Lake Superior State University

Course Descriptions

Each course description is preceded by the following type of heading:

CHEM999 Chemistry
(3,3) 5

or

CHEM999 Chemistry
(3,3,1) 5

or

CHEM999 Chemistry
(3,3) alternate years 5

The first line provides the code number (CHEM999) and the course name; see abbreviation legend below. The second line includes several pieces of information: The first two numbers in parentheses are hours of lecture-lab per week.  If the course has a recitation  component, it will be listed next.  The far right digit indicates the number of credit hours. Sometimes, no semester will be indicated, or there may be an alternate years or “every third year” notation. Consult either the on-line course schedule listings prior to registration or your department chair concerning scheduling of such courses.

NOTE: Students must satisfy prerequisites and any other stated conditions before enrolling in a course, or have permission from the instructor to waive the prerequisites. Enrollment in a course may be revoked (with an N grade) if it is found during the regular add/drop period that the proper prerequisites have not been met. Responsibility rests with students to be certain that they have the approved prerequisites.

Abbreviations



ACTG132

Principles of Accounting I

(4,0) 4

An introduction to the principles and procedures of accounting as applied to proprietorships and corporations. Areas of study include the accounting, internal control and the asset, liability and equity sections of the balance sheet..

ACTG133

Principles of Accounting II

(4,0) 4

This course emphasizes the role of managerial accounting information within a firm. Topics include budgeting, responsibility accounting, cost allocations, cost behavior, decision models, product costing, cost control, performance evaluation, capital budgeting, cash flows and methods of financial analysis. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in ACTG132.

ACTG230

Fundamentals of Accounting

(4,) 4

This course is designed to give non-business majors an understanding of the accounting process and the knowledge to read, understand, and use financial statements and reports in making decisions. The emphasis is on the use, rather than the generation, of accounting information. This course is not open to business majors.

ACTG232

Intermediate Accounting I

(4,0) 4

A review of the general theoretical framework and process of accounting for use as a reference in an intensive study of accounting doctrines and procedures proposed by various authoritative groups. Topics: Generally accepted accounting principles; the accounting process; balance sheet; income statement; present value principles and application; cash and temporary investments; receivables; inventories, plant and intangible assets; and long term investments. Prerequisites: ACTG132 and 133.

ACTG233

Intermediate Accounting II

(4,0) 4

Continuation of AC232 with reference to accounting theory as applied to specific critical areas of financial data accumulation and presentation. Emphasis is placed on valuation concepts and their influence on contemporary practice. Topics: Liabilities; long term debt securities; owner's equity; earnings and revenue recognition; income taxes; leases; pensions; error correction; cash flows; and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACTG232.

ACTG332

Cost Management I

(4,0) 4

A study of contemporary production costing and cost management practices. Topics include job order and process costing systems, value chain management, activity based costing, activity based management, customer profitability, managing quality and time, cost allocations, joint process costing, and managing support service costs. Prerequisite: ACTG133.

ACTG333

Cost Management II

(4,0) 4

A continuation of AC332. Topics include cost estimation procedures and computer applications, financial and CVP models, cost management and decision making, strategic issues in capital investment decision, budgeting and financial planning, standard costing, traditional- and activity-based budgeting, performance evaluation, transfer pricing, and incentive systems for performance evaluation. Prerequisites: ACTG332 and DATA235.

ACTG334

Accounting Information Systems

(3,0) 3

Elements that constitute an accounting system and theories upon which a system should be designed. Emphasis upon computerized accounting systems with extensive use of computers. Prerequisites: ACTG233, ACTG332, introductory data processing course.

ACTG335

Accounting Systems Theory

(1,0) 1

This course is designed to provide the student with the theory of accounting information systems. Together with computerized accounting applications, this course will substitute for ACTG334, accounting information systems. This course is designed for use only at the Regional Centers, where ACTG334 may not be offered. Prerequisites: Computerized accounting applications course and spreadsheet course.

ACTG350

Income Tax Practicum

(0,3) 1

Field instruction and practical experience in federal and state income tax preparation. Prerequisite: ACTG421. Repeat up to two times for a maximum of 2 credits.

ACTG421

Federal Taxation Accounting I

(3,0) 3

Basic concepts of the theory and practice applicable to the preparation of individual tax returns. A comprehensive analysis of regulations governing inclusions and exclusions of income; capital gains and losses; and personal, standard, and itemized deductions. Prerequisites: ACTG133 and junior standing or approval of the department.

ACTG422

Federal Taxation Accounting II

(3,0) 3

Theory and practice of income tax accounting as applied to tax credits, partnerships, and corporations. Includes some library tax research. Prerequisite: ACTG421.

ACTG427

Auditing

(4,0) 4

A study of ethical, professional, and technical standards for independent audits and auditing procedures as they apply to internal controls. A study of audit program applications as they apply to elements of the financial statements. Prerequisites: ACTG233 and 333.

ACTG432

Advanced Accounting I: Consolidations

(4,0) 4

This course involves a study of corporate business combinations and the preparation of related consolidated financial statements. International accounting issues related to the hedging of foreign currency transactions, translation of foreign financial statements and the application/comparison of international accounting standards will also be presented. Prerequisite: ACTG233.

ACTG433

Advanced Accounting II: Governmental

(4,0) 4

An introduction to governmental and nonprofit accounting as applied to state and local governments and other nongovernmental not-for-profit entities including colleges and universities, and health care organizations. Areas of study include both the source of GASB standards and statements and the application of this theory to the governmental accounting cycle. Students will also be exposed to and apply a variety of financial performance measures unique to this sector of the economy. Students will prepare a monthly transaction analysis and complete a governmental practice set. Prerequisite: ACTG233.

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ARTS109

Principles of Design and Color

(3,0) 3

This course acquaints students with the various possibilities of working with two-dimensional design. Using graphite, marker, collage and basic print making/stamping techniques, participants will explore line, form, shape, texture, color and the use of negative and positive space. In addition to in-class assignments, participants will be required to research, complete and present a major piece in two-dimension at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: none. Equivalent to FINE151 + VISA1516 for BRIDGE.

ARTS110

Fundamentals of Drawing

(3,0) 3

This course will introduce the participant to basic drawing techniques, focusing upon the use of predominantly dry media such as graphite, charcoal, colored clays and chalks. Students will be required to work in-studio on a number of projects (still life, object drawings, texture, tone and line explorations), working toward the creation of a portfolio of drawings for final submission. Prerequisite: none. Equivalent to FINE150+ VISA1506 for BRIDGE.

ARTS111

Introduction to Painting Media and Techniques

(3,0) 3

The course focuses on painting as a process of self-expression. Participants will be introduced to the use of acrylics, watercolors and water-soluble oils. An introduction to Itten's color theories and basic compositional styles will help ground participants in their exploration of the media offered. Brush handling, mixed-media techniques, and the use of in-studio still-life arrangements will be highlighted. Prerequisite: ARTS109. Equivalent to FINE155 + VISA 2556 for BRIDGE.

ARTS211

Mixed Media Explorations

(3,0) 3

Students will be invited to work hands-on in an open studio environment, examining the development of their own visual language in relation to the media and methodologies presented. Participants will be invited to draw from personal experiences as well as from their environment as catalysts for art making. All will be encouraged to work with acrylics, watercolors, water-based oils, drawing media, photographs/laser copies, found materials, etc. At the end of the course, participants will be required to present a brief seminar with essay. Prerequisites: ARTS109. Equivalent to FINE178 + VISA2786 for BRIDGE.

ARTS212

Art for Elementary Teachers

(3, 0) 3

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the philosophy, theories and contemporary issues of art education in kindergarten through sixth grade. Various art media will be explored by the student, and curriculum planning and evaluation will be discussed.

ARTS250

Art History and Appreciation I

(4,0) 4

Study of arts exemplified in prehistoric and primitive cultures, and in the Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Aegean, Greek, Roman, early Christian, Byzantine, Moslem, Roman and Gothic eras. The course presents a development of historic, social and aesthetic principles, including a study of signs and symbols for students of art education, science, letters, business and engineering. Art history is taught in terms of visual experience and knowledge with art films, slides and demonstrations with art materials in addition to class lectures. Universal standards that can be applied to any work of art are studied. Counts as humanities credit for general education requirements.

ARTS251

Art History and Appreciation II

(4,0) 4

A study of European and American art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, including Renaissance, baroque, rococo, neoclassic, romantic, realist and contemporary. The history of art is presented from a technical, social and aesthetic standpoint, along with a study of rhythm, motion, and proportion. Works of art are considered on their own merits and development rather than on the basis of preconceptions. Art films, color slide presentations and demonstrations using art materials supplement class lectures. Counts as humanities credit for general education requirements.

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BIOL104

Survey of General Biology

(3,3) 4

This course is a non-majors biology course that will cover the major units of general biology: (1) cells and energy; (2) genetics; (3) evolution; (4) organismal biology; (5) ecology. Developing a solid understanding of the fundamentals of general biology is vital to being an informed citizen about advances in the medical and food sciences, foundational and new information about the organization of life, and current issues of environmental and ecological concern. Course content is tied to the State of Michigan's benchmarks for training elementary school teachers, but any students interested in the life sciences are encouraged to take this class. The laboratory is designed to illustrate the course content as well as illustrate the principles of inquiry. Prerequisites: ENGL091 and MATH086 or equivalent test scores.

BIOL105

Function of the Human Body

(3,2) 4

Survey of the functional anatomy and the related physiological processes needed for the understanding of normal human activity. Not open to biological majors or minors. Prerequisite: ENGL091 or equivalent.

BIOL107

Field Biology

(2,3) 3

Introduction to organisms and their environmental interactions and conservation concerns with emphasis on Eastern UP. Lab consists primarily of field experiences. Not open to biology majors. Prerequisite: ENGL091 or equivalent.

BIOL121

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

(3,3) 4

This is the first half of a two-course sequence. This course covers organization of the human body, basic principles of chemistry, the integumentary system, the skeletal and muscular systems, the nervous system and special senses. Laboratory experiences are designed to complement the lecture topics. This course may not be used as a general education natural science elective nor does this sequence apply toward a major or minor in biological science. Prerequisites: High school chemistry, ENGL091 or equivalent, and MATH086 or equivalent satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

BIOL122

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

(3,3) 4

The second half of the Human Anatomy and Physiology sequence emphasizes the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatics and the immune response, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system and the reproductive system. Laboratory experiences are coordinated with the lecture discussions. Prerequisite: BIOL121.

BIOL126

Interpretation of Maps and Aerial Photographs

(1,3) 2

Introduction to use and interpretation of 1:24,000 USGS topographic maps. Topics covered include: determination and calculation of scale, map coordinate systems, projections, and locating features using the General Land Office Survey System. Local landforms will be interpreted from aerial photography at a variety of scales and correlated with map interpretations. Land use and cover will be determined using both black and white and color infrared photography. Pre- or corequisite: MATH102 or higher.

BIOL131

General Biology: Cells

(3,3) 4

This course is an introduction to the cellular aspects of general biology. This course will provide an overview of cellular biology and serve as a framework for further biological studies. Topics to be covered include basic chemistry of the cell, function of cellular organelles, cellular metabolism including respiration and photosynthesis, the cell cycle, mitosis, meiosis, simple transmission genetics, introduction to molecular and developmental biology. The laboratory introduces the student to inquiry based scientific method. Prerequisites: MATH086, ENGL091, or equivalent scores on the math and English placement exams.

BIOL132

General Biology:Organisms

(3,3) 4

An introduction to the diversity of life, including the morphology, physiology, reproduction, general habitats and taxonomy of organisms. Adaptation to environment and modern concepts of evolution are stressed as unifying themes throughout the course. Prerequisites: MATH086, ENGL091, or equivalent scores on the math and English placement exams.

BIOL199

Freshman Seminar

(1,0) 1

Students meet in discipline-based, student-faculty groups in conjunction with BIOL299, BIOL399 and BIOL499. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Freshmen will assist with ongoing projects and will be guided by faculty and seniors enrolled in BIOL499 to generate and interpret data from these projects. Prerequisite: MATH102. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL131 or BIOL132.

BIOL202

Field Botany

(2,3) 3

A study of the common families, genera, and species, especially those in the local flora. Prerequisite: BIOL132

BIOL203

Fundamentals of Natural Resources

(3,0) 3

This course will introduce students to the history of natural resource conservation and management, career opportunities within the field of natural resources, and interaction between humans and the environment. The course will focus extensively on basic concepts in human dimensions as they apply to natural resource conservation and management. Course topics include assessing social attitudes and values, social conflicts and conflict resolution, legal and regulatory framework of natural resource management, and the role of stakeholder groups in conservation and management. Prerequisite: ENGL111. Pre- or corequisite: COMM101.

BIOL204

General Microbiology

(3,3) 4

This course will deal with the history and scope of microbiology, a study of microbial structure, growth, nutrition, metabolism, genetics, taxonomy and control. A study of mycoplasma, viruses and molds will be incorporated with genetic engineering and recombinant DNA. Labs will emphasize the identification and cultivation of molds and bacteria. Prerequisites: BIOL131 and CHEM115.

BIOL220

Genetics

(3,3) 4

This course covers the three major subdivisions of the study of genetics - Mendelian or transmission genetics, molecular biology, and population genetics. Transmission genetics topics will include traditional genetics problems and modes of inheritance; mitosis, meiosis and control of the cell cycle; chromosomal structure and recombination. Molecular topics will include information on DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation, gene cloning, genomics, and current research in DNA technology. Topics in population genetics will include aspects of the Hardy-Weinberg theory. The laboratory will include exercises in both traditional and molecular genetics. Prerequisites: BIOL131, CHEM116 and (BIOL250 or sophomore statistics course).

BIOL223

Clinical Microbiology

(3,0) 3

A basic course in microbiology dealing with the study of microorganisms and pathogens in humans. A survey of viruses, molds and bacteria. Their morphology and growth characteristics will be discussed along with the physical and chemical means to control pathogenic microorganisms causing human infections. Prerequisites: CHEM105 and BIOL122. Does not apply towards a major or minor in biology.

BIOL230

Introduction to Soil Science

(3,3) 4

A course dealing with the soil ecosystem as a natural resource and as an environmental medium. Beginning with factors involved in soil formation the course will survey soil physical, chemical, and organic properties and how they respond to disturbance. Soil reactions to wastes and wetland interactions will be discussed. Laboratories will focus on description of local soils and the use of soil survey information in making soil interpretations. Prerequisites: CHEM108 and CHEM109 or above; NSCI103 or BIOL132; BIOL126.

BIOL240

Natural History of the Vertebrates

(3,0) 3

A survey course covering the taxonomy, phylogeny and ecology of vertebrates with an emphasis on North American taxa. Prerequisite: BIOL107 or 132.

BIOL243

Vertebrate Anatomy

(3,3) 4

A detailed study of the origin, phylogeny and anatomy of the vertebrates. Laboratories emphasize the thorough dissection of representatives of at least three classes of vertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL132 and sophomore standing.

BIOL250

Quantitative Biology

(3,0) 3

This course will use quantitative methods to examine biological relationships and processes. Students will explore diverse biological topics including heat and energy balance, relative growth, photosynthesis, genetic drift, and diffusion using a variety of quantitative tools. Prerequisites: BIOL131, 132 and MATH111.

BIOL280

Biometrics

(2,2) 3

The application of inferential statistical methods to biological problems. The focus of the course is a systematic method for determining an appropriate statistical technique. Parametric and nonparametric procedures will be covered. Prerequisites: MATH207 and 111.

BIOL284

Principles of Forest Conservation

(2,4) 4

An introduction to forest structure, function, and ecology. Important fundamenTals of conservation biology such as the effects of disturbance, fragmentation, and biodiversity on forest ecosystems will be emphasized. Students will master identification of tree and shrub species of the Eastern Upper Peninsula and perform commonly used techniques to evaluate the forest resource. The lab portion of the course is in the field and proper dress is required. In addition, one all-day field trip will be scheduled. Prequisites: BIOL132 or NSCI103; and EVRN126.

BIOL285

Principles of Epidemiology

(3,0) 3

Principles, purpose and methods of descriptive and analytic epidemiology with emphasis on environmental health. Prerequisite: MATH207.

BIOL286

Principles of Watersheds

(3,0) 3

Overview of the geomorphology, hydrology and biota of various watersheds, with emphasis on hydrographic methods, sampling techniques, land use and management principles. Prerequisites: MATH111.

BIOL287

Conservation Biology

(3,0) 3

This course will provide a strong background in the field of conservation biology. The course will discuss patterns in, valuation of, and threats to biodiversity. The course will also examine tools and strategies for conserving biodiversity at the population and species levels and discuss the application of conservation biology in today's society. Specific topics include: (1) Principles of and issues in conservation; (2) Threats to biodiversity; (3) Methods and approaches to evaluate and mitigate threats; (4) Application of principles in the design of conservation reserves, restorations, and sustainable development. Prerequisites: BIOL131 and 132

BIOL289

Aquatic Research Sampling Methods

(2,3) 3

A variety of sampling techniques are introduced as they relate to the various disciplines of aquatic science. These methods include sampling and preservation of biotic (plankton, fish, bethic invertebrates, DNA, pathogens) and abiotic (water quality, sediments, climate) data. Prerequisites: BIOL107, CHEM108 and 109, MATH111 and permission of instructor. Also listed as EVRN289.

BIOL290

Independent Study in Biology

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in biology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of department and college dean. Prerequisites: Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no "I" grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the School of Natural Science.

BIOL299

Sophomore Seminar

(1,0) 1

Students meet in discipline-based, student-faculty groups in conjunction with BIOL199, 399 and 499. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Sophomores will assist with ongoing projects and will be guided by faculty and juniors enrolled in BIOL399 to conduct a comprehensive, annotated literature search in their area of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL199 and ENGL111.

BIOL302

Invertebrate Zoology

(2,3) 3

A study of the invertebrate groups with emphasis on morphology, phylogeny and life cycles. Prerequisite: BIOL132.

BIOL303

General Entomology

(2,3) 3

An introduction to the biology, ecology and systematics of the insects. This course covers fundamentals of insect taxonomy and physiology; and the varied roles insects play in the natural world and in human history and culture. Prerequisite: BIOL132.

BIOL310

Ichthyology

(2,3) 3

A study of the anatomy, physiology, behavior, taxonomy and natural history of fishes, with emphasis on freshwater species, particularly those in the Great Lakes region. Prerequisite: BIOL250.

BIOL311

Mammalogy

(2,3) 3

An investigation of the natural history, biology and taxonomy of mammals. Techniques for measuring and monitoring mammalian populations will be presented. The laboratory will focus on field techniques and the identification by skin, skull and track of mammals of the Great Lakes region. Prerequisite: BIOL243.

BIOL312

Ornithology

(2,4) 3

A study of the biology and taxonomy of birds. Labs will focus upon bird anatomy and bird recognition using video tapes and specimens. Prerequisite: BIOL132.

BIOL315

Plant Physiology

(3,3) 4

A study of the organization of plants, plant replication, photophysiology and photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, water transport in higher plants, plant growth substances, physiology of seeds, control of plant growth and plant cell tissue culture. Prerequisites: BIOL250 and CHEM116.

BIOL330

Animal Physiology

(3,3) 4

The course examines the many ways animal groups solve the problem of maintaining internal homeostasis. Neural control, endocrine systems, gas exchange, energy acquisition and temperature regulation are a few of the topics examined. The lab is closely tied to the lecture material using non-invasive live animal experiments, computer-interfaced data gathering and analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL250 and CHEM116.

BIOL332

Embryology

(2,2) 3 alternate years

A study of pattern formation and morphogenic processes in animals, with an emphasis on vertebrates. The laboratory portion of the course emphasizes descriptive ontogeny of representative vertebrates. Prerequisites: BIOL131 and BL132. (BL243 is highly recommended.)

BIOL333

Fish Ecology

(3,0) 3

A study of the relationship of fishes to their physical, chemical and biological environments in natural and perturbed aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on response and adaptation at the organism, population and community levels. Various types of aquatic ecosystems will be examined with respect to habitat accommodations of fish and the impact of human activities. Includes ecological principles as applied to important sport, commercial and forage fish species. Prerequisite: BIOL310.

BIOL335

Principles of Animal Nutrition

(3,0) 3 alternate years

A scientific approach to the nutritional role of water, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, minerals, and vitamins. The course will emphasize comparative aspects of gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology for livestock, wildlife, and fish. Prerequisites: BIOL250 AND CHEM116.

BIOL337

General Ecology

(2,3) 3

A survey of concepts of plant and animal autecology, population ecology and community ecology. Prerequisites: BIOL131, 132 and MATH111.

BIOL339

Wildlife Ecology

(3,0) 3

A quantitative analysis of the ecology and management of wildlife populations. Theories of population dynamics and distribution are presented. Community interactions including competition, predation, and herbivory, are explored in detail. Prerequisites: BIOL250, 280 and 337.

BIOL345

Limnology

(2,3) 3

An investigation of the principles of freshwater ecosystems with an emphasis on lakes. The physics and chemistry of natural systems are presented, as well as a survey of the dominant biota and their ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL250 and CHEM116.

BIOL372

Freshwater Fish Culture

(2,3) 3

Instruction in water quality monitoring, production systems, feeding and nutrition, disease identification and management, and reproduction principles of freshwater fishes used for recreational and commercial fisheries management, bait and food products. Students will learn propagation and rearing techniques for important fishes, particularly those with recreational or commercial value. Prerequisites: BIOL280 and 310.

BIOL380

Clinical Hematology and Hemostasis

(3,3) 4 alternate years

A study of the components of blood. Discussions of the formed elements to include normal and malignant states; anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, hemostasis (coagulation) processes and disease states. Laboratories will cover routine and automated blood component measurements. Offered evennumbered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CHEM226 and BIOL330.

BIOL399

Junior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Students meet in discipline-based, studentfaculty groups in conjunction with BIOL199, 299 and 499. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upper class students engaged in scholarly projects. Juniors will serve as mentors to sophomores in the group and will develop and present a proposal for a scholarly project. Prerequisites: BIOL280, 299 and COMM101.

BIOL405

Animal Behavior

(3,0) 3 alternate years

A course designed to examine the proximate mechanisms and the evolutionary development of animal behavior. Important concepts are explained by reference to illustrative studies. An appreciation of the methods and theoretical significance of current research is emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior standing and BIOL330 or 337. Offered even-numbered fall semesters.

BIOL420

Evolutionary Analysis

(3,0) 3

This course explores the fundamental mechanisms of evolutionary process and speciation, and illustrates the use of evolutionary analysis as a problem-solving tool. Issues of current interest in ecology, conservation, animal behavior, human medicine and a variety of other fields are addressed from the evolutionary perspective to explain biological phenomena and community interactions. Prerequisite: BIOL220 and 250.

BIOL421

Cell Biology

(3,3) 4

Cellular structure and function with emphasis on organelle ultrastructure, molecular organization of the cell, cell membranes and permeability, the cytoskeleton and cellular interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL220 and CHEM451.

BIOL422

Parasitology

(2,2) 3

A study of the morphology, taxonomy, habitats, pathology and life cycles of parasites. Prerequisites: BIOL131 and 132.

BIOL423

Immunology

(3,3) 4

A study of the basic elements of the immune response system and the various ways in which the immune system can fail, leading to immunopathological reactions. Labs will include current diagnostic methodologies. Prerequisites: BIOL131, 132, 204 and CHEM226.

BIOL425

Virology

(2,3) 3

The basic concepts of virology are discussed. Lab will cover some traditional virology methods but will emphasize recent molecular approaches to viral identification. Prerequisite: BIOL204 and BIOL220.

BIOL426

Ecology of Animal Disease

(3,0) 3

The course covers the population and environmental conditions that favor disease in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Basic concepts of infection through epidemics will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL337.

BIOL432

Fisheries Management

(2,3) 3

A course covering the history, theory and practice of fisheries management with an emphasis on basic strategies used in effective management of fish populations in freshwater ecosystems. Students will learn methods of collection and synthesis of data regarding fish population dynamics and manipulation, habitat modification, and human management to achieve specific fisheries management goals and objectives. Prerequisites: BIOL280, 333 and 345.

BIOL433

Histology

(2,3) 3 alternate years

A systems approach is used to study the microscopic anatomy of mammalian tissues and organs. Related physiological processes are integrated with the anatomical studies. Prerequisites: BIOL330.

BIOL434

Histopathology

(0,3) 1

The course is an intensive laboratory experience where students will learn to visually identify diseased tissue. They will also learn methods of sample preparation including sectioning and staining for microscopic identification of pathogens. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL433.

BIOL437

Plant Ecology

(2,3) 3

A study of the autecology, population ecology and community ecology of plants, including fundamental theory, field methods and data analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL202, BIOL337 and MATH207.

BIOL439

Wildlife Management

(2,3) 3

The application of ecological principles to develop practical wildlife management strategies to preserve, enhance or create viable wildlife habitats and populations. Students will have the opportunity to observe and practice standard field and laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL311 or BIOL312 and BIOL339.

BIOL450

Laboratory Apprenticeship

(0,3) per credit 1-2

Students will assist in laboratories, learning instructional techniques, under direction of faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Students must gain approval of the faculty member in charge of the specific laboratory, and the dean. Credits may be used as BIOL electives. This is a credit/no credit credit course.

BIOL455

Body Fluids Analysis

(3,2) 4

Covers molecular analytes that are measured in blood, urine, and body fluids: the physiologic and pathologic processes that affect the levels of these analytes, correlations of analyte levels with disease, methods and instruments used to measure them, and principles and practices of quality control. Prerequisites: MATH207, CHEM226, CHEM332, BIOL330.

BIOL460

Clinical Laboratory Science Internship

30(15 credits per sem

Practical and didactic training with certified laboratory personnel. Branch training is supplemented by informal lectures, oral quizzes and written examinations. Offered only at approved or affiliated hospital laboratories. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required college course work.

BIOL470

Restoration Ecology

(3,0) 3

This course will provide a broad overview of restoration of both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, including prairies, wetlands, lakes, and streams. Through lectures, field trips, and case study discussions, students will be introduced to ecological principles and techniques used to restore and rehabilitate ecosystems. Students also will be involved in identifying, designing, and evaluating local restoration projects in conjunction with local resource agencies. Prerequisite: BIOL337

BIOL475

Aquatic Entomology

(2,3) 3

Survey and identification of regional lake and stream insects, with additional emphasis on lifehistory strategies and community ecology. Insect physiology, ecology, behavior, importance as fish food organisms, and utility as indicators of water quality is also presented. Prerequisites: BIOL337 and junior standing.

BIOL480

Advanced Clinical Microbiology

(3,3) 4 alternate years

An advanced course in clinical microbiology concerning the role of bacteria, viruses, and fungi as the cause of various human infections. Standard modern clinical laboratory methodology will be covered. Offered oddnumbered spring semesters. Prerequisites: BL204 and CH226.

BIOL490

Independent Study in Biology

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in biology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of department and college dean. Prerequisites: Students must have junior or senior standing, have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no "I" grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

BIOL495

Senior Project

(0,6) 2

A practicum under the guidance of a faculty member. The student will conduct a scholarly project based on the proposal submitted by the student in BIOL399 (or a appropriate substitute). Prerequisite: BIOL399.

BIOL497

Experiential Learning Project

3 or 6

The Internship in Conservation Biology is a full semester/summer work experience. Interns will develop work goals, responsibilities, and outcomes with their agency supervisor and faculty mentor. Students will prepare formal communication components (workshop or oral presentation and a poster). The internship experience should be 12 weeks at 40 hours per week. Pre-requisite: INTD398

BIOL499

Senior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Students meet in discipline-based, studentfaculty groups in conjunction with BIOL199, 299 and 399. Weekly meetings will include discussion of literature relevant to the discipline and progress reports from upperclass students engaged in scholarly projects. Seniors will serve as mentors to freshmen in the group. Seniors will also produce a manuscript describing the results of their project and will be required to give poster and oral presentations to the University community. Prerequisite: BIOL495.

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BUSN121

Introduction to Business

(3,0) 3

This course is intended to provide students a broad overview of the complex and dynamic contemporary world of business. The course will illustrate how human resources management, marketing, production, and finance are major functions that work together to help owners, employees and customers reach their objectives. Business must operate within economic, social, natural, technological, international, legal, and political environments.

BUSN131

Hospitality and Service Management

(4,0) 4

An overview of the hospitality industry including the operation and trends in restaurant/food service management, lodging management and travel/tourism. Introduction to destinations and the following components of travel/tourism: modes of travel, tour management, associations, agencies, marketing and sales, career preparation and opportunities and travel publications.

BUSN211

Business Statistics

(3,0) 3

An introduction to business statistics. Topics include collection and presentation of data, measures of central tendency, variation and skewness, probability, probability distributions, Bayes's Theorem, sampling, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation. Prerequisite: