and Functionalist Theory

 

 

3

Mills and the Sociological Imagination-handout

 

 

4

Ch.12 Mills on the Power Elite

 

 

5

Ch. 13 Domhoff on the Power Structure and the Governing Class

 

6

 

Mannheim and the sociology of knowledge-handou

 

7

Ch. 7. Gramsci, p 60-4

Ch.14 Althusser, p 108-9

 

8

Ch.17. Wilson and Willie on Race, Class, and Poverty

 

9

Handout: Dorothy Smith and standpoint theory

 

 

10

Handout: the Frankfurt School – critical theory

 

 

11

Ch. 18 Wallerstein and World Systems Theory

 

 

12

TBA

 

 

13

TBA

 

 

14

Tuesday: share best paper

Thursday:  review for final

 

 

finals week

Final Exam

 

 

 

Quiz dates:                                           Paper due dates:

Q1 -     1/23                                         P1 -     1/27

Q2 -     2/12                                         P2 -     2/17

Q3 -     2/26                                         P3 -     3/9

Q4 -    3/18                                         P4 -     3/23

Q5 -     4/1                                           P5 -     4/6

Q6 -     4/15                                         P6 -     4/20

SO303 Contemporary Sociological Theory

Syllabus, Fall 2004

 

Goals for you in this course. Mastering basic ideas of several key social thinkers of the current and past century will be your major task. Through this you will learn more about sociology and will also have the opportunity to improve a number of intellectual skills. Grappling with understanding concepts and theories and comparing their worth will help you develop critical thinking skills.  Presenting your ideas, listening and responding to your colleagues’ ideas, and writing short papers and essay quizzes will all help you communicate more effectively. Through using theories and concepts to make sense of specific social issues, you will scrutinize your society through more discerning eyes.

 

You will examine social institutions, such as the political, economic, family, educational, health care, social welfare, and criminal justice systems.  Characteristics of and trends in contemporary society, such as urbanization, industrialization social stratification by class, race, ethnicity and gender and population growth changes will be discussed, as will be discussed.  Fundamental social processes such as development and change of culture, personality, formation of groups, beliefs, and the process of communication will be included in our discussions. 

 

Specific tasks on which you will work.

>Every week you will read a short assignment from the text and/or handout and the definitions

  of  several words from the Dictionary.

>In class you will discuss ideas your have read, ask questions about what you have not

   understood, and work with colleagues to apply your ideas to specific situations. Opinions are  

   invited.

>Written quizzes every other week will give you the opportunity to assess your

   understanding of thetheories and concepts.

>A short written assignment every other week will give you the opportunity to apply and

   evaluate the ideas.

 

The books.

>Allan G. Johnson’s book, The Blackwell Dictionary of Sociology,2nd edition.  This was published by     Blackwell Publishers in Malden, Massachusetts in 2000.

>Berch Berberoglu’s text, An Introduction to Classical and Contemporary Social Theory:  A

  Critical  Perspective, 2nd edition, published in 1998 by General Hall, Inc., in Dix Hills, New

   York.

 

Earning the Grade.

>Each week you may earn as many as 50 points as follows:

            30 @ 5 = 150 points for written work, brought to class, demonstrating reflection and

comprehension,

            5 @ 25 = 125 points for informed and thoughtful participation in discussion, and

            30 @ 6 = 150points for demonstrating mastery on short written quizzes.

>One of six quizzes will be excluded from consideration.  This may be a missed quiz or the

  worst among six if all six are taken.  One of six papers will be similarly dropped, missed or

  worst paper.

>Two class meetings may be missed for whatever reason without loss of points.

>On the final exam, which is comprehensive, a total of 75 points may be earned.

>The grading system is:

            A is 90-100%,  B 80-89, C  70-79,  D  60-70, and F is below 60%

 

Cautionary notes.

>Being in class and being prepared are necessary. There is no makeup for participation. 

Written work handed in late will receive reduced credit.

>Cheating, in the form of copying another’s work or plagiarism, will result in failing the course

  and may further result in a recommendation of dismissal from the University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So304 Fall 2004

Development of Sociological Theory

Tentative syllabus

Instructor: Dr. G. F. Dobbertin

Office: Library 326

Office Hours: MWF @ 12pm

                            MW @  2pm

 

Text: Readings will be handed out in class.

 

Course objectives:

The student will be introduced to those social philosophers who created the intellectual foundation of Sociology. This introduction shall be composed of three elements: 1) the philosopher’s ideas and work, 2) the social conditions which generated their ideas and work, 3) salient biographical details about the philosophers themselves. It is expected that the student will become familiar with all the theorists discussed in class and in the readings. The student will also select one theorist and write a paper on him.

 

Cultural change under industrialization and urbanization, and its influence upon economic, political, family, social welfare and other social institutions influenced sociological thought, as did the changes in social stratification, social mobility, and population growth; and in development of social movements.

 

We must learn from the scribblers of the past. John Maynard Keynes was correct when he said “ Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct” social philosopher.

 

Exams:

There shall be two essay exams covering the material in the lectures and readings, one is the Midterm and one is the final; both are “open book” and “open note”. The date for the midterm will be October 22nd, Friday; the final is December 15, Wednesday, at 12:30 pm.

