Revisions for August 2006 resubmission.  Standards addressed:

 


Standards for the Preparation of Teachers

  

 

DI
Integrated Science

(Elementary)

  


 Adopted by the Michigan State Board of Education

August 8,2002

 


 

 

Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of Integrated Science (Elementary)

DI Endorsement

 

Preface

 

 

Development of the Proposal

 

Over the last several years, a referent group of professional educators developed a proposal to adopt standards for the preparation of integrated science teachers.  These standards align with standards developed by the National Science Teachers Association and the Michigan Curriculum Framework for science education. 

 

An elementary integrated science endorsement prepares candidates to teach integrated science in grades K-5, and also to teach biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science in grades 6-8, in courses designed to meet the Michigan Curriculum Framework science standards.  The preparation of integrated science teachers includes courses of study in each of the three major categories of science identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework:  Life Sciences, Physical Science, and Earth/Space Science.  The Elementary Integrated Science Endorsement requires either a group major with a minimum of 36 semester hours distributed among the three major categories for a balance of credits across the areas, or a group minor with a minimum of 24 semester hours among the three major categories.  Candidates who apply for the DI endorsement (elementary) must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification integrated science test at the elementary level for their elementary certificate.

 

To provide information and gather feedback on the proposal, a copy was also forwarded to selected groups/organizations, all Michigan teacher preparation institutions, and a random sample of intermediate and local school districts for review and comment.  As presented in this document, the standards reflect the feedback received. 

 

State Board adoption of these standards typically leads to the creation of a new certification test for teachers prepared to teach elementary integrated science.  Test development for a new Michigan Test for Teacher Certification in elementary integrated science will be scheduled according to the recommendation of the Standing Technical Advisory Council. 

 

 

Approval of Programs

 

Teacher preparation institutions that wish to continue to offer programs to prepare elementary integrated science teachers are required to submit an application for program approval that demonstrates how the new standards are met throughout the proposed curriculum.  The programs must be re-approved to show compliance with the new standards.  Following initial approval, the teacher preparation program will be reviewed every five years through the Periodic Review/Program Evaluation process.

 


 

Content Guidelines/Standards Matrix

College/University

Lake Superior State UniversitySault Sainte Marie

Code

DI

 

Source of Guidelines/Standards

Michigan State Board of Education,
August 2002

Program/Subject Area

Integrated Science (Elementary)

 

A – Awareness

The integrated science teacher recognizes/recalls the existence of different aspects of integrated science and related teaching strategies.

 

B – Basic Understanding

The integrated science teacher articulates knowledge about integrated science and related instructional and assessment strategies.  The integrated science teacher demonstrates proficiency in using the knowledge at a fundamental level of competence acceptable for teaching.

 

C – Comprehensive Understanding

The integrated science teacher is able to apply broad, in-depth knowledge of the different aspects of integrated science in a variety of settings.  (This level is not intended to reflect mastery; all teachers are expected to be lifelong learners.)

 

An integrated science endorsement prepares a teacher to teach integrated science at the elementary level in courses designed to meet the Michigan Curriculum Framework science standards.  The preparation of integrated science teachers includes courses of study in each of the three major categories of science identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework:  Life Sciences, Physical Science, and Earth/Space Science.  The Elementary Integrated Science Endorsement requires a group major with a minimum of 36 semester hours distributed among the three major categories for a balance of credits across the areas or a group minor with a minimum of 24 semester hours among the three major categories.  Candidates who apply for the DI Endorsement (elementary) must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification integrated science test at the elementary level for their elementary certificate. 

 

DIRECTIONS:    List required courses on matrix and provide additional narrative to explain how standards are met.  If electives are included, they should be clearly indicated.  Adjust size of cells as needed. 


 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences
Fulfill the Standards for Elementary Programs

 

Standard/Guideline

Group Minor

Group Major

 

Submit a narrative that explains how this program:

 

 

A.

uses the Michigan Curriculum Framework K-12 Science Content Standards and Benchmarks as the critical foundation for teacher preparation, ensuring that elementary integrated science teachers have the content knowledge and the ability to teach this curriculum; and

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

B.

develops an understanding of the interconnectedness of all science, along with major unifying themes, and relates this understanding to the teaching of science; and

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

C.

