Lake Superior State University

School of Environmental and Physical Sciences

Department of Chemistry

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

CH 116, Spring 2006 (Tues & Thur 9:30-11)

 

Dr. David Myton  Chemistry Office: CRW 311 Phone: 2341

School of Education Office: STH Phone x2349 email dmyton@LSSU.edu

Office Hours: Mon 9-noon, Tues 1-3 pm

 

Course Description: CH 116 General Chemistry II (4 semester credits)

General Chemistry is the second semester of the university level course for students pursuing further study in science.  This course continues to emphasize the integration of concepts and applications with factual information and to stress approaches to both conceptual and numerical problem solving in both lecture and laboratory.  Throughout the course, chemistry will be used to understand everyday phenomena, to evaluate the risks and benefits environmental issues, and be related to other disciplines.

 

Prerequisite:

CH115 General Chemistry I with a grade of C or better.   (This course with its associated laboratory has been approved to meet the General Education science requirements.)

Access to the course websites, with review material, found at http://webcta.lssu.edu  and at http://education.lssu.edu/myton and http://edugen.wiley.com/edugen/index.uni

 

Textbooks:    

Lecture: CHEMISTRY, Matter and its Changes, 4th Ed Brady & Senese, Wiley Publishing

Lab: General Chemistry Laboratory Beran – (continuing the same book as in CH115)

 

Other Required Materials:

 

State Council of State Science Supervisors:

http://www.csss-science.org/safety.shtml

http://www.csss-science.org/downloads/scisafe.pdf

 

Ø      Homework:  eGrade Plus – packaged with textbook, available online

Ø      H-ITT Clicker for classroom response system – check-out from library

Ø      Chemical Splash Goggles, must be indirectly vented with plugs INSTALLED

Ø      A NON-PROGRAMMABLE SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR is required for exams

 

Optional:  [Just for the record, the following items are NOT optional: Reading the chapter, studying the example exercises, and working through the chapter problems, handouts, homework, and availing yourself of the assistance and support of the instructor.]  What is optional is if you want a laboratory apron and gloves, Student Study Guide, Student Solution Manual or a new titanium mechanical pencil.

 

Topics Covered:  (Expanded course objectives are available in a separate document for each chapter)

Ø      Brady & Senese: Ch 14: Solutions
Learning Objective:  Be able to calculate solution concentrations in units of molarity, molality and weight percent, calculate changes in colligative properties, and use enthalpy and LeChatelier's principle to explain the behavior of solutions and gases.

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 15: Kinetics
Learning Objective:  Be able to use experimental data to calculate and manipulate rate expressions for chemical reactions including changes in concentration and time.  Use collision and kinetic theories to explain chemical kinetics.

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 16: Chemical Equilibria: General Concepts
Learning Objective: Be able to use the equilibrium constant expression to analyze chemical systems and calculate the concentrations involving products and reactants, including the application of LeChatelier's principle in equilibrium systems.

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 17: Acids and Bases: A Second Look
 Learning Objective:  Be able to calculate the concentrations and pH of solutions of weak acids and bases using equilibrium constant expressions, and identify acids/bases and their conjugates.

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 18: Equilibria in Solutions of Weak Acids and Bases
Learning Objective:  Be able to solve for the pH of a buffered system as well as the concentrations of chemical species at any point in an acid/base titration

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 19: Solubility and Simultaneous Equilibria
Learning Objective:  Be able to use the solubility product constant expression to calculate the concentration of species at equilibrium, identify separation procedures using solubility, and solve common-ion problems.

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 20: Thermodynamics - Entropy, Free Energy & Equilibrium
Learning Objective:  Be able to calculate thermodynamic values from chemical systems including H, S and G, using them to predict the direction of chemical change.

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 21: Electrochemistry
Learning Objective:  Be able to identify chemical oxidation and reduction, balance redox reactions and calculate cell potentials for standard and nonstandard conditions, and relate Gibbs Free Energy to cell potentials and equilibrium constants

Ø      Brady & Senese Ch 22: Nuclear Reactions
Learning Objective:  Be able to write and balance equations for nuclear reactions, calculate half-lives for nuclear decay reactions

 

Other:

            Class/Laboratory Schedule: Class meets for 1.5 hr twice a week plus a 2-hour final during finals week, Lab meets two hours and fifty minutes each week through a 14 week semester.  During the summer session the lecture meets M-R for 2 hr per day, with labs twice a week.  The summer course content is accelerated, but total class and laboratory time (instructional hours) remains the same.

