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Course Descriptions: DI Secondary (DI)

BIOLOGY
Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these.
 
 BL102 Careers in Natural Resources (1,0) 1
A seminar course to present students with strategies for successful job hunting. Presentations by natural resource professionals will give students outlooks and insights into the natural resource job market.
 
BL105 Function of the Human Body (3,2) 4
Survey of the functional anatomy and the related physiological processes needed for the understanding of normal human activity. Not open to biological majors or minors. Prerequisite: Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent.
 
BL107 Field Biology (2,3) 3
Introduction to organisms and their environmental interactions and conservation concerns with emphasis on Eastern UP. Lab consists primarily of field experiences. Not open to biology majors. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency (SA091 or satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam).

BL109/110/111 were renumbered by the department to BL131/132.  Course descriptions for these are as follows:

BL131 General Biology I (3,2) 4 An introduction to general biology. This course will provide an overview of biology and serve as a framework for further biological studies. Deliberations on the nature and philosophy of science (especially biology) will provide a basis for discussion of ecology, evolution, and cell biology. Prerequisites: Satisfy the LSSU reading profi ciency requirement; MA086, EN091, or equivalent scores on the math and English placement exams.

BL132 General Biology II (3,3) 4 An introduction to the diversity of life, including the morphology, physiology, reproduction, general habitats and taxonomy of organisms. Adaptation to environment and modern concepts of evolution are stressed as unifying themes throughout the course. Prerequisite: BL131. Note: “C” (2.0) or better is required to use this course as a prerequisite for other BL/EV courses.

 
BL109 General Biology (3,2) 4
An introduction to general biology. This course will provide an overview of biology and serve as a framework for further biological studies. Deliberations on the nature and philosophy of science (especially biology) will provide a basis for discussion of ecology, evolution, and cell biology. Prerequisites: Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent, MA086, EN091, or equivalent/ satisfactory scores on ACT or the math, reading and English placement exams.
 
BL110 General Zoology (1.5,1.5) 2
Introduction to the diversity of the animal kingdom, invertebrates and vertebrates. Adaptation and evolution are stressed as unifying themes throughout the course. Prerequisite: BL109. Note: “C” (2.0) or better is required to use this course as a prerequisite for other BL/EV courses.
 
BL111 General Botany (1.5,1.5) 2
Introduction to the diversity of the plant kingdom. Will include the morphology, physiology, reproduction and general habitat of organisms traditionally considered as plants but with an organization reflecting modern concepts of evolutionary relationships. Prerequisite: BL109. Note: “C” (2.0) or better is required to use this course as a prerequisite for other BL/EV courses.
 
BL121 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3,3) 4
This is the first half of a two-course sequence. This course covers organization of the human body, basic principles of chemistry, the integumentary system, the skeletal and muscular systems, the nervous system and special senses. Laboratory experiences are designed to compliment the lecture topics. This course may not be used as a general education natural science elective nor does this sequence apply toward a major or minor in biological science. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent.
 
BL122 Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3,3) 4
The second half of the Human Anatomy and Physiology sequence emphasizes the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatics and the immune response, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system and the reproductive system. Laboratory experiences are coordinated with the lecture discussions. Prerequisite: BL121.
 
BL140 Introduction to Fisheries & Wildlife (1,0) 1
A discussion of the history, philosophy and practice of fisheries and wildlife conservation. An introduction to the role and professional responsibilities of resource managers. Prerequisite: Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent.
 
BL199 Freshman Seminar (1,0) 1
Students meet in discipline-based, studentfaculty groups in conjunction with BL299, BL399 and BL499. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Freshmen will assist with ongoing projects and will be guided by faculty and seniors enrolled in BL499 to generate and interpret data from these projects. Prerequisite: MA092. Pre- or corequisite: BL109.
 
BL201 Plant Morphology (2,3) 3
A survey of the principal groups of plants from the standpoint of their structure, development and reproduction. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary relationships as revealed by comparisons of the structural and reproductive traits. Prerequisite: BL111.
 
BL202 Field Botany (2,3) 3
A course whose main objective is to allow the student to be able to recognize common families, genera, and species, especially those in the local flora. Prerequisite: BL111.
 
BL204 General Microbiology (3,3) 4
This course will deal with the history and scope of microbiology, a study of microbial structure, growth, nutrition, metabolism, genetics, taxonomy and control. A study of mycoplasma, viruses and molds will be incorporated with genetic engineering and recombinant DNA. Labs will emphasize the identification and cultivation of molds and bacteria. Prerequisites: CH104, CH108 or CH116.
 
BL220 Genetics (3,3) 4
A study of the nature, transmission, recombination and function of hereditary material in animals, plants and microorganisms. The lecture includes Mendelian, molecular and population genetics. The laboratory includes exercises in Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, recombinant DNA, and computer simulations of population genetics. Meets ethics component of general education requirements. Prerequisites: BL110, BL111 and CH116. A statistics course is strongly recommended.
 
BL223 Clinical Microbiology (3,0) 3
A basic course in microbiology dealing with the study of microorganisms and pathogens in humans. A survey of viruses, molds and bacteria. Their morphology and growth characteristics will be discussed along with the physical and chemical means to control pathogenic microorganisms causing human infections. Prerequisites: CH105 and BL122. Does not apply towards a major or minor in biology.
 
BL230 Introduction to Soil Science (3,3) 4
A course dealing with the soil ecosystem as a natural resource and as an environmental medium. Beginning with factors involved in soil formation the course will survey soil physical, chemical, and organic properties and how they respond to disturbance. Soil reactions to wastes and wetland interactions will be discussed. Laboratories will focus on description of local soils and the use of soil survey information in making soil interpretations. Prerequisites: CH108 or above; NS103 or BL110 and BL111.
 
BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates (3,0) 3
A survey course covering the taxonomy, phylogeny and ecology of vertebrates with an emphasis on North American taxa. Prerequisite: BL107 or BL110.
 
BL243 Vertebrate Anatomy (3,3) 4
A detailed study of the origin, phylogeny and anatomy of the vertebrates. Laboratories emphasize the thorough dissection of representatives of at least three classes of vertebrates. Prerequisite: BL110 and sophomore standing.
 
BL280 Biometrics (2,2) 3
The application of inferential statistical methods to biological problems. The focus of the course is a systematic method for determining an appropriate statistical technique. Parametric and nonparametric procedures will be covered. Prerequisites: MA207 and MA111.
 
BL284 Principles of Forestry (2,4) 4
A course introducing forest ecology, structure and function with emphasis on impacts of disturbance and outcomes of management on forest ecosystems. Students will master identification of tree and shrub species of the Eastern Upper Peninsula and become proficient with commonly used techniques to evaluate the forest resource. The lab portion of the course is in the field and proper dress is required. In addition, one all-day field trip will be scheduled. Prerequisite: EV125/126.
 
BL286 Principles of Watersheds (3,0) 3
 Overview of the geomorphology, hydrology and biota of various watersheds, with emphasis on hydrographic methods, sampling techniques, land use and management principles. Prerequisites: MA111 and BL140.
 
BL290 Independent Study in Biology (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in biology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of department and college dean. Prerequisites: Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no I grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the School of Natural Science.
 
BL299 Sophomore Seminar (1,0) 1
Students meet in discipline-based, studentfaculty groups in conjunction with BL199, BL399 and BL499. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Sophomores will assist with ongoing projects and will be guided by faculty and juniors enrolled in BL399 to conduct a comprehensive, annotated literature search in their area of interest. Prerequisite: BL199 and EN111.
 
BL302 Invertebrate Zoology (3,2) 4
A study of the invertebrate groups with emphasis on morphology, phylogeny and life cycles. Prerequisites: BL110 and sophomore standing.
 
BL303 General Entomology (2,3) 3
An introduction to the biology, ecology and systematics of the insects. This course covers fundamentals of insect taxonomy and classification; insect anatomy and physiology; and the varied roles insects play in the natural world and in human history and culture. Prerequisites: BL110, BL111 and MA111.
 
BL310 Ichthyology (2,3) 3
Study of the anatomy, physiology, behavior, taxonomy and natural history of fishes, with emphasis on freshwater species. Prerequisites: BL110 and BL240.
 
BL311 Mammalogy (2,3) 3
An investigation of the natural history, biology and taxonomy of mammals. Techniques for measuring and monitoring mammalian populations will be presented. The laboratory will focus on field techniques and the identification by skin, skull and track of mammals of the Great Lakes region. Prerequisites: BL110 and BL240.
 
BL312 Ornithology (2,4) 3
The biology and taxonomy of birds. Labs will focus upon bird anatomy and bird recognition using video tapes and specimens. Prerequisites: BL110 and BL240.
 
BL315 Plant Physiology (3,3) 4
Organization of plants, plant replication, photophysiology and photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, water transport in higher plants, plant growth substances, physiology of seeds, control of plant growth and plant cell tissue culture. Prerequisites: BL111 and CH116, both with grade of C or better.
 
BL330 Animal Physiology (3,3) 4
The course examines the many ways animal groups solve the problem of maintaining internal homeostasis. Neural control, endocrine systems, gas exchange, energy acquisition and temperature regulation are a few of the topics examined. The lab is closely tied to the lecture material using non-invasive live animal experiments, computer-interfaced data gathering and analysis. Prerequisites: BL110 with a C (2.00) or better and CH116 with a C (2.00) or better.
 
BL332 Embryology (2,2) Alternate Years 3
A study of pattern formation and morphogenic processes in animals, with an emphasis on vertebrates. The laboratory portion of the course emphasizes descriptive ontogeny of representative vertebrates. Prerequisites: BL110, sophomore standing. (BL243 is highly recommended.)
 
BL333 Fish Ecology (3,0) 3
A study of the relationship of fishes to their physical, chemical and biological environments in natural and perturbed aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on response and adaptation at the organism, population and community levels. Various types of aquatic ecosystems will be examined with respect to habitat accommodations of fish and the impact of human activities. Includes ecological principles as applied to important sport, commercial and forage fish species. Prerequisite: BL310.
 
BL337 General Ecology (2,3) 3
A survey of concepts of plant and animal autecology, population ecology and community ecology. Prerequisites: BL110, BL111 and MA111 .
 
BL339 Wildlife Ecology (3,0) 3
A theoretical analysis of the distribution, structure and dynamics of animal populations. The influence of biotic and abiotic limiting factors on wildlife populations. Community interactions including competition, predation, and herbivory are explored in detail. Prerequisites: BL240, BL280 and BL337.
 
BL345 Limnology (2,3) 3
An investigation of the principles of freshwater ecosystems with an emphasis on lakes. The physics and chemistry of natural systems are presented, as well as a survey of the dominant biota and their ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BL110 and CH116.
 
BL372 Freshwater Fish Culture (2,3) 3
 Instruction in water quality monitoring, production systems, feeding and nutrition, disease identification and management, and reproduction principles of freshwater fishes used for recreational and commercial fisheries management, bait and food products. Students will learn propagation and rearing techniques for important fishes, particularly those with recreational or commercial value. Prerequisites: BL280 and BL310.
 