Prepares candidates to understand and teach biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science as integrated content.

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

 


 

 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences
Fulfill the Standards for Elementary Programs

No.

Standard/Guideline

Level of Proficiency

Group Minor

Group Major

 

The preparation of elementary integrated science teachers will enable them to:

 

 

1.0

understand and develop the major concepts and principles of biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics, which may include such topics as the following:

 

 

1.1

Cellular Function, including

 

 

 

1.1.1

cell theory

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I is a detailed examination of cell theory, investigating how cells function and how are able to replicate themselves.

1.1.2

cell types

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131 General Biology I examines prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types and looks at the similarities and differences.

1.1.3

cell structure and function

C

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I explores the function of the various organelles of eukaryotic cells and contrasts this with prokaryotic cells.

1.1.4

protein synthesis

A

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I pursues protein synthesis in the context of gene expression as well as with respect to the endomembrane system.

1.1.5

cell division (mitosis & meiosis)

A

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I examines the cell cycle with respect to a cell’s ability to make copies of itself, what can go wrong, and how an organism makes gametes for sexual reproduction.

1.2

Organization of Living Things, including

 

 Field Biology provides candidates experiences in Natural History, the plant and animal kingdoms, and conservation.  Designed for the elementary candidate this course includes hands-on field experiences in the laboratory targeted to the kinds of information and experiences needed by elementary teachers.

 

1.2.1

life cycles (including sexual and asexual reproduction)

C

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.2.2

living and non-living

C

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.2.3

Systems

C

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.2.4

classification

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology  The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.2.5

growth and development (embryology, etc.)

A

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I approaches growth and development while understanding gene expression. We examine cell cycle and the effects on growth and then investigate how gene expression affects cell differentiation during development.

1.2.6

photosynthesis

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I examines photosynthesis in the context of energy storage. In lab we also spend several weeks growing plants under a variety of conditions to investigate variation in rates of photosynthesis.

1.2.7

cellular respiration

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I examines cellular respiration from  several angles. In lecture we cover the chemistry of ATP formation, then in lab we have several weeks of experiments looking at aerobic and anaerobic respiration as well as decomposition and human respiration

1.3

Concepts of Heredity, including

 

 In BL131 candidates learn about gene function, transcription and translation, and genetic engineering, among other topics.

 

1.3.1

Mendelian genetics

B

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.2

traits passed from one generation to the next

C

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.3

molecular genetics (structure of DNA)

A

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.4

modern genetics (electrophoresis, genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting, etc.)

A

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.5

environmental effects on heredity

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.4

Evolutionary Change, including

 

 The theory of evolution and evolutionary change is fundamental to environmental science and biology and is a recurring theme in NS103/104. The change in a species gene pool over time by differential reproduction provides an explanation of why diversity exists and how loss of diversity, i.e. extinction, reduces the potential for future evolutionary change.  The concepts of pest resistance and genetically modified organisms are linked to this topic in NS103/104.

 

1.4.1

diversity/speciation

A

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.4.2

theory of evolution (adaptation, variation, and natural selection and relationships between species, including human)

B

BL107 Field Biology - (Revised Aug06) BL107

(Revised Aug06)

The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

Evolution is an integrative concept in BIOL107, discussed throughout the term but not as a separate unit. For example, discussions of niches incorporates discussion of the evolutionary costs and benefits of niche occupation as well as niche differentiation and limiting similarity. Discussion of phyla includes discussion of adaptive radiation of root phyla. Homologous structures within major body plans are discussed as well as monophyletic nature of orders. Independent evolution of particular traits and convergent evolution, and coevolutionary relationships are discussed as part of the ecological discussions.  For students taking BL131 and BL132, evolution is likewise threaded throughout the entire discussion. 

1.4.3

fossils/ancient life

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology
Again, in BL107, there is discussion of the evidence for evolution, and we certainly discuss the role of fossils. In discussing evolutionary development, we discuss ancient life. the geological time frame of these developments would be described.