            This course serves as prerequisite to the following courses:  CH220 Survey of Organic Chemistry, CH225 Organic Chemistry I, CH231 Quantitative Analysis, CH361 Physical Chemistry I, BL204 Microbiology, BL220 Genetics, BL315 Plant Physiology, BL330 Animal Physiology, BL345 Limnology  

            Course Coordinators: Myton

 

 

Grading:  Course grades will be derived from Assessments (not less than 80%), Homework and Lab (up to 10% each).  Assessments include imbedded activities such as “clicker assignment” conducted in class, the writing assignment, and the intermediate tests and final exam.  The laboratory work is a mandatory component for the course, a passing grade in the lab must be achieved to receive a passing grade in the course.  Grading is progressive with later tests whose content is cumulative for the entire course, weighted more than earlier tests.  Attendance at all class sessions is strongly advised, graded quizzes and in-class “Clicker” assignments will be collected regularly for grading and attendance.  Scantron forms and #2 pencil are required for each major test/exam. Missed exams cannot be retaken except in emergency or extenuating circumstances, schedule an early exam if an approved absence is unavoidable.  The final cumulative exam is required.  No grades are dropped or replaced, no extra credit is available.  Full credit is available only to work completed by the assigned completion date, late work may be discounted or rejected.  Course grades are broadly based on a 90% = A-, 80%= B-, 70% = C- scale referenced to an assigned maximum value.

 

Spring 2006 Schedule

Week of

Tues

Thur

Week of

Tues

Thur

1 Jan 9

Ch 14

Ch 14

8 Mar 6

Ch 18

Ch 18

2 Jan 16

Ch 14

Ch 15

9 Mar 13

Ch 18

Ch 19

3 Jan 23

Ch 15

Ch 15

10 Mar 20

Ch 19

Ch 19

4 Jan 30

Ch 16

Exam 1

11 Mar 27

Ch 20

Exam 3

5 Feb 6

Ch 16

Ch 16

12 Apr 3

Ch 20

Ch 21

6 Feb 13

Ch 17

Ch 17

13 Apr 10

Ch 21

Ch 21

7 Feb 20

Ch 17

Exam 2

14 Apr 24

Ch 22

Ch 22

Final Exam: ACS 2nd Semester

 

Summer 2006 Schedule

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Week 1

May 9-12

Ch 14

Ch 14

Ch 14

Ch 14

Ch 15

Ch 15

Ch 15

Ch 15

Week 2

May 16-19

Ch 16

Ch 16

Review

Test 1: Ch 1-15

Ch 16

Ch 16

Ch 17

Ch 17

Week 3

May 23-26

Ch 17

Ch 17

Review

Test 2: Ch 1-17

Ch 18

Ch 18

Ch 18

Ch 18

Week 4

May 30-June 2

Memorial

Day (U.S.)

Review

Test 3: Ch 1-18

Ch 19

Ch 19

Ch 19

Ch 19

Week 5

June 6-9

Ch 20

Ch 20

Review

Test 3: Ch 1-19

Ch 20

Ch 20

Ch 21

Ch 21

Week 6

June 13-16

Ch 21

Ch 21

Ch 22

Ch 22

Ch 22

Review

Final Exam

ACS 2nd Sem

 

 