BL380 Clinical Hematology and Hemostasis (3,3) Alternate Years 4
A study of the components of blood. Discussions of the formed elements to include normal and malignant states; anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, hemostasis (coagulation) processes and disease states. Laboratories will cover routine and automated blood component measurements. Offered even-numbered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CH226 and BL330.
 
BL399 Junior Seminar (1,0) 1
Students meet in discipline-based, student faculty groups in conjunction with BL199, BL299 and BL499. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Juniors will serve as mentors to sophomores in the group and will develop and present a proposal for a scholarly project. Prerequisites: BL280, BL299 and SD101.
 
BL401 Honors Program I (0,8) 4
Biological sciences honors program I. (Open to students earning a bachelor of science degree in biological sciences with a grade point of 3.5 or higher). An undergraduate research project will be outlined in consultation with the supervising instructor and submitted to the department for approval. Outline must be approved before the first semester of the senior year. All grades for this sequence will be deferred until the final semester. Eight credit hours of honors credit will be substituted for eight hours of electives upon successful completion of the research sequence. The independent study courses will not be open to students electing the honors program sequence. The completed research may be used for senior thesis.
 
BL402 Honors Program II (0,8) 4
Biological sciences honors program II. This is a continuation of the honors research sequence. Prerequisite: BL401.
 
BL405 Animal Behavior (3,0) Alternate Years 3
A course designed to examine the proximate mechanisms and the evolutionary development of animal behavior. Important concepts are explained by reference to illustrative studies. An appreciation of the methods and theoretical significance of current research is emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior standing and BL330 or BL337. Offered even-numbered fall semesters.
 
BL408 Vascular Plant Systematics (3,0) 3
A course covering the principles of plant systematics including the history of taxonomy, systems and approaches to classification, rules of nomenclature, and techniques used in modem biosystematics. Prerequisites: BL202, BL220 and BL337.
 
BL420 Population Genetics and Evolution (3,0) 3
A course including historical and modern concepts of evolutionary theory. Some coverage of origin of life concepts will be included. Prerequisite: BL220.
 
BL421 Cell Biology (3,3) 4
Cellular structure and function with emphasis on organelle ultrastructure, molecular organization of the cell, cell membranes and permeability, the cytoskeleton and cellular interactions. Prerequisites: BL220 and CH451.
 
BL422 Parasitology (2,2) 3
A study of the morphology, taxonomy, habitats and life cycles of parasites. Prerequisite: BL110.
 
BL423 Immunology (3,3) 4
A study of the basic elements of the immune response system and the various ways in which the immune system can fail, leading to immunopathological reactions. Labs will include current diagnostic methodologies. Prerequisites: BL110, BL204 and CH226.
 
BL430 Endocrinology (2,0) 2
A study of the major vertebrate endocrine systems with the greatest emphasis placed on mammals. Prerequisite: a course in physiology.
 
BL432 Fisheries Management (2,3) 3
A course covering the history, theory and practice of fisheries management with an emphasis on basic strategies used in effective management of fish populations in freshwater ecosystems. Students will learn methods of collection and synthesis of data regarding fish population dynamics and manipulation, habitat modification, and human management to achieve specific fisheries management goals and objectives. Prerequisites: BL280 and BL333.
 
BL433 Histology (2,2) Alternate Years 3
A systems approach is used to study the microscopic anatomy of mammalian tissues and organs. Related physiological processes are integrated with the anatomical studies. Prerequisites: BL110 and junior standing.
 
BL437 Plant Ecology (2,3) 3
A study of the autecology, population ecology and community ecology of plants, including fundamental theory, field methods and data analysis. Prerequisites: BL202, BL337 and MA207.
 
BL439 Wildlife Management (2,3) 3
The application of ecological principles to develop practical wildlife management strategies to preserve, enhance or create viable wildlife habitats and populations. Students will have the opportunity to observe and practice standard field and laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: BL311, BL312 and BL339.
 
BL450 Laboratory Apprenticeship (0,3) per credit 1-2
Students will assist in laboratories, learning instructional techniques, under direction of faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Students must gain approval of the faculty member in charge of the specific laboratory, and the dean. Credits may be used as BL electives. This is a credit/no credit course.
 
BL460 Clinical Laboratory Science Internship 30
(15 credits per semester for a maximum of 30 credits) Practical and didactic training with certified laboratory personnel. Branch training is supplemented by informal lectures, oral quizzes and written examinations. Offered only at approved or affiliated hospital laboratories. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required college course work.
 
BL475 Aquatic Entomology (2,3) 3
Survey and identification of regional lake and stream insects, with additional emphasis on lifehistory strategies and community ecology. Insect physiology, ecology, behavior, importance as fish food organisms, and utility as indicators of water quality is also presented. Prerequisites: BL330 and BL337.
 
BL480 Advanced Clinical Microbiology (2,3) Alternate Years 3
An advanced course in clinical microbiology concerning the role of bacteria, viruses, and fungi as the cause of various human infections. Standard modern clinical laboratory methodology will be covered. Offered odd-numbered spring semesters. Prerequisites: BL204 and CH226.
 
BL490 Independent Study in Biology (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in biology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of department and college dean. Prerequisites: Students must have junior or senior standing, have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no I grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the School of Natural Science.
 
BL495 Senior Project (0,3-9) 1-3
A variable-credit practicum. Students, under the guidance of a faculty mentor, conduct a scholarly project based on the proposal submitted by the student in BL399 (or an appropriate substitute). Credit for the course is based on the scope of the proposed project. May be repeated once for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: BL399.
 
BL499 Senior Seminar (1,0) 1
Students meet in discipline-based, studentfaculty groups in conjunction with BL199, BL299 and BL399. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Seniors will serve as mentors to freshmen in the group. Seniors will also produce a manuscript describing the results of their project and will be required to give poster and oral presentations to the University community. Prerequisite BL399. Pre or corequisite: BL495.    

 

CHEMISTRY
Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develops. Consult the semester
course schedule for these.
 
CH091 Basic Chemistry (2,0) 2
Thorough exposure to elementary chemistry designed to prepare students for college-level chemistry. Emphasis on drill to enhance problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: MA084 or equivalent. Students must receive a C (2.0) or better in this course to qualify for CH104, CH108 or CH115. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation.
 
CH104 Life Chemistry I  (3,0) 3
An introduction to selected principles of chemistry, including organic chemistry, with emphasis on their physiological importance and their applications to nursing and other health related professions. This course does not apply toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisites: Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent and pre or corequisite of MA092.
 
CH105 Life Chemistry II (3,2) 4
A continuation of organic chemistry presented in CH104 as well as a presentation of the chemical processes taking place in metabolism. The interrelationships between the metabolic processes of living systems are discussed along with their underlying chemical reactions. Prerequisite: CH104 or equivalent, with a grade of C (2.00) or better.
 
CH108 Applied Chemistry (3,0) 3
An introduction to selected principles of chemistry with emphasis on technological applications. Credit in this course does not apply toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisites: Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent and pre- or corequisite of MA092.
 
CH109 Applied Chemistry Lab (0,3) 1
Laboratory experience for CH108 Applied Chemistry (must complete both lecture and laboratory to qualify for general education credit). Corequisite: CH108.
 
CH115 General Chemistry I (4,3) 5
Fundamental principles of chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, molecular structure and stoichiometry. Pre- or corequisite of MA111 or higher with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Reading ACT of 19 or equivalent. One year of high school chemistry is strongly recommended.
 
CH116 General Chemistry II (3,3) 4
Continuation of CH115 with emphasis on equilibrium. Prerequisite: CH115 with a grade C (2.0) or better.
 
CH220 Survey of Organic Chemistry (3,3) 4
A brief course in organic chemistry covering the nomenclature, structure, reactions and preparations of the important classes of organic compounds. It will also provide students with an introduction to spectrometric analysis of organic compounds and the chemistry of bio-organic compounds. The laboratory includes experiments in the isolation and preparation of typical organic compounds using microscale apparatus. Not open to students in chemistry or environmental chemistry degree programs. Prerequisite: CH116.
 
CH225 Organic Chemistry I (3,3) 4
Fundamental principles of organic chemistry, covering the structures, reactions and properties of aliphatic and alicyclic compounds. The course will introduce the study of organic nomenclature, functional group chemistry, stereochemistry, reactive intermediates, organic synthesis, reaction mechanisms and conjugated unsaturated systems. The laboratory introduces basic organic laboratory techniques and includes experiments in organic separations, synthesis, and analysis. Prerequisite: CH116 with a grade C (2.00) or better.
 
CH226 Organic Chemistry II (3,3) 4
A continuation of CH225 covering the structures properties and reactions of aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids  and their functional derivatives, phenols, amines, organometallics, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins. The course will introduce the study of spectral methods of structure determination and expand the study of organic synthesis and mechanisms. The laboratory will include experiments in spectroscopy, organic synthesis and mechanisms, qualitative organic analysis, and instrumental analysis. Prerequisite: CH225
with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
 
CH231 Quantitative Analysis (3,3) 4
Evaluation of analytical data and study of gravimetric and titrimetric methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CH116 with a grade of C (2.0) or better and MA151, MA143 or MA112.
 
CH290 Independent Study in Chemistry (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in chemistry for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of school dean. Prerequisites: Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no I grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the School of Science and Natural Resources office.
 
CH332 Instrumental Analysis (3,3) 4
Continuation of CH231. An instrumental analysis course involving the theory and use of spectrochemical, electroanalytical and separation methods for the characterization and determination of selected chemical substances. Prerequisite: CH231.
 
CH341 Environmental Chemistry I: Water and Water Pollution Control (3,3) 4
A study of the environmental chemistry of water, the measurement and remediation of water quality problems, the toxicology of water pollutants, and the environmental aspects of energy use. Prerequisites: CH220 or CH225 and CH226, CH231, and NS103. Also listed as EV341.
 
CH342 Environmental Chemistry II: Air and Solid Wastes (3,3) 4
A study of the environmental chemistry of the atmosphere and the geosphere, including the measurement and remediation of air pollution and soil contamination problems. The nature and handling of hazardous wastes will also be covered. Prerequisites: CH220 or CH225 and CH226, CH231 and NS103.
 
CH361 Physical Chemistry I (4,0) 4
Chemical thermodynamics with applications to both phase and chemical equilibria. Prerequisites: CH116, one year of calculus and one year of physics.
 
CH362 Physical Chemistry II (3,3) 4
Continuation of CH361 with emphasis on chemical dynamics, quantum chemistry, and structure. Laboratory experiments complement the lecture. Prerequisite: CH361.
 
CH450 Laboratory Apprenticeship (0,3) per credit 1-2
Students will assist in laboratories, learning instructional techniques, under direction of
faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Students must gain approval of
the faculty member in charge of the specific laboratory, and the school dean. Credits may
used as CH electives. This is a credit/no credit course.
 