The final exam is not comprehensive, it covers the material in the last half of the course. However, the final exam might contain a question requiring the student to integrate ideas from the first half of the course with those from the last half.

 

Book Report: Each student will select a theorist and read at least one biography about him and at least one volume of his work. This theorist must be chosen from among those presented in the course, the selection approved by Dr. Dobbertin. The student will submit a 15 page book report about his or her subject on  Monday, November 22nd.  This report will be graded and accorded the same weight as one of the exams.

 

No later than Friday, September 24th, the student must select a theorist and receive approval from Dr. Dobbertin.

 

By the next Friday, October 1st, the student must hand in to the instructor a bibliography for the paper.

 

No later than Friday, November 5th, the student will submit a rough draft along with all notes, outlines, and other written material which they have produced for their paper up to this day.

 

The finished paper must be handed in on Nov. 22, Monday.

 

Mark all these dates on your calendar:

     Sept. 24th, Friday, select a theorist and get approval

     Oct. 1st , Friday, hand in bibliography

     Nov. 5th, Friday, rough draft and notes are due

     Nov. 22nd , Monday, finished paper is due

 

      Failure to meet any of these deadlines on time will result in a 5%

      reduction in the grade for your paper.

 

Grading Scheme:

The midterm, final exam and paper are equally weighted, together they make up 90% of your course grade. There will be short written assignments during the semester and discussion in class which will account for the last 10%.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SO401 and SO 402 Sociology Research I and II

                                                                   Dr. Dobbertin

This is the capstone course in the Sociology program and the course in which you bring together skills and knowledge gained throughout your college program.  In this course you demonstrate your intellectual abilities as a person about to become a college graduate.  You will want to give considerable energy and effort to make the your senior research paper and presentation the absolute best you can do. 

 

You will have two semesters to compete the project.  Most students start reading and writing in preparation for this major project in the spring semester of their junior year. 

 

This project is excellent preparation for reports you will probably have to write in future employment and for graduate work, if you continue your formal studies. This course will challenge your character and work habits perhaps more than to your intellectual ability. You will need organizational abilities to schedule your own work, discipline to stick to your schedule, imagination to create your own project, ability to work with others to give and receive suggestions, humility to ask for help when you need it, and, most important, courage to plunge ahead in a project without having a clear idea of the form and shape of the outcome.

 

The Sociology Research Paper

The major product of this course is a sociological research paper and presentation.  It is completed in stages, each step more clearly defining the final product.Through a library search last spring, you have transformed your general area of interest into a research proposal. During this fall semester, you will read and reflect upon sociological theory and research directly related to your hypothesis and will write the "Review of Literature" chapter summarizing these. This will be completed and presented to the class during the tenth week of fall semester.  During the remaining weeks of Fall semester you will write a draft of your plan for conducting research, using your texts on research methods and statistics, and other resources as are necessary. During spring semester, you will secure approval for your project, conduct the research and analyze the data, using inferential and/or descriptive statistics. The final report will consist of:

            1.  a title page,*

            2.  an abstract (written last),

            3.  a table of contents,

            4.  a chapter reviewing the literature, developed from notes created during your library research but written by you in your words, *

5.      the methods chapter, which is the plan for gathering data and the second part of the report to be written,*

6.      the findings and analysis, which is the chapter wherein you present your data, the                                                    

7.      inferential and description statistics with charts and/or tables, and the implications of these for your hypothesis,

8.      a conclusion, included if you wish to discuss the policy or theoretical implications of your findings,

9.      the list of references used in the report is required,* and

10.  an appendix which may be necessary to include the questionnaire or interview schedule, etc.

*These parts will be written fall semester.

 

Guidelines for the research paper include the following.

1.      The paper will be written in APA style.  A manual is available at the Library Circulation Desk.

2.      All ideas will be cited with page(s) given.  All material used must be available to me, through the library, on-line or photocopy provided by the student.  All note cards must be turned in with the paper.                                    

3.      The student will use a minimum of quotations.  Papers with excessive or unnecessary quotes will be returned for revision and will be considered late.

4.      Papers with writing errors or problems of style will be returned for revision and will be considered late.   It is assumed that the student will revise her/his writing about 3 to 5 times to produce a paper reflecting the student’s best effort.  Even very accomplished professional writers do not do their best in their first drafts.  Good writing is the product of revision.

5.      Making your written work concise is an important step in revision.  Most students” first drafts are too wordy.  Expect 4 or 5 pages in early drafts to yield 2 to 3 pages in final form.

6.      The end product will be about 25 pages of text for items 4 - 7 listed of contents above.  Use font of 12, one-inch margins all around, and double spacing.

7.      All presentations are to be given using a limited number of note cards.  You cannot read your paper for the presentation.  You will speak, not read, to the class.  Presentations are required for credit in the course.    

 

It is expected that, as a college senior, you are a competent writer and are able to use the computer as a word processor and to produce graphics.  It is expected that the report will be written using a computer and that at least one computer-generated table or chart will be included in the paper.  For assistance with writing or computer problems, use the Learning Center.