Exams: Exam dates are set to provide regular and systematic assessment – exam content will be limited to that content prior to the class session prior to the exam.  Each student is advised to bring a personal calculation aid with them to every class, laboratory and test/examination (abacus, slide rule or calculator) - these cannot be shared during tests and should be capable of manipulating scientific notation, logarithms and exponents.  Only NON-PROGRAMMABLE SCIENTIFIC CALCULATORS may be used during tests, quizzes and examinations.  My philosophy regarding the memorization of formula and physical constants is that each student can and will learn those that they find useful and valuable on an ongoing basis.  Therefore I, for this semester only, (don’t count on anyone else doing this) will allow the use during quizzes, tests and exams the use, in addition to your personal calculator, pencil, and blank scratch paper, the use of one and only one 3”x5” conventional index card.  No card may be used on the course final – you must work toward full independence by the end of the course.  This one card may contain any physical constants, formulas, sample calculations, prayers and/or meditative verse that you believe you may find useful.  All information on the card must be handwritten.  I will provide unusual or unique physical constants for specific chemicals, bond energies, activities of metals, and standard molar enthalpies, etc.  Each student may possess one and only one card as described above, violations of this rule are considered academic dishonesty - severe penalties will be enforced.   It is vital that you report promptly for exams, as no time extensions are possible. 

 

Homework:  Success in General Chemistry is undeniably linked to the amount of time invested in learning the material and problem solving.  In order to facilitate your mastery of chemical problem solving this course will use the eGrade EduGen Homework – continued from the first semester, for the assignment of graded homework.  Additional review material and practice exam are available from the WebCT site.

 

Writing Assignment: Go to the library and browse the stacks of paper chemistry periodicals.  Start with a journal like the Journal of Chemical Education (JCE).  In JCE you will find easy reading in the front, and research papers in the back.  In a journal like “Analytical Chemistry” you will find some “review” articles in the front and research articles in the back.  Your assignment is to photocopy a research or review article of your choice and write a review of the paper.  Summarize what they did (or the development of some field of chemical knowledge), specifically how they made their measurements/synthesis/experimentation, and what it all means or how it relates to general chemistry topics.   You will turn in the copy of the original article and your review together on April 4, 2006.  The journal must have chemistry in the title, the article selected must be either review or research, not a demonstration, news item or otherwise ‘easy reading.  If in doubt- ask!

Your review will be graded based on both content and format, spelling and grammar “count”.   The paper will be counted in the final grade at a weight somewhat equivalent to a tests.  You may include the words written by others directly only when presented in quotation marks and properly cited.  You may include the facts and ideas of others in any format only when you properly cite the source.  You may include your own original work without restriction (For example: this assignment was based on an article written by Dr. David Newman at Bowling Green State University (http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/english/rcweb/chem.htm))

The Fine Print:

The LSSU Catalog/Calendar contains a more complete description of your rights and responsibilities as a member of the University community. In the Catalog/Calendar you will find a complete statement of our institutional purpose, definitions of university terminology, our Equal Opportunity policy, and especially the ACADEMIC POLICIES.  Attendance: I expect you to attend and participate in class as a valuable and contributing member in the community of learners of which the course is comprised.  Not every contingency leading to an excusable absence can be anticipated, and an occasional absence may reasonably be anticipated which requires special consideration.  However, extended absences, even for valid reasons, preclude the student’s full and active participation in the course, in meeting the full objectives of the course and may lead to a non-passing or incomplete grade – even when other work is completed satisfactorily. NOTICE:  A failing grade (F) can be assigned to students who commit acts of academic dishonesty. At the instructor’s discretion this grade may be for the assignment or the entire course depending on the nature and severity of the offense.  Academic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating (the intentional use or attempted use of unauthorized materials, information or study aids in any academic exercise) , fabricating (intentional or unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise), facilitating academic dishonesty (Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another violate any provisions of this code), or plagiarism (intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise).  Definitions from the Code of Academic Integrity, University of Maryland at College Park.  This syllabus is not intended to be a comprehensive statement, please be aware that other academic policies and procedures are outlined in the catalog and they apply to you as well. The course syllabus represents the best estimate and projection of course content, scope and sequence. In the case of extenuating circumstances, changes in enrollment, flood, fire or tornado, other Acts of God, by mutual consent, or at the discretion of the instructor, the course and lab syllabi are subject to change.  Americans with Disabilities Act: In compliance with Lake Superior State University policy and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available.  Students who desire such services are to meet with the professor in a timely manner, preferably the first week of class, to discuss their disability-related needs.  Students will not receive services until they register with the Resource Center for Students with Disabilities (RCSD).  Proper registration will enable the RCSD to verify the disability and determine reasonable academic accommodations.  RCSD is located in the Library, extension 2454.