CH451 Introductory Biochemistry (3,3) 4
Introduction to the chemistry of biological molecules, including the general properties chemical transformation of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic Emphasis will be on correlating chemical
reactions with biological function. An introduction to the intermediary metabolism of the carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids and nucleic acids will also be presented. Prerequisite: CH226.
 
CH452 Biochemistry II: Intermediary Metabolism (3,0) 3
A continuation of introductory biochemistry a more-detailed study of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and nitrogen containing molecules such as amino acids and nucleotides. Emphasis will be placed on the similarities
differences among the various metabolic pathways and cycles. The interrelationships exist among the various metabolic processes also be discussed. An introduction to the genetic code and its relationship to nucleic
and protein biosynthesis will also be presented. Prerequisite: CH451.
 
CH453 Introductory Toxicology (3,0) Alternate Years 3
An introduction to toxicology, including its history, types of poisons, their mode of
operation and the biochemistry of detoxification. Environmental problems caused by toxic contaminants will be discussed. Prerequisite: CH451.
 
CH490 Independent Study in Chemistry (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in chemistry individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of school dean. Prerequisites: Students must have junior
or senior standing, have an overall GPA of least 2.5, and no I grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the School of Science and Natural Resources office.
 
 
GEOLOGY
Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these.
 
GE115 Field Excursions in Earth Science (2,4) 4
A field- and project-based educational experience in which aspects of geology, including environmental geology, earth resources, tectonic processes and the interrelationships among geology and other natural sciences, will be addressed. Travel destinations will include regions with unique natural history. Prerequisite: SA091 or equivalent satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam. Credit can be earned for only one of NS102, GE115 and GE121.
 
GE121 Physical and Historical Geology I (3,2) 4
The study of processes and features of the rocks and surficial materials that form the Earth’s crust. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamic earth including volcanoes, plate tectonics, geologic time, catastrophic events such as earthquakes, and natural resources and their impact on society. The class requires student projects and emphasizes active problem-solving. Laboratory exercises involve minerals, rocks, topographic and geologic maps. Prerequisites: SA091 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or placement exam. Credit can be earned for only one of NS102, GE115, and GE121.
 
GE122 Physical and Historical Geology II (3,2) 4
The study of surficial processes and landforms in the context of their historical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on evolution of the earth; stratigraphic principles, tectonic framework of North America; landforms and depositional environments; climate, weathering, surficial processes, and sea level changes; and significant events in the history of plants and animals. Laboratory exercises involve geologic maps, invertebrate paleontology, and surficial processes including environmental applications. Prerequisite: GE121 or NS 102 or GE115.
 
GE218 Structural Geology and Tectonics (3,6) 5
A study of the deformation of the Earth through a project-centered approach that focuses on actual tectonic problems. Emphasis will be placed on descriptive, kinematic and dynamic analysis of geologic structures, deformation mechanisms and the evolution of each in the context of the regional and global geology. Prerequisite: GE122.
 
GE223 Mineralogy and Petrology (3,6) 5
A laboratory course emphasizing hand-sample techniques for identification of minerals and rocks. Major topics include: physical properties, crystalline structure, and chemical composition of minerals; classification of minerals and rocks; origins of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; plate tectonic occurrence of minerals and rock assemblages; and societal and economic significance of minerals and rocks. Prerequisite: GE122 or NS102. Pre- or corequisite: CH115.
 
GE280 Introduction to Field Geology (0,9) 3
Introduction to field methods in geology including measurement of sections, mapping techniques, and field interpretation of outcrops. A variety of geologic provinces and environments will be examined. A supply and travel fee will be charged. Prerequisites: GE218 and GE223.
 
GE290 Independent Study in Geology (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in geology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the school dean. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
 
GE311 Principles of Hydrology (3,0) alternate years 3
Origin, movement and uses of water with emphasis on water resources in relation to human needs and environmental considerations. Hydrologic principles, runoff analysis, flood routing, urban hydrology, floodplain hydraulics, groundwater hydrology. Prerequisite: PH221 or PH231. Prior computer programming experience recommended.
 
GE312 Groundwater Hydrology (3,0) alternate years 3
Uses, preservation and protection of ground water. Physics and chemistry of ground water. Influences of geological structures and ground water exploration. Hydraulics and modeling techniques for ground water and water wells. Water well design, construction and testing. Prerequisites: PH221, 222 or PH231, PH232; GE311; and a course in computer programming.
 
GE321 Optical Mineralogy (2,3) alternate years 3
Optical properties of minerals and their underlying principles studied by oil immersion and thin section methods. Laboratory work consists of measuring optical properties and learning to identify unknown non-opaque minerals. Prerequisite: GE221.
 
GE331 Introduction to Geophysics (4,0) alternate years 4
This course will include an introduction to gravity, magnetic, electric, seismic and radiometric geophysical techniques and their application to geophysical, geological and environmental problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the principles, techniques and applications of each to solving specific geologic/environmental problems and to understanding the structure and history of the earth. Prerequisite: GE112. Pre- or corequisites: MA112 or MA143 or MA151 and PH222 or PH232.
 
GE351 Invertebrate Paleontology I (3,1) alternate years 3
Common invertebrate fossils, their evolutionary trends, anatomical features and geological significance. Special emphasis upon use of fossils for geologic dating and correlation, fossil description and classification. Prerequisite: GE215.
 
GE352 Invertebrate Paleontology II (3,1) alternate years 3
Common invertebrate fossils and microfossils, their evolutionary trends, anatomical features and geological significance. Special emphasis upon use of fossils for geologic dating and correlation and use of paleontologic data. Prerequisite: GE351.
 