1.4.4

Extinction

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology
The risk of extinction is discussed in BL107 when describing conservation concerns. we do not have a 'unit' on extinction but it is woven into the discussion of conservation concerns of the various taxa we discuss. local examples include modern extinctions such as passenger pigeon, endangered species such as piping plover, prehistoric extinctions such as post-pleistocene megafauna. again, these are woven through the discussion, not treated separately.

1.5

Ecological Systems, including

 

The structure of ecosystems, how ecosystems transfer mass and energy and how ecosystems are linked to the major biogeochemical cycles, population dynamics, and succession constitute the first 25% of NS103/104.  The unifying concepts stressed throughout these courses are the conservation of mass and the first and second laws of thermodynamics.  Current environmental issues are used to provide a context for these concepts and natural ecosystems are used as models to explore the concept of sustainability for the human built environment.

1.5.1

community relationships, including predator/prey and symbiosis

C

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.5.2

Population

A

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.5.3

transfer of energy (food chains/webs)

C

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.5.4

biogeochemical cycles

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.5.5

human impact

B

  NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.6

Human Biology, including

 

 NS103/104 explores the relationship between environmental health and human health and populations.  Most environmental stresses are linked to human population growth and lack of sustainable management practices.  For example, in discussing indoor and outdoor air pollution, smoking risk and its adverse human health impacts is placed in context with air pollution such as photochemical smog and fine particulate matter.  

1.6.1

anatomy and physiology

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.6.2

disease and immunology

A

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

NS103 provides the candidate an broad exposure to issues and concerns of the environment.  Candidates discuss in class, and through assignments and laboratory activities, a wide range of subjects.  In Chapter 16 of Environmental Science: Toward a Sustainable Future 8th Ed. by Wright and Nebel, the students examine issues of environmental hazards facing humans, and the topics of human health and disease.  We have expanded the course objectives found in the expanded NS103 Syllabus, and copied the Ch. 16 objectives below, to assist the reviewers in identifying the content from the course addressing Standards 1.6.2 and 1.6.3.

Ch 16: Environmental Hazards and Human Health: Key issues and topics:

  1. Life expectancy is rising worldwide, yet ten million deaths occur yearly in children under the age of five in the developing world. What are the major causes of death in developing and developed countries?
  2. Exposure to hazards in the human environment brings about the risk of injury, disease, and death. What kinds of cultural factors, infectious diseases, physical factors, and toxic chemicals are most important in this regard?
  3. Hazards take many pathways in mediating environmental risks to humans. In what ways do the following bring harm: poverty, smoking, malarial disease, and indoor air?
  4. Risk analysis is a scientific tool that the EPA is applying to its regulatory work. How is risk analysis practiced by scientists and employed in policy development?
  5. The public often perceives risks differently from the experts. What is the significance of risk perception in policy development?
 

1.6.3

health habits

B

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

The standard 1.6.3 is related to 1.6.2, and discussed in the narrative immediately preceeding.  The content of this standard is addressed in chapter 16 of the text.

1.6.4

resource management

C

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.6.5

human population growth and diversity

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

1.7

Earth/Space Science, including

The major concepts of Earth/space science are taught through a slate of courses addressing general physical and integrated historical geology course, the hydrosphere and space science. Each course has an associated required laboratory (2 hours per week).  GE121  is the foundation for the program, serving as prerequisite for all courses above the 100 level, where Intro to Geology is a survey course covering similar content.  The hydrosphere is addressed in both oceanography and meteorology/climatology, albeit from slightly different perspectives.  NS119 addresses the essential issues of space science. Laboratory exercises provide opportunity for both confirmation and demonstration of concepts taught in lecture, as well as a vehicle for students to construct new knowledge and understandings.  Course syllabi and expanded course objectives identify the key concepts, laboratory activities and assessment elements.

1.7.1

lithosphere and historical geology

B

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

or  NS102

 

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

or  NS102

 

1.7.2

Hydrosphere

C

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

1.7.3

atmosphere, weather, climate

C

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

1.7.4

Astronomy

B

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

 

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

 

NS 119 Astronomy

The department recognizes that the astronomy content of NS102 (as originally presented) did not provide sufficient depth or coverage of the required content to meet the standard.  We will modify our program application to require students to complete GE121 for the minor and endorsement programs, which was accepted as meeting the astronomy requirement.  Elementary integrated science majors will continue to be required to take NS119 Astronomy.   We have modified the program narrative and Form XX to reflect this change in requirements.

