Standards for the Preparation of Teachers

  

 

DI
Integrated Science

(Elementary)

  


 Adopted by the Michigan State Board of Education

August 8,2002

 


 

 

Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of Integrated Science (Elementary)

DI Endorsement

 

Preface

 

 

Development of the Proposal

 

Over the last several years, a referent group of professional educators developed a proposal to adopt standards for the preparation of integrated science teachers.  These standards align with standards developed by the National Science Teachers Association and the Michigan Curriculum Framework for science education. 

 

An elementary integrated science endorsement prepares candidates to teach integrated science in grades K-5, and also to teach biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science in grades 6-8, in courses designed to meet the Michigan Curriculum Framework science standards.  The preparation of integrated science teachers includes courses of study in each of the three major categories of science identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework:  Life Sciences, Physical Science, and Earth/Space Science.  The Elementary Integrated Science Endorsement requires either a group major with a minimum of 36 semester hours distributed among the three major categories for a balance of credits across the areas, or a group minor with a minimum of 24 semester hours among the three major categories.  Candidates who apply for the DI endorsement (elementary) must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification integrated science test at the elementary level for their elementary certificate.

 

To provide information and gather feedback on the proposal, a copy was also forwarded to selected groups/organizations, all Michigan teacher preparation institutions, and a random sample of intermediate and local school districts for review and comment.  As presented in this document, the standards reflect the feedback received. 

 

State Board adoption of these standards typically leads to the creation of a new certification test for teachers prepared to teach elementary integrated science.  Test development for a new Michigan Test for Teacher Certification in elementary integrated science will be scheduled according to the recommendation of the Standing Technical Advisory Council. 

 

 

Approval of Programs

 

Teacher preparation institutions that wish to continue to offer programs to prepare elementary integrated science teachers are required to submit an application for program approval that demonstrates how the new standards are met throughout the proposed curriculum.  The programs must be re-approved to show compliance with the new standards.  Following initial approval, the teacher preparation program will be reviewed every five years through the Periodic Review/Program Evaluation process.

 


 

Content Guidelines/Standards Matrix

College/University

Lake Superior State UniversitySault Sainte Marie

Code

DI

 

Source of Guidelines/Standards

Michigan State Board of Education,
August 2002

Program/Subject Area

Integrated Science (Elementary)

 

A – Awareness

The integrated science teacher recognizes/recalls the existence of different aspects of integrated science and related teaching strategies.

 

B – Basic Understanding

The integrated science teacher articulates knowledge about integrated science and related instructional and assessment strategies.  The integrated science teacher demonstrates proficiency in using the knowledge at a fundamental level of competence acceptable for teaching.

 

C – Comprehensive Understanding

The integrated science teacher is able to apply broad, in-depth knowledge of the different aspects of integrated science in a variety of settings.  (This level is not intended to reflect mastery; all teachers are expected to be lifelong learners.)

 

An integrated science endorsement prepares a teacher to teach integrated science at the elementary level in courses designed to meet the Michigan Curriculum Framework science standards.  The preparation of integrated science teachers includes courses of study in each of the three major categories of science identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework:  Life Sciences, Physical Science, and Earth/Space Science.  The Elementary Integrated Science Endorsement requires a group major with a minimum of 36 semester hours distributed among the three major categories for a balance of credits across the areas or a group minor with a minimum of 24 semester hours among the three major categories.  Candidates who apply for the DI Endorsement (elementary) must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification integrated science test at the elementary level for their elementary certificate. 

 

DIRECTIONS:    List required courses on matrix and provide additional narrative to explain how standards are met.  If electives are included, they should be clearly indicated.  Adjust size of cells as needed. 


 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences
Fulfill the Standards for Elementary Programs

 

Standard/Guideline

Group Minor

Group Major

 

Submit a narrative that explains how this program:

 

 

A.

uses the Michigan Curriculum Framework K-12 Science Content Standards and Benchmarks as the critical foundation for teacher preparation, ensuring that elementary integrated science teachers have the content knowledge and the ability to teach this curriculum; and

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

B.

develops an understanding of the interconnectedness of all science, along with major unifying themes, and relates this understanding to the teaching of science; and

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

C.

Prepares candidates to understand and teach biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science as integrated content.

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

 


 

 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences
Fulfill the Standards for Elementary Programs

No.

Standard/Guideline

Level of Proficiency

Group Minor

Group Major

 

The preparation of elementary integrated science teachers will enable them to:

 

 

1.0

understand and develop the major concepts and principles of biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics, which may include such topics as the following:

 

 

1.1

Cellular Function, including

 

 

 

1.1.1

cell theory

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I is a detailed examination of cell theory, investigating how cells function and how are able to replicate themselves.