GE410 Engineering Geology (3,2) 4
This course examines rock types and stratigraphy, geological structures, surface processes, earth materials and methods of geological investigation in the context of behavior of soils and rocks as related to planning and construction. The course includes coverage of in-situ investigations including shallow geophysical methods and emphasizes environmental applications and concerns. Prerequisites: MA141 or MA151, CS100 or CS111, PH221 or PH231.
 
GE422 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrography (2,3) alternate years 3
Description and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks including laboratory study of rocks in thin section. Prerequisite: GE321.
 
GE423 Sedimentary Petrography (2,2) alternate years 3
The study of the history of sedimentary rocks with emphasis placed upon depositional models. Major topics include lithology, facies and microfacies recognition and relationships, and diagenesis. Prerequisites: GE215 and GE321.
 
GE434 Geotectonics (2,2) alternate years 3
A study of the general structure of the earth with emphasis on the dynamics of continental and oceanic crust. Includes a history of geologic thought leading to plate tectonics, with appropriate laboratory and student research projects. Prerequisites: GE222 and GE216.
 
GE436 Field Geology (0,16) alternate summers 6
Six weeks of training and field experience in the observation, mapping, recording and interpretation of the great variety of geologic features in the Sault Ste. Marie region. Some extended field trips will be required. A supply and travel fee will be charged. Prerequisites: GE216 and GE222 and senior status.
 
GE461 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (4,1) alternate years 4 The study and interpretation of sedimentary processes and stratigraphic principles, emphasis on sedimentary relationships and depositional environments. Prerequisite: GE215.
 
GE471 Economic Geology I (3,2) alternate years 4
A survey of major resource-forming processes, including ore deposits, industrial minerals and rocks, coal, crude oil and natural gas. Related topics include land ownership and mineral rights, exploration techniques, production methods, marketing strategies and economic aspects. Case studies related to resource exploration and extraction, as well as environmental impact of such activities, are incorporated to illustrate ethical dilemmas in the geosciences and approaches for resolving them. Laboratory exercises appropriate to the topics and a student research project. Prerequisites: GE112 and GE22 or equivalent.
 
GE472 Economic Geology II (2,2) alternate years 3
A continuation of the resource forming processes and deposits begun in GE471. Coverage of minor metals, industrial minerals, energy resources, and the economic, environmental and political aspects of the demand for limited resources are included as time permits. Student research project and field trip. Prerequisite: GE471.
 
GE490 Research Topics in Geology (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in geology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the school dean. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher.
 
 
GEOGRAPHY
Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these.
 
GG106 Physical Geography: Landforms (3,2) 4
Introduction to the description and distribution of landforms with emphasis on lithospheric, hydrospheric and atmospheric relationships. Natural (physical) science credit given. Prerequisite: Completion of mathematics competency graduation requirement. Credit for both GG106 and NS107 not permitted.
 
GG108 Physical Geography: Meteorology and Climatology (3,2) 4
Introduction to earth-sun relationships, maps and elementary principles of atmospheric science. Natural (physical) science credit given. Prerequisite: MA086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam. Credit for both GG108 and NS105 not permitted. on sedimentary relationships and depositional environments. Prerequisite: GE215.
 
 
 
 
NATURAL SCIENCES Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these.
 
NS101 Conceptual Physics (3,2) 4
A survey of basic physical science principles emphasizing their applications in daily life. Prerequisite: MA086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.
 
NS102 Introduction to Geology (3,2) 4
A survey course to acquaint students with the major concepts and phenomena inherent in a study of geology. It will also provide sufficient background for a better understanding of human relationships to the physical environment. Credit can be earned for only one of NS102, GE115 and GE121. Prerequisite: None.
 
NS103 Environmental Science (3,0) 3
An introduction to environmental concepts and a brief survey of environmental issues facing society. Emphasis is placed on solutions and the responsibility of the individual towards these solutions.
 
 
NS104 Environmental Science Laboratory (0,2) 1
Laboratory component of environmental science. Corequisite: NS103.
 
NS105 Physical Geography: Earth, Sun and Weather (3,1) alternate years 3
Study of the physical properties of the earth’s surface as they relate to weather and climate. Credit for both GG108 and NS105 not permitted. Prerequisite: None.
 
NS107 Physical Geography: Landforms and Soils (3,1) alternate years 3
Study of the physical properties of the earth’s surface as they relate to landforms and soils. Credit for both GG106 and NS107 not permitted. Prerequisite: None.
 
NS110 Chemistry in Society (3,2) 4
An applied topical course examining the issues, problems and challenges facing modern society with an emphasis on the underlying chemical principles and theories. Attention will be given to decision-making activities, to developing critical thinking skills, and to addressing social issues that relate to chemistry. Pre- or corequisite of MA092 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.
 
NS116 Introduction to Oceanography (3,2) 4
A survey of the features, processes and evolution of Earth’s ocean basins. The course will examine geological, physical, chemical and ecological aspects of oceanography with an emphasis on their interrelationships and their impact on humanity. Prerequisite: none.
 
NS119 Descriptive Astronomy (3,2) 4
Introductory course with a balanced, comprehensive account of contemporary astronomy with emphasis placed on the broad principles of astronomy rather than on a chronological or historical framework. Prerequisite: MA086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam. 
 
 
PHYSICS
Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these.
 
PH221 Elements of Physics I (3,2) 4
General principles of rigid body mechanics (kinematics, laws of motion, energy and momentum), fluid mechanics and thermal physics. Prerequisites: MA108 and MA111 or MA140.
 
