Editing changes for the August 2006 resubmission.

Additional narrative provided in Standards:  1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.4, 1.3.6

  


Standards for the Preparation of Teachers

 

 

DI
Integrated Science

(Secondary)

 

 

 

 Adopted by the Michigan State Board of Education

August 8,2002


 

 

Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of Integrated Science (Secondary)

DI Endorsement

 

Preface

 

 

Development of the Proposal

 

Over the last several years, a referent group of professional educators developed a proposal to adopt standards for the preparation of integrated science teachers.  These standards align with standards developed by the National Science Teachers Association and the Michigan Curriculum Framework for science education. 

 

A secondary integrated science endorsement prepares candidates to teach integrated science, biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science at the secondary level in courses designed to meet the Michigan Curriculum Framework science standards.  The preparation of integrated science teachers includes courses of study in each of the three major categories of science identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework:  Life Sciences, Physical Science, and Earth/Space Science.  The Secondary Integrated Science Endorsement requires either a group major with a minimum of 36 semester hours distributed among the three major categories for a balance of credits across the areas, or a comprehensive group major with a minimum of 50 semester hours distributed among the three major categories with no additional minor area of study.  Candidates who apply for the DI endorsement (secondary) must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification integrated science test at the secondary level for their secondary certificate.

 

To provide information and gather feedback on the proposal, a copy was also forwarded to selected groups/organizations, all Michigan teacher preparation institutions, and a random sample of intermediate and local school districts for review and comment.  As presented in this document, the standards reflect the feedback received. 

 

State Board adoption of these standards typically leads to the creation of a new certification test for teachers prepared to teach secondary integrated science.  Test development for a new Michigan Test for Teacher Certification in secondary integrated science will be scheduled according to the recommendation of the Standing Technical Advisory Council. 

 

 

Approval of Programs

 

Teacher preparation institutions that wish to continue to offer programs to prepare secondary integrated science teachers are required to submit an application for program approval that demonstrates how the new standards are met throughout the proposed curriculum.  The programs must be re-approved to show compliance with the new standards.  Following initial approval, the teacher preparation programs will be reviewed every five years through the Periodic Review/Program Evaluation process.

 


Content Guidelines/Standards Matrix

College/University

Lake Superior State UniversitySault Sainte Marie, Michigan

Code

DI

 

Source of Guidelines/Standards

Michigan State Board of Education,
August 2002

Program/Subject Area

Integrated Science (Secondary)

 

A – Awareness

The integrated science teacher recognizes/recalls the existence of different aspects of integrated science and related teaching strategies.

 

B – Basic Understanding

The integrated science teacher articulates knowledge about integrated science and related instructional and assessment strategies.  The integrated science teacher demonstrates proficiency in using the knowledge at a fundamental level of competence acceptable for teaching.

 

C – Comprehensive Understanding

The integrated science teacher is able to apply broad, in-depth knowledge of the different aspects of integrated science in a variety of settings.  (This level is not intended to reflect mastery; all teachers are expected to be lifelong learners.)

 

An integrated science endorsement prepares a teacher to teach integrated science at the secondary level in courses designed to meet the Michigan Curriculum Framework science standards.  The preparation of integrated science teachers includes courses of study in each of the three major categories of science identified in the Michigan Curriculum Framework:  Life Sciences, Physical Science, and Earth/Space Science.  The Secondary Integrated Science Endorsement requires a group major with a minimum of 36 semester hours distributed among the three major categories for a balance of credits across the areas.  Candidates choosing a secondary integrated science course of study may elect a comprehensive group major earning 50 semester hours distributed among the three major categories with no additional minor area of study.  Candidates who apply for the DI Endorsement (secondary) must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification integrated science test at the secondary level for their secondary certificate.

 

 

DIRECTIONS:    List required courses on matrix and provide additional narrative to explain how standards are met.  If electives are included, they should be clearly indicated.  Adjust size of cells as needed. 



 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences Fulfill
the Standards for Secondary Programs

 

Standard/Guideline

36 Semester Hour Major

50 Semester Hour
Comprehensive Group Major

 

Submit a narrative that explains how this program:

 

 The Integrated Science major and minor described in this application are closely and appropriately aligned to the content standards and benchmarks defined by the State Board of Education for the preparation of science teachers.  The Michigan Curriculum Framework standards are used as the basis for instruction.  The interconnectedness of  science concepts is regularly reinforced through each of our courses.  In seeking relevant and interesting examples we often turn to applications of one science principle through examples in another.  Our secondary science methods course (TE443) is the capstone course in the preparation of science educators, and many of the key integrative and curriculum based standards find their place through this course.

A.

uses the Michigan Curriculum Framework K-12 Science Content Standards and Benchmarks as the critical foundation for teacher preparation, ensuring that secondary integrated science teachers have the content knowledge and the ability to teach this curriculum; and

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

B.

develops an understanding of the interconnectedness of all science, along with major unifying themes, and relates these understandings to the teaching of science; and

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

C.

prepares candidates to understand and teach biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science as integrated content.

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

 


 

 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences Fulfill
the Standards for Secondary Programs

No.

Standard/Guideline

Level of Proficiency

36 Semester Hour Major

50 Semester Hour
Comprehensive Group Major

 

The preparation of secondary integrated science teachers will enable them to:

 

 

1.0

understand and develop the major concepts and principles of biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics, which may include such topics as the following:

 

 

1.1

Cellular Function, including

 

 

 

The concepts of the organization of living systems are addressed in a sequence of courses. We begin in BL131 General Biology I with an in depth look at the structure and function of the cell, and DNA is examined as the mechanism of hereditary. Basic concepts of genetics are introduced and further explored in BL220 Genetics. Concepts of ecology and evolution are introduced in BL131 General Biology II and further developed with respect to adaptation to the environment in BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates. In General Ecology a systems view of population and community is explored.

The format of the General Biology lab sequence is an inquiry-based approach to learning. Students are taught some basic laboratory skills, but are then required to generate questions and design and conduct experiments to answer these questions. The projects require background research and presentation to the class. In the lecture, the implications of science are related to our daily lives.

1.1.1

cell theory

B

 

BL131 General Biology I is a detailed examination of cell theory, investigating how cells function and how are able to replicate themselves.

1.1.2

cell types

B

 

BL131 General Biology I examines prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types and looks at the similarities and differences.

1.1.3

cell structure and function

C

 

BL131 General Biology I explores the function of the various organelles of eukaryotic cells and contrasts this with prokaryotic cells.

1.1.4

protein synthesis

C

 

BL131 General Biology I pursues protein synthesis in the context of gene expression as well as with respect to the endomembrane system.

1.1.5

cell division (mitosis & meiosis)

C

 

BL131 General Biology I examines the cell cycle with respect to a cell’s ability to make copies of itself, what can go wrong, and how an organism makes gametes for sexual reproduction.

1.2

Organization of Living Things, including

 

 

 

1.2.1

life cycles (including sexual and asexual reproduction)

C

 

BL131 General Biology I

BL131 discusses meiosis from a cellular perspective. In discussing meiosis, we of course talk about the generalized life cycle of gametogenesis followed by syngamy followed by further mitosis and development (for multicellular organisms). We also discuss developmental biology at the end of the term. Specific life cycles of specific taxa are described in BIOL132, the organismal biology class.

1.2.2

living and non-living

C

 

BL131 General Biology I

BL131 begins with a discussion of the chemistry of life. We describe the evolution of early life and in this discussion, the distinction between living and non-living systems is made (and  students see that there really isn’t that good of a definition of ‘life’ – are viruses ‘living’? are organisms that are by all appearances inert but can start up again ‘alive’ during their inert state?

1.2.3

systems

C

 

BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates. Two weeks of lecture near the beginning of the semester are devoted to an overview of vertebrate systems.  The central focus of the course is a detailed comparison of the major organ systems as they have evolved in each of the vertebrate classes

1.2.4

classification

C

 

BL131 General Biology I AND BL132 General Biology II

Classification in BIOL131 is limited. The more full discussion of classification is in the BIOL 132, organismal biology class. But in BIOL131, we do discuss the distinctions between prokaryotes and eukaryotes (and, in the former, the(including the distinction between archaebacter and eubacter). From a cellular structure perspective, the distinction between bacterial, animal, fungal, and plant cells are discussed in detail.

1.2.5

growth and development (embryology, etc.)

B

 

BL131 General Biology I approaches growth and development while understanding gene expression. We examine cell cycle and the effects on growth and then investigate how gene expression affects cell differentiation during development.

1.2.6

photosynthesis

C

 

BL131 General Biology I  examines photosynthesis in the context of energy storage. In lab we also spend several weeks growing plants under a variety of conditions to investigate variation in rates of photosynthesis.

1.2.7

cellular respiration

C

 

BL131 General Biology I examines cellular respiration from  several angles. In lecture we cover the chemistry of ATP formation, then in lab we have several weeks of experiments looking at aerobic and anaerobic respiration as well as decomposition and human respiration

1.3

Concepts of Heredity, including

 

 

 

1.3.1

Mendelian genetics

C

 

BL220 Genetics. The concepts of heredity and propbability are explored in both lecture and lab. Drosophila are used as a model species.

1.3.2

traits passed from one generation to the next

C

 

BL220 Genetics

1.3.3

molecular genetics (structure of DNA)

C

 

BL220 Genetics. The structure of DNA is examined in detail with respect to DNA replication and transcription.

1.3.4

modern genetics (electrophoresis, genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting, etc.)

C

 

BL220 Genetics. In the lab, students have hands on experience with restriction digestions, gel electrophoresis, PCR and capillary electrophoresis.

1.3.5

population genetics

B

 

BL220Genetics. Basics of gene flow within and between populations are examined.

1.3.6

environmental effects on heredity

B

 

BL132 General Biology II AND BL131 General Biology I

Heredity should be listed as a BIOL131 topic. Genetics is a major unit of BL131. Heredity is not really covered specifically in BIOL132 apart from some aspects of evolution in terms of development of major taxa.

1.4

Evolutionary Change, including

 

 

 

1.4.1

diversity/speciation

B

 

BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates The scope of vertebrate diversity (both extinct and extant taxa) is explored.  The process of speciation is described, in a general way, as an adaptive response to environmental pressures via the accumulation of derived characteristics.

1.4.2

theory of evolution (adaptation, variation, and natural selection and relationships between species, including human)

C

 

BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates A survey of evolutionary theories is discussed, culminating in a step-by-step examination of Darwin’s theory of Natural Selection.  Throughout the course, morphological, behavioral, and physiological adaptations are described in terms of their adaptive significance

1.4.3

fossils/ancient life

B

 

BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates The vertebrate taxa are presented within a phylogenetic context.  The value of the fossil record is demonstrated by an exploration of extinct taxa and the synapomorphies they share with extant representatives of the vertebrates.

1.4.4

extinction

B

 

BL240 Natural History of the Vertebrates The concept of extinction is introduced as a natural outcome of the evolutionary process.  Theories regarding the process of extinction are described.  The impact of major extinction events on vertebrate evolution is also described.

1.5

Ecological Systems, including

 

 

 

1.5.1

community relationships, including predator/prey and symbiosis

C

 

BL337 General Ecology Community relationships including predator/prey and symbiosis. See syllabus detailed outline IV.F.2 and IV.G.

1.5.2

population

B

 

BL337 General Ecology Transfer of energy (food chains/webs). Refer to syllabus detailed outline VI.A

1.5.3

transfer of energy (food chains/webs)

C

 

BL337 General Ecology

1.5.4

biogeochemical cycles

C

 

BL337 General Ecology General Ecology Biogeochemical cycles. Refer to syllabus detailed outline VI.C.1-5

1.5.5

human impact

C

 

BL337 General Ecology  Human impact. Refer to syllabus detailed outline II.D, III.B, IV.J, V.F., VI.E., VII.E.3, VIII.

1.6

Human Biology, including

 

 

 

1.6.1

anatomy and physiology

B

 

BL122 Anatomy and Physiology II covers the structure and function of the endocrine cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, reproductive, digestive and immune systems.

1.6.2

disease and immunology

B

 

BL122 Anatomy and Physiology II investigates immune system function and the response to disease.

1.6.3

health habits

B

 

BL122 Anatomy and Physiology II examines nutrition and high risk behavior in the context of health.

1.6.4

resource management

C

 

BL337

1.6.5

human population growth and diversity

B

 

BL132

 

1.7

Earth/Space Science, including

 

 The major concepts of physical geology are taught through the full-year general physical and integrated historical geology course (GE 121-GE 122, 8 semester credits total) and its associated required laboratory (2 hours per week).  This course is the foundation for the program, serving as prerequisite for all courses above the 100 level.  Laboratory exercises provide opportunity for both confirmation and demonstration of concepts taught in lecture, as well as a vehicle for students to construct new knowledge and understandings.  Course syllabi and expanded course objectives identify the key concepts, laboratory activities and assessment elements.  This sequence of required courses in Earth/Space Science topics is identical to the selection of courses and topics used to address the Earth/Space Teaching Minor submitted under separate cover.

 

 

1.7.1

lithosphere and historical geology

C

 

GE 121 Physical Historical Geology I and

GE 122 Physical Historical Geology II (expand. object)

1.7.2

hydrosphere

C

 

NS 116 Oceanography

1.7.3

atmosphere, weather, climate

C

 

GG 108

108 labs

 Physical Geography: Meteorology and Climatology

1.7.4

astronomy

C

 

NS119

 Astronomy

1.8

Chemistry and Physics:

Major Concepts and Principles of Physics and Chemistry

 

 

 

1.8.1

Inorganic Chemistry, including

 The major concepts of inorganic chemistry are taught through the full-year general chemistry course ( CH115/116 - 9 semester credits) and its associated required laboratory (3 hours per week).  This course is the foundation for the program, serving as prerequisite for all courses above the 200 level.  Laboratory exercises provide opportunity for both confirmation and demonstration of concepts taught in lecture, as well as a vehicle for students to construct new knowledge and understandings.  Course syllabi and expanded course objectives identify the key concepts, laboratory activities and assessment elements.  Wherever possible the nationally standardized ACS examinations are used for the final course evaluation instrument.  Students have scored consistently at or above those national norms.  This selection of chemistry courses is identical to the Chemistry Teaching Minor submitted separately.  We believe these courses adequately address the content standards of the chemistry standard.

1.8.1.1

atomic/molecular structure and bonding

C

 

CH115 (objectives) General Chemistry I

1.8.1.2

stoichiometry

C

 

CH115 (objectives) General Chemistry I

1.8.1.3

gas laws

C

 

CH115 (objectives) General Chemistry I

1.8.1.4

states of matter

C

 

CH115 (objectives) General Chemistry I

1.8.1.5

equilibria

C

 

CH231 Quantitative Analysis

1.8.1.6

acid-bases

C

 

CH231Quantitative Analysis

1.8.1.7

electrochemistry

C

 

CH116 (objectives) General Chemistry II

1.8.1.8

nomenclature

C

 

CH115 (objectives) General Chemistry I

1.8.1.9

qualitative analysis

C

 

CH115 (objectives) General Chemistry I

1.8.2

Organic Chemistry, including

 

The concepts of organic chemistry are addressed for the major through a traditional one-year organic chemistry course (CH225/226).  For the minor, students may choose to complete a survey course covering both organic and biochemistry  (CH105).  In either case the students, through lecture and extensive laboratory experiences will demonstrate the requisite knowledge and skills addressed in each standard.

1.8.2.1

aliphatic and alicyclic reactions

A

 

CH105 Life Chemistry II

1.8.2.2

stereochemistry

A

 

CH105 Life Chemistry II

1.8.2.3

structure and nomenclature of major functional groups

C

 

CH105 H105 Life Chemistry II

1.8.2.4

aromatic compounds

B

 

CH105  Life Chemistry II

1.8.2.5

spectroscopy

B

 

CH332 Instrumental Analysis

1.8.2.6

heterocyclic compounds

A

 

CH105  Life Chemistry II

1.8.2.7

polymers

B

 

CH105 Life Chemistry II

1.8.2.8

biomolecules

B

 

CH105  Life Chemistry II

1.8.3

Physics, including

 

 The major concepts of physics are taught in this algebra based physics course.  Students are engaged in weekly laboratory experiences to reinforce the topics from lecture. Along with the chemistry courses identified below, the Physical Science program submitted separately requires these same physics courses.

1.8.3.1

mechanics

C

 

PH221 Elements of Physics I

1.8.3.2

electricity and magnetism

C

 

PH222 Elements of Physics II

1.8.3.3

thermodynamics

C

 

PH222 Elements of Physics II

1.8.3.4

waves, vibrations, and optics

C

 

PH222 Elements of Physics II

1.8.3.5

atomic and nuclear physics

B

 

PH222 Elements of Physics II


 

 

 

Narrative Explaining how Required Courses and/or Experiences Fulfill
the Standards for Secondary Programs

No.

Standard/Guideline

36 Semester Hour Major

50 Semester Hour
Comprehensive Group Major

 

The preparation of secondary integrated science teachers will enable them to:

 

Calculus level mathematics is a prerequisite for quantitative analysis (CH231).  Mathematics, and mathematical problem solving skills are used extensively throughout the curriculum, from stoichiometric and logarithmic problems in general chemistry, limiting reagent and percentage yield in organic, to the rigorous calculations needed in quantitative analysis.

 

TE443, Secondary Science Methods includes an advanced field placement requirement, direct instruction in issues related to classroom and laboratory instruction at the secondary level, and to demonstrating the essential skills, dispositions and knowledge of a pre-service secondary science teacher.   Through activities, demonstration lessons, field work in grade 7-12 classrooms and course assignments students provide evidence of their professional development and readiness to enter the classroom.  Evaluation standards for TE443, and the entire professional education sequence, are based on the ELSMT standards.  Assignments include aligning curriculum materials developed through the course to the Michigan Curriculum Framework.

 

2.0

apply mathematics, including statistics, to investigations in the sciences, including the analysis of data;

 

MA112 Calculus for Business and Life Sciences is a prerequisite to CH231Quantitative Analysis

3.0

relate the study of science to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues; in particular, relate the concepts of science to current controversies such as cloning, genetically-modified food, the use of energy, exploitation of resources, global changes, and medical research, as well as other issues;

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

4.0

locate appropriate resources, design and conduct inquiry-based open-ended scientific investigations, interpret findings, communicate results, and make judgments based on evidence;

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

5.0

construct new knowledge for themselves through research, reading and discussion, and reflect in an informed way on the role of science in human affairs;

 

TE443Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

6.0

understand and promote the maintenance of a safe science classroom as identified by the Council of State Science Supervisors, including the ethical and appropriate use and care for living organisms and scientific equipment, and the safe storage, use, and disposal of chemicals;

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

7.0

demonstrate competence in the practice of teaching as defined within the Entry-Level Standards for Michigan Teachers;

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

8.0

create and maintain an educational environment in which conceptual understanding will occur for all science students;

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

9.0

develop an understanding and appreciation for the nature of scientific inquiry; and

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

10.0

demonstrate competence in the practice of teaching through investigative experiences and by demonstrating the application of the scientific process and in assessing student learning through multiple processes.

 

TE443 Science Methods for Secondary Teachers