 

EARNING THE GRADE

The quality of the final paper and presentation will determine 70% of your grade in this course. Thirty percent of your grade will be based upon your performance on assignments and participation in collaborative work in class, including listening and responding to colleagues’ presentations.  Late work will lose 20% of its credit.  There is no make-up for collaborative class work.

 

Plagiarism will result in failing the course.  Failing the course means returning to repeat the course next year to remove the F grade.  Whatever requirements you may have had for other papers in other courses, in this course you will compose your paper, using and citing many ideas from your readings, but using your words, your sentence structure, and your phrases.  Do not paraphrase sources.  Typically paraphrasing produces papers with poor flow and lack of clarity.  Often paraphrasing leads to plagiarism.  To avoid plagiarism and paraphrasing, I strongly recommend that you follow these procedures in making reading notes.

     1.  Read and understand the source before you pick up pencil or pen or touch the keyboard,

     2.  close the source, then write or keyboard your notes, and

     3.  keep the source closed during the entire time you are writing your note(s).

Remember, READ, CLOSE BOOK, WRITE NOTES.

Please do not plagiarize.  The above will be applied without exception.

 

LAKE SUPERIOR STATE UNIVERSITY

TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

 

TE 444 SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS

 

SPRING 2005

 

INSTRUCTOR:  CRAIG D. FREED, PH.D.

OFFICE:  320A SOUTH HALL, TEACHER EUCATION DEPARTMENT

OFFICE PHONE:  (906) 635-2657

E-MAIL:  cfreed@lssu.edu

OFFICE HOURS:  M:  11-12; T:  3-5; W:  11-12; TH:  3-4

 

TE 444, Social Studies Methods for Secondary Teachers, is a 3-hour undergraduate class.

 

 

  1. Course Prerequisites:

 

The teacher candidate must be admitted to the teacher education program prior to taking this class.  TE 150; TE 250; TE 301

 

  1. Course Description:

 

This course will examine the “curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods, and assessment of teaching social studies to diverse secondary learners.”  Particular attention will be paid to Michigan standards in planning future social studies course content.  Technology will be incorporated into the course.  Teacher candidates should also plan to be actively involved throughout the course.  Practice teaching and planning units will comprise a large segment of the course.  Fieldwork required.

 

  1. Knowledge Base:

 

This methods course will allow students to gain experience reviewing social studies curriculum and teaching methods.  The topics examined in this course are ones that all secondary social studies teachers should have a large amount of familiarity with before beginning an internship.  There will be an emphasis in gaining the ability to teach to a wide latitude of student diversity.

 

“Teaching might appear to be a solo act: w hen the door closes, it’s usually just one teacher and her students”  (Christensen, 2000, p. viii).  Today there are a lot of  people looking over the teacher’s shoulder and demanding accountability from the instructor.  State and national standards are being used to insure specific content elements are being taught to all pupils and tests are in place to measure the teacher’s ability to express those elements to all students.  Never before have teachers been so much under the microscope as they deal with an increasingly diverse student body and communities increasingly unsure of the teachers’ ability to adequately teach today’s students.  All teacher candidates must be aware of the state standards developed for social studies within the state they intend to teach.

 

Along with an increase emphasis on state standards has been more accountability for minimal abilities in math, reading and writing.  The language arts teacher and the math teacher are not the only ones being held accountable for students’ abilities to read, write or do basic math.  ALL teachers must insure that these basic skills are addressed within their classrooms.  Rather than look upon the requirement of a literate student as simply meeting the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act, these basic components of learning will be placed in a new light:  empowering students “to examine society and try to change it and to fight it” (Christensen, 2000, p.  viii).  This ability is especially critical for social studies teachers.

 

  1. Curricular Relationship:

 

This course is required by the Lake Superior State University for the secondary social studies licensure program.  It must be successfully completed (grade of B- or higher) before entering the internship.

 

  1. Course Objectives:

 

Teacher candidates who successfully complete the course will be able to:

 

  • Demonstrate cooperative learning techniques
  • Adapt social studies instruction to individual needs
  • Evaluate and assess student learning
  • Use technology to enhance social studies instruction
  • Understand the politics of language
  • Unlearn the myths in social studies
  • Teach in diverse classrooms
  • Foster citizenship competency
  • Promote reflective inquiry
  • Engage students in active learning techniques
  • Organize and plan lessons and units of social studies
  • Incorporate state standards into units of study

 

  1. Course Performance  Assessments:

 

  1. Teaching Units and Lessons.

 

Each teacher candidate will be expected to create a unit of study under the state standards of Michigan and to present to the instructor outlines of lessons.  These lessons to be presented to the class will include the following themes:

 

1)       Service-learning

2)       Group investigation technique

3)       Role playing/simulations

4)       Teaching facts and generalizations

5)       Citizenship promotion unit

6)       Persuasive essay

7)       Integrating social studies on the internet

 

  1. Log and Reaction Paper from the Fieldwork

 

Each teacher candidate should keep a log of all hours in the internship and then compose a 5-page reaction paper to the experience.