1.8

Chemistry and Physics:

Major Concepts and Principles of Physics and Chemistry

 

 

 

We recognize that the syllabus provided did not identify the core concepts with sufficient detail.  To this end we have provided more complete course objectives as described in the expanded NS110 SyllabusIn the revised Standards Matrix we have aligned the individual standards 1.8.1 through 1.8.9 with the sections in the textbook and course to which they apply.  The American Chemical Society publication Chemistry in Context,which we use in this course, uses a very effective instructional model where students are introduced to relevant environmental issues for which the underlying chemical concepts are then developed on an as-needed basis.  Chemical concepts are still developed along traditional lines (atoms to molecules to reactions), but under the guise and conceptual mapping of the environmental/health related topical themes.

1.8.1

Inorganic Chemistry, including

 

 Following the guidelines of the successful ACS Chemistry in Context series, NS110 teaches the concepts and methodology of chemistry within the context of real world issues such as water quality, air quality, food, etc.

 

1.8.1.1

atomic/molecular structure and bonding

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Candidates learn to predict atomic structure and shape, draw Lewis structures, and apply these concepts to topics in atomospheric chemistry.

 

Chapter 2-Protecting the Ozone Layer

            a).  Learn the nature of ozone and where it is located

            b).  Learn about atomic structure and periodicity

            c).  Learn how to draw electron dot diagrams for molecules

            d).  Learn the nature of electromagnetic radiation

            e).  Learn about the oxygen/ozone screen in the stratosphere

            f).  Learn about the biological effects of ultraviolet radiation

            g).  Learn about how stratospheric ozone is destroyed

            h).  Learn about the nature of chlorofluorocarbons

            i).  Learn about how the Antarctic ozone hole is created

            j).  Learn about how the issue of stratospheric ozone destruction is being addressed

 

1.8.1.2

stoichiometry

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

The quantitative elements of mass and mole are applied in NS110 in chapter 3 where students make calculations of chemical stoichiometry in the context of greenhouse gases, combustion of fossil fuels, and basic atmospheric gases.

 

Chapter 3-The Chemistry of Global Warming

            a).  Learn about the earth’s energy balance

            b).  Learn about the shape of molecules, how molecules vibrate and why that is important in terms of

                  absorbing infrared radiation

            c).  Learn the scientific history of the Greenhouse Effect including contributions by Jean Bapiste Fourier,

                  Svante Arrhenius, John Tyndell and George Callender

            d).  Learn about the carbon cycle including contributions from nature and humans

            e).  Learn the quantitative concepts of atomic/molecular mass and moles

            f).  Learn about the characteristics of Greenhouse gases

            g).  Learn about the scientific evidence of global warming and the arguments made by dissenters

            h).  Learn about the basics of the Kyoto Protocol and why the U.S. and several other nations won’t sign it

 

1.8.1.3

gas laws

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Gas laws are introduced to students in the context of the greenhouse gases.  Expanded discussion on the relationship between the kinetic molecular theory and the laws of Boyle, Charles, Avagadro, and the combined gas law is addressed in this chapter.

Chapter 3-The Chemistry of Global Warming

            a).  Learn about the earth’s energy balance

            b).  Learn about the shape of molecules, how molecules vibrate and why that is important in terms of

                  absorbing infrared radiation

            c).  Learn the scientific history of the Greenhouse Effect including contributions by Jean Bapiste Fourier,

                  Svante Arrhenius, John Tyndell and George Callender

            d).  Learn about the carbon cycle including contributions from nature and humans

            e).  Learn the quantitative concepts of atomic/molecular mass and moles

            f).  Learn about the characteristics of Greenhouse gases

            g).  Learn about the scientific evidence of global warming and the arguments made by dissenters

            h).  Learn about the basics of the Kyoto Protocol and why the U.S. and several other nations won’t sign it

1.8.1.4

states of matter

C

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

States of Matter are implicit in the introduction to all matter, discussion of atoms compounds and mixtures, and the discussion of gases in chapter 1.