1.1.2

cell types

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131 General Biology I examines prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types and looks at the similarities and differences.

1.1.3

cell structure and function

C

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I explores the function of the various organelles of eukaryotic cells and contrasts this with prokaryotic cells.

1.1.4

protein synthesis

A

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I pursues protein synthesis in the context of gene expression as well as with respect to the endomembrane system.

1.1.5

cell division (mitosis & meiosis)

A

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I examines the cell cycle with respect to a cell’s ability to make copies of itself, what can go wrong, and how an organism makes gametes for sexual reproduction.

1.2

Organization of Living Things, including

 

 Field Biology provides candidates experiences in Natural History, the plant and animal kingdoms, and conservation.  Designed for the elementary candidate this course includes hands-on field experiences in the laboratory targeted to the kinds of information and experiences needed by elementary teachers.

 

1.2.1

life cycles (including sexual and asexual reproduction)

C

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.2.2

living and non-living

C

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.2.3

Systems

C

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.2.4

classification

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology  The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.2.5

growth and development (embryology, etc.)

A

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I approaches growth and development while understanding gene expression. We examine cell cycle and the effects on growth and then investigate how gene expression affects cell differentiation during development.

1.2.6

photosynthesis

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I examines photosynthesis in the context of energy storage. In lab we also spend several weeks growing plants under a variety of conditions to investigate variation in rates of photosynthesis.

1.2.7

cellular respiration

B

BL131 General Biology I

BL131  General Biology I examines cellular respiration from  several angles. In lecture we cover the chemistry of ATP formation, then in lab we have several weeks of experiments looking at aerobic and anaerobic respiration as well as decomposition and human respiration

1.3

Concepts of Heredity, including

 

 In BL131 candidates learn about gene function, transcription and translation, and genetic engineering, among other topics.

 

1.3.1

Mendelian genetics

B

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.2

traits passed from one generation to the next

C

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.3

molecular genetics (structure of DNA)

A

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.4

modern genetics (electrophoresis, genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting, etc.)

A

BL131 BL131 General Biology I

1.3.5

environmental effects on heredity

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.4

Evolutionary Change, including

 

 The theory of evolution and evolutionary change is fundamental to environmental science and biology and is a recurring theme in NS103/104. The change in a species gene pool over time by differential reproduction provides an explanation of why diversity exists and how loss of diversity, i.e. extinction, reduces the potential for future evolutionary change.  The concepts of pest resistance and genetically modified organisms are linked to this topic in NS103/104.

 

1.4.1

diversity/speciation

A

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.4.2

theory of evolution (adaptation, variation, and natural selection and relationships between species, including human)

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.4.3

fossils/ancient life

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.4.4

Extinction

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

1.5

Ecological Systems, including

 

The structure of ecosystems, how ecosystems transfer mass and energy and how ecosystems are linked to the major biogeochemical cycles, population dynamics, and succession constitute the first 25% of NS103/104.  The unifying concepts stressed throughout these courses are the conservation of mass and the first and second laws of thermodynamics.  Current environmental issues are used to provide a context for these concepts and natural ecosystems are used as models to explore the concept of sustainability for the human built environment.

1.5.1

community relationships, including predator/prey and symbiosis

C

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.5.2

Population

A

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.5.3

transfer of energy (food chains/webs)

C

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.5.4

biogeochemical cycles

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.5.5

human impact

B

  NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.6

Human Biology, including

 

 NS103/104 explores the relationship between environmental health and human health and populations.  Most environmental stresses are linked to human population growth and lack of sustainable management practices.  For example, in discussing indoor and outdoor air pollution, smoking risk and its adverse human health impacts is placed in context with air pollution such as photochemical smog and fine particulate matter.  

1.6.1

anatomy and physiology

B

BL107 Field Biology BL107 Field Biology

The concepts are extended in BL132 Gen Biol II

1.6.2

disease and immunology

A

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.6.3

health habits

B

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.6.4

resource management

C

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.6.5

human population growth and diversity

B

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

1.7

Earth/Space Science, including

The major concepts of Earth/space science are taught through a slate of courses addressing general physical and integrated historical geology course, the hydrosphere and space science. Each course has an associated required laboratory (2 hours per week).  GE121  is the foundation for the program, serving as prerequisite for all courses above the 100 level, where Intro to Geology is a survey course covering similar content.  The hydrosphere is addressed in both oceanography and meteorology/climatology, albeit from slightly different perspectives.  NS119 addresses the essential issues of space science. Laboratory exercises provide opportunity for both confirmation and demonstration of concepts taught in lecture, as well as a vehicle for students to construct new knowledge and understandings.  Course syllabi and expanded course objectives identify the key concepts, laboratory activities and assessment elements.