PH222 Elements of Physics II (3,2) 4
Vibrations and waves, electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity and modern physics. Prerequisite: PH221 with a grade of C or better.
 
PH224 Topics in Physics for Electrical Technology (3,2) 4
Vibrations and waves, optics, relativity and modern physics (identical to PH222). Electricity and magnetism topics of particular relevance to electronic engineering technology. Prerequisites: PH221 with a grade of C or better, sophomore standing in EET course work, and MA141 (which may be taken concurrently).
 
PH231 Applied Physics for Engineers and Scientists I (3, 2) 4
An introductory course in rigid body mechanics and fluid mechanics using calculus with emphasis on practical applications. Intended primarily for students of engineering, physical science and mathematics. Prerequisite: MA151 or MA143.
 
PH232 Applied Physics for Engineers and Scientists II (3,2) 4
Continuation of PH231. Introduction to thermal physics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Prerequisite: PH231 with a grade of C or better.
 
PH290 Independent Study in Physics (1-4,0) 1-4
Special studies and/or research in physics for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the school dean. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher and permission of instructor.  

 

TEACHER EDUCATION
Special topics courses will be available as need and interest develop. Consult the semester
course schedule for these.
 
TE150 Reflections on Learning and Teaching (3,0) 3
Students will examine their experiences and assumptions about schooling in order to understand the multiple roles of teachers, characteristics of effective teaching practice, and the roles of school in society. Human development (physical, emotional and cognitive) is studied in terms of teaching and learning. Fieldwork required.
 
TE250 Student Diversity and Schools (3,0) 3
This is a study of the forms of diversity found among students and how these differences affect students’ participation in school. History and philosophy of American schools are also studied as are the legal responsibilities and rights of
teachers and schools. Students study cooperative learning, questioning techniques, make school visits and plan and teach a short, engaging lesson. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: sophomore standing and TE150 or concurrent enrollment in TE150.
 
TE301 Learning Theory and Teaching Practice (4,0) 4
A study of contemporary theories of human learning: how they are generated, researched and applied in teaching practices. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to teaching
and learning and the decisions which teachers make in applying theory to diverse classroom situations. Includes extensive classroom observations in K-12 schools. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: TE150, TE250 and
admission to teacher education program.
 
TE330 Reading in the Elementary Classroom (3,0) 3
Study of reading as a process of constructing meaning through dynamic, interaction among reader, the text, and the context of the reading situation. Includes objectives, content, materials, organization and methods of teaching
reading in the elementary school Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250 and admission to the teacher education program. Pre- or corequisite TE301.
 
TE410 Corrective Reading in the Classroom (3,0) 3
Study of classroom methods for the diagnosis of students’ reading strengths and weaknesses. Planning and implementing corrective and remedial interventions based on diagnosis. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150,
TE250, TE301, TE330 and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE411 Elementary Language Arts and Methods Across the Curriculum (3,0) 3
A study of general strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective learning including the use of language arts as a vehicle for integrated curriculum. Classroom management and organization for productive learning communities
are also studied. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301, TE330 and admission to teacher education program.
 
TE420 Math Methods for Elementary Teachers (2,0) 2
A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective mathematics instruction. Students learn to plan and present mathematics lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and
bench marks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to teacher education program.
 
TE421 Science Methods for Elementary Teachers (2,0) 2
A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective science instruction. Students learn to plan and present science lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks
in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE422 Social Studies Methods for Elementary Teachers (2,0) 2
A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective social studies instruction. Students learn to plan and present social studies lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE430 General Methods for Secondary Teachers (3,0) 3
A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate learning at the secondary level including classroom management and organization for productive learning communities. The multiple roles of the teacher in the secondary classroom
are examined including participant, colleague, researcher, reflective practitioner, accountable professional, counselor and mentor. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and
admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE431 The Secondary Learner (3,0) 3
A study of the dilemmas of adolescents as they affect students in secondary schools. The course focuses on the special needs and sensitivities of adolescents and implications for instruction and classroom management.
Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE440 Reading in the Content Area (3,0) 3
A study of reading methods appropriate to use secondary classrooms. Includes formal and informal assessment procedures for determining students’ abilities and the accompanying strategies to enhance content area comprehension and concept development. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in
planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE441 Language Arts Methods for Secondary Teachers (3,0) 3
Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of core subject matter to diverse learners. Includes integrated technology, laboratory and field experiences. Students use national and state
standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE442 Math Methods for Secondary Teachers (3,0) 3
Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of teaching mathematics to diverse secondary learners. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required.
 
TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers (3,0) 3
Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of teaching science to diverse learners. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment.
Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to teacher education program.
 
TE444 Social Studies Methods for Secondary Teachers (3,0) 3
Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of teaching social studies to diverse secondary learners. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and
admission to teacher education program.
 
TE445 Teaching Computer Science in the Secondary Classroom (3,0) 3
Techniques, materials and models for computer science teachers. Classroom and instructional management. Hardware and software evaluation and selection. Computer programming, including a team software development project. Web pages as an educational resource. Legal, ethical, social, economic and personal issues. Prerequisites: CS101 or CS103, CS201, TE150, TE250, TE301, and admission to the teacher education program.
 
TE446 Business Education Methods for Secondary Teachers (3,0) 3
A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective business course instruction. Students learn to plan and present office cluster, accounting, marketing and computer software lessons and units using contemporary methods.
Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Field work required. Prerequisites: TE150, TE250, TE301 and admission to the teacher
education program.
 
TE480 Internship in Teaching: Seminar (1,0) 1
A seminar course for students currently enrolled in the Internship in Teaching Diverse Learners I and ii to discuss issues in teacher education, classroom management, working with special needs students, and professional development.  This course may be repeated once for credit.  Corequisites: TE491 and TE492.
 
TE490 Research Topics in Education (1-4) 1-4
Individual study under supervision of teacher education faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisites: admission to the teacher education program, senior status and permission of instructor.
 
TE491 Internship in Teaching Diverse Learners I/Advanced Methods: [Subject] (8) 8
Directed and evaluated internship in heterogeneous  classrooms. Teaching worthwhile content to students with varied learning needs. Theoretical and field-based explorations of common teaching dilemmas. Student will spend
at least 25 clock hours weekly with a teacher in a school for field teaching experience. Prerequisites: successful completion of baccalaureate degree and all previous TE courses and field  experiences. Permission and availability of participating schools. Co-requisites: TE601 and TE602. May be repeated once.
 
TE492 Internship in Teaching Diverse Learners II/Advanced Methods: [Subject] (8) 8
Continuing internship in heterogeneous classrooms at selected schools. Increased emphasis on independent teaching. Maintaining classroom communities that ensure equitable access to important knowledge and skills.
Assessing academic and social outcomes. Student will spend at least 25 clock hours weekly with a teacher in a school for field teaching experience. Prerequisites: completion of TE491 and permission and availability of participating schools. Corequisites: TE603 and TE604. May be repeated once.
 
TE601 Professional Roles and Teaching Practices I (3,0) 3
Examination of pedagogical roles and practices in terms of teacher behaviors, learning communities, school, culture and society. Review and reform of ones own practice through use of identification of problems, data analysis
and strategic planning. Prerequisite: baccalaureate degree. Corequisites: TE602 and TE491 for students enrolled in the certification program.
 
TE602 Reflection and Inquiry in Teaching Practice I (3,0) 3
Qualitative and quantitative research methods on teaching and learning. Criteria for judging the validity and applicability of research-based knowledge. Framing educational problems worthy of inquiry. Designing and assessing
studies of teaching practice. Three class contact hours of lecture, discussion, clinical work. Prerequisite: TE402. Corequisites: TE491 and TE601. May be repeated once.
 
TE603 Professional Roles and Teaching Practices II (3,0) 3
A critical examination of the multi-dimensional aspects of teacher roles, pedagogical ethics, philosophical applications and influences on schools and learning communities. Corequisites: TE604 and TE492 for students enrolled in the certification program.
 
TE604 Reflection and Inquiry in Teaching Practice II (3,0) 3
Collecting, analyzing and interpreting data on teaching, learning and education policy — largely through action
research in the classroom. Dilemmas surrounding research on practice. Appraising and reporting results of inquiry.
Three class contact hours of lecture, discussion and clinical. Prerequisites: TE491, TE601 and TE602. Corequisites: TE492 and TE603. May be repeated once.
 
 
MATHEMATICS
Special topics courses will be available as needand interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these. Based on a series of exams each student isplaced in the beginning mathematics course judged most appropriate for successful completion and mathematical progress. For courses numbered 100 and above a student’s
curriculum major also affects course selection. Courses numbered below 100 do not count toward graduation.
MA112 Calculus for Business and Life Sciences (4,0) 4
Limits, differentiation, applications of the derivative, integration, application of the definite integral, techniques of integration. Calculus of exponential and logarithmic functions, elementary differential equations, functions of
several variables. Prerequisite: MA111 with a grade of C or better. This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.
 
MA140 Precalculus Mathematics (5,0) 5
Basic theory of functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Inequalities. Analytic geometry, plane trigonometry and vectors. Complex numbers. Systems of linear equations, matrices and
determinants. Prerequisites: two years of high school algebra and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam, or MA092 with a  grade of C or better, and one-half year of high school trigonometry or MA108 with a grade of C or better is strongly recommended. This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.
 
MA151 Calculus I (4,0) 4
Limits, continuity and inverse functions. Logarithmic and exponential functions. Differentiation and applications of the derivative. L’Hopital’s rule. Inverse trigonometric functions. Integration and the definite integral. Prerequisites: high school mathematics that includes two years of algebra, one year of plane geometry and one-half year of trigonometry and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam, or MA140 with a grade of C or better.
 
MA152 Calculus II (4,0) 4
Applications of the definite integral. Techniques of integration and improper integrals. Infinite series. Conic sections, polar coordinates and parametric equations. Prerequisite: MA151 with a grade of C or better.
 
MA207 Principles of Statistical Methods (3,0) 3
Descriptive statistics, probability distributions (including normal, binomial and chi-square), techniques of statistical inference including tests of hypotheses and selected nonparametric tests. (This course is a survey of elementary statistical concepts.) Prerequisite: MA086 or equivalent/ satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.
This course will not count toward a major in mathematics.
 
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Special topics courses will be available as needand interest develop. Consult the semester course schedule for these.
 
CS101 Introduction to Microcomputer Applications (2,2) 3
The study of a selection of contemporary microcomputer applications, including operating systems concepts, word processing, spreadsheets, database management systems, and the Internet and World Wide Web. Brief survey of
other applications, such as presentation graphics, multimedia usage and desktop publishing. Does not apply toward credit in computer science major or minor.
     
 
Lake Superior State University
650 W. Easterday Ave, Sault Ste. Marie, MI, 49783
Phone: 1-888-800-LSSU   Fax: 1-906-635-2111
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