 


Laboratory:  Chemistry is an experimental science.  You are encouraged to think independently about the data you collect and you will not be graded solely on whether you acquire the right number or deduce the correct explanation, but rather whether your explanations and hypotheses follow logically from the data and that your reasoning is clearly stated.  In the laboratory component of this course students may OCCASIONALLY work together in teams of no more than two, as directed by the instructor.  Each student team member is responsible for assuming an equal share of the lab responsibilities and work load.  Students are to prepare the pre-laboratory assignments before coming to lab, and to complete and turn in their own laboratory reports as assigned.  Students are advised to read the laboratory procedures and carefully plan their work to maximize efficiency and guarantee success.  If you must be absent from a laboratory session you should contact your laboratory instructor and attend one of the other sessions that has available space within the next week.  Missed labs cannot be made up after the end of the week following the scheduled lab.


 

Section                        Day/Time                    Instructor                    Section

00A   NG   12  M      0200-0450PM       Myton D           20   8     N  LAB      10098

00B   NG    4  T      0600-0900PM         Dunham L         20  16     N  LAB      10099

00C   NG    1  W      0200-0450PM        Blanchard R     20  19     N  LAB      10100

00D   NG    2  R      0200-0450PM         Staff P              20  18     N  LAB      10101

 

Text: General Chemistry Laboratory 7th Ed. Beran

Laboratory Schedule: (listed by anticipated order of completion – see schedule)

Week  Activity

1.       No lab week 1

2.       Exp. 20 Molar mass of a solid

3.       Exp. 22 Factors affecting reaction rates

4.       Exp. 23 Determination of a rate law

5.       Exp. 25 An equilibrium constant

6.       Exp. 26 Antacid Analysis

7.       Exp. 13 Acids, bases and salts; pH

8.       Exp.  9 A volumetric analysis

9.       Exp. 29 Molar solubility – Common Ion Effect

10.   Exp. 31 Thermodynamics of Borax solubility

11.   Exp. 32 Galvanic Cells

12.   Exp. 27 Potentiometric Analysis

13.   Exp. 30 Hard Water Analysis

14.   Laboratory Final

 

Safety in the Laboratory

While working in the laboratory you are expected to comply with the safety rules which follow, any and all rules posted in the laboratory or as established by your instructor.  Violations of the safety rules endanger both you and others in the laboratory.  Students who violate the established rules and procedures may be subject to warnings, reductions in grade, or expulsion from the lab.  Safety rule violations include but are not limited to the following. (Consult your laboratory instructor for specific directions regarding the laboratory activities each week and for specific information regarding the hazards and precautions required in each laboratory session.)

1.         What is not explicitly allowed in the lab – it is FORBIDDEN! Always ask your instructor prior to engage to any not described in your lab book activity.

2.         Not wearing appropriate safety goggles for the activities assigned.  NOTE: some activities such as pouring and mixing concentrated reagents require the use of SPECIAL chemical splash goggles and perhaps other personal protective equipment.  Consult your instructor and always use the highest level of protection available and appropriate for the task assigned.

3.         Smoking, eating, or drinking in the laboratory.

4.         Pipetting by mouth or otherwise handling chemicals unsafely. Using an open flame to heat flammable liquids.

5.         Not working under a fume hood when directed to do so.

6.         Failing to report or clean up chemical spills or broken equipment.  Special spill kits are available in the lab to handle a variety of spilled chemicals.

7.         Disposing of chemicals improperly.  ALWAYS consult the instructor for the proper handling instructions or location of the designated "USED CHEMICALS" container for the experiment.

8.         Working alone in the laboratory or working outside the regularly scheduled lab times without permission. 

9.         Performing unauthorized experiments.

10.     Engaging in horseplay or other behavior that jeopardizes your safety or that of others in the laboratory.

11.     Failure to comply or adhere to guidelines and directives given by authorized university personnel

 

Periodic Table source: http://dph1701.tripod.com/chemistry/smallelements.htm