Chapter 1-The Air We Breathe

            a).  Learn the chemical symbols of common elements

            b).  Learn the distinguishing characteristics of atoms and molecules

            c).  Learn the differences between elements, compounds and mixtures

d).  Learn the nature of earth’s atmosphere

e).  Learn how to name inorganic compounds and determine chemical formulas

f).  Learn the characteristics of oxygen that make it such as important atmospheric molecule

g).  Learn about common air pollutants 

           

1.8.1.5

Equilibria

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Chemical equilibrium are discussed in the context of the autoionization of water

Chapter 6-Neutralizing the Threat of Acid Rain

            a).  Learn about what acids and bases are

            b).  Learn about neutralizing reactions

            c).  Learn about pH

            d).  Learn about the sources of acid in acid precipitation

            e).  Learn about the effects of acid precipitation on humans, materials, and ecosystems

            f).  Learn about control strategies

            g).  Learn about the politics of acid rain

 

1.8.1.6

acid-bases

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Acid base chemistry, and its importance to the environment, and the impact of human activities are discussed in chapter 6.

 

Chapter 6-Neutralizing the Threat of Acid Rain

            a).  Learn about what acids and bases are

            b).  Learn about neutralizing reactions

            c).  Learn about pH

            d).  Learn about the sources of acid in acid precipitation

            e).  Learn about the effects of acid precipitation on humans, materials, and ecosystems

            f).  Learn about control strategies

            g).  Learn about the politics of acid rain

 

1.8.1.7

electrochemistry

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Basic topics of oxidation/reduction are related to the operational concepts of batteries, fuel cells, and the concepts of electrochemistry in chapter 8.

 

Chapter 8-Energy of Electron Transfer

            a).  Learn the basics of how batteries work

            b).  Learn about the common commercially available batteries

            c).  Learn how the lead-acid battery works

            d).  Learn how fuel cells work

            e).  Learn about how a fuel cell powered vehicle works and the problems associated with their wide-

                  scale use 

            f).  Learn about how water electrolysis is achieved

            g).  Learn about the hydrogen economy and the problems associated with its implementation

            h).  Learn about how photovoltaic cells work

 

1.8.1.8

nomenclature

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

CH105 Life Chemistry II and

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Students learn to name basic inorganic compounds at the beginning of NS110 (chapter 1 noted below), and the naming of organic and biochemicals in CH105 Life Chemistry II.

 

Chapter 1-The Air We Breathe

            a).  Learn the chemical symbols of common elements

            b).  Learn the distinguishing characteristics of atoms and molecules

            c).  Learn the differences between elements, compounds and mixtures

d).  Learn the nature of earth’s atmosphere

e).  Learn how to name inorganic compounds and determine chemical formulas

f).  Learn the characteristics of oxygen that make it such as important atmospheric molecule

g).  Learn about common air pollutants 

 

1.8.1.9

qualitative analysis

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

A Revised NS110 Syllabus provides expanded discussion of the course content

Laboratory experiences in NS110 provide students extensive opportunities to understand and apply the principles of analytical analysis.  Activities which are both quantitative and qualitative are included in the laboratory sequence.  Students complete laboratory reports on each activity.


Lab Schedule

Lab number and title

3 – Weighing Air and Cooling Water: A Graphic Experience

6 – Visibly Delighted; A spectrophotometric Study of Color Solutions

2 – Chromatographic Study of Felt-Tip Pen Inks

7 – Chemical Bonds, Molecular Models, and Molecular Shape

10 – Hot Stuff: An Energy Conservation Problem

11 – Comparison of the Energy Fuels

9 – Chemical Moles: Converting Baking Soda to Table Salt

13- Analysis of Vinegar and stream pH

24 -Classification and Identification of Common Plastics

26-Synthesis of Aspirin

Lab to be announced

4 – Solids in Cigarette Smoke

 

1.8.2

Physics, including

 

Candidates complete an applied course in the topics of physics addressing the key content areas of mechanics, electricity, thermodynamics and waves.  In addition, our applied environmental course provides instruction and exercises in the topics of thermodynamics.  Both courses have a strong laboratory component.

 

1.8.2.1

mechanics

B

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

1.8.2.2

electricity and magnetism

B

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

1.8.2.3

thermodynamics

A

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

and

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

and

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

 

1.8.2.4

waves, vibrations, and optics

B

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

 

 


 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences
Fulfill the Standards for Elementary Programs

No.

Standard/Guideline

Group Minor

Group Major

 

The preparation of elementary integrated science teachers will enable them to:

 

 

2.0

apply mathematics, including statistics, to investigations in the sciences, including the analysis of data;

MA207 Statistics

MA207 Statistics (or equivalent) is required for all elementary education students as a cognate of the professional education sequence.  Mathematics is applied to numerical problem solving many of the courses required in the program, and in particular in chemistry and physics.

Effective with the fall of 2005, MA207 Statistics  was a program requirement for all teacher candidates.  This requirement is reflected in our Undergraduate Handbook, and stated as a requirement for graduation.  In order to simplify this application, and to address the standard for individuals seeking to add the elementary integrated science endorsement, we will add MA207 Principles of Statistics to the program requirements (major/minor/endorsement) and reflect this change in the program narrative (2.b) and on Form XX.  This change will increase the program size by three semester credits.

3.0

relate the study of science to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues; in particular, relate the concepts of science to current controversies such as cloning, genetically-modified food, the use of energy, exploitation of resources, global changes, and medical research, as well as other issues;

 NS103/104 Intro to Environmental Science

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

It is possible to teach environmental science from an ecosystem perspective or from an anthropocentric point of view.  The human centered approach is emphasized in NS103/104 and each topic is put into the context of how it affects man and how man affects the capacity of the natural world to provide essential natural services.  Four major topics permeate the discussion in NS103/104: human population, global atmospheric change, loss of biodiversity and loss of ecosystem function. For example, current energy consumption, energy sources and problems are discussed in the context of climate change, acid precipitation, nuclear power, alternative energy sources, conservation and sustainability.

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

4.0

locate appropriate resources, design and conduct inquiry-based open-ended scientific investigations, interpret findings, communicate results, and make judgments based on evidence;

 NS103/104 Intro to Environmental Science

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

NS103/104 promotes active learning through the companion laboratory by  requiring the student to design many of their laboratory experiments from the ground up based on what they have researched  and learned in the lecture portion of the course.  Results are reported through written formal lab reports, oral reports and group discussion.

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

5.0

construct new knowledge for themselves through research, reading and discussion, and reflect in an informed way on the role of science in human affairs;

 NS103/104 Intro to Environmental Science

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

NS103/104 unlike many environmental science courses takes an anthropocentric viewpoint and focuses on learning how the natural environment can serve as a model for sustainable human environments and systems.  After understanding the connections between science, economics, and the socio-political, the students are challenged to discuss and articulate the questions and resource management issues regarding the intrinsic value of all species and ecosystems

Expanded NS103 Syllabus Aug06

 

6.0

understand and promote the maintenance of a safe science classroom as identified by the Council of State Science Supervisors, including the ethical and appropriate use and care for living organisms and scientific equipment, and the safe storage, use, and disposal of chemicals;

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

We have submitted a revised syllabus for TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06), which explicitly identifies the content standards in the areas of safety, scientific inquiry, etc.  We held discussions on both topics in the classes, and students were required to identify the safety concerns in the lessons they developed.  We have included in the departmental syllabus (linked above) those standards from the elementary DI program which are identified for this course.  Discussion of safety issues is also explicitly required in the unit plan.

7.0

demonstrate competence in the practice of teaching as defined within the Entry Level Standards for Michigan Teachers;

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

8.0

create and maintain an educational environment in which conceptual understanding will occur for all science students;

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

9.0

develop an understanding and appreciation for the nature of scientific inquiry; and

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

We have submitted a revised syllabus for TE421 Elementary Science Methods, which explicitly identifies the content standards in scientific inquiry.  We hold discussion on this topic and students develop inquiry based science lessons.  We have included in the departmental syllabus (linked above) those standards from the elementary DI program which are identified for this course.  

10.0

demonstrate competence in the practice of teaching through investigative experiences and by demonstrating the application of the scientific process and in assessing student learning through multiple processes.

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 

TE421 Elementary Science Methods (revised Aug06)