1.7.1

lithosphere and historical geology

B

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

or  NS102

 

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

or  NS102

 

1.7.2

Hydrosphere

C

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

1.7.3

atmosphere, weather, climate

C

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

GG 108 (108 lab)

or

NS 116

 

1.7.4

Astronomy

B

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

or  NS102

 

GE 121

(expanded objectives for GE 121-122)

 

or  NS102 and extended knowledge gained in

NS 119 Astronomy

1.8

Chemistry and Physics:

Major Concepts and Principles of Physics and Chemistry

 

 

 

1.8.1

Inorganic Chemistry, including

 

 Following the guidelines of the successful ACS Chemistry in Context series, NS110 teaches the concepts and methodology of chemistry within the context of real world issues such as water quality, air quality, food, etc.

 

1.8.1.1

atomic/molecular structure and bonding

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.2

stoichiometry

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.3

gas laws

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.4

states of matter

C

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.5

Equilibria

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.6

acid-bases

B

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.7

electrochemistry

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

1.8.1.8

nomenclature

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

CH105 Life Chemistry II and

NS110 Chemistry in Society

 

1.8.1.9

qualitative analysis

A

NS110 Chemistry in Society

NS110 Chemistry in Society

1.8.2

Physics, including

 

Candidates complete an applied course in the topics of physics addressing the key content areas of mechanics, electricity, thermodynamics and waves.  In addition, our applied environmental course provides instruction and exercises in the topics of thermodynamics.  Both courses have a strong laboratory component.

 

1.8.2.1

mechanics

B

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

1.8.2.2

electricity and magnetism

B

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

1.8.2.3

thermodynamics

A

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

and

NS103/104 Introduction to Environmental Science

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

and

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

 

1.8.2.4

waves, vibrations, and optics

B

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

NS101  (lab) Conceptual Physics

 

 


 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences
Fulfill the Standards for Elementary Programs

No.

Standard/Guideline

Group Minor

Group Major

 

The preparation of elementary integrated science teachers will enable them to:

 

 

2.0

apply mathematics, including statistics, to investigations in the sciences, including the analysis of data;

MA207 Statistics

MA207 Statistics (or equivalent) is required for all elementary education students as a cognate of the professional education sequence.  Mathematics is applied to numerical problem solving many of the courses required in the program, and in particular in chemistry and physics.

3.0

relate the study of science to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues; in particular, relate the concepts of science to current controversies such as cloning, genetically-modified food, the use of energy, exploitation of resources, global changes, and medical research, as well as other issues;

 NS103/104 Intro to Environmental Science

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

It is possible to teach environmental science from an ecosystem perspective or from an anthropocentric point of view.  The human centered approach is emphasized in NS103/104 and each topic is put into the context of how it affects man and how man affects the capacity of the natural world to provide essential natural services.  Four major topics permeate the discussion in NS103/104: human population, global atmospheric change, loss of biodiversity and loss of ecosystem function. For example, current energy consumption, energy sources and problems are discussed in the context of climate change, acid precipitation, nuclear power, alternative energy sources, conservation and sustainability.

4.0

locate appropriate resources, design and conduct inquiry-based open-ended scientific investigations, interpret findings, communicate results, and make judgments based on evidence;

 NS103/104 Intro to Environmental Science

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

NS103/104 promotes active learning through the companion laboratory by  requiring the student to design many of their laboratory experiments from the ground up based on what they have researched  and learned in the lecture portion of the course.  Results are reported through written formal lab reports, oral reports and group discussion.

5.0

construct new knowledge for themselves through research, reading and discussion, and reflect in an informed way on the role of science in human affairs;

 NS103/104 Intro to Environmental Science

NS103 Introduction to Environmental Science and NS104 associated laboratory

NS103/104 unlike many environmental science courses takes an anthropocentric viewpoint and focuses on learning how the natural environment can serve as a model for sustainable human environments and systems.  After understanding the connections between science, economics, and the socio-political, the students are challenged to discuss and articulate the questions and resource management issues regarding the intrinsic value of all species and ecosystems

 

6.0

understand and promote the maintenance of a safe science classroom as identified by the Council of State Science Supervisors, including the ethical and appropriate use and care for living organisms and scientific equipment, and the safe storage, use, and disposal of chemicals;

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

7.0

demonstrate competence in the practice of teaching as defined within the Entry Level Standards for Michigan Teachers;

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

8.0

create and maintain an educational environment in which conceptual understanding will occur for all science students;

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

9.0

develop an understanding and appreciation for the nature of scientific inquiry; and

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

10.0

demonstrate competence in the practice of teaching through investigative experiences and by demonstrating the application of the scientific process and in assessing student learning through multiple processes.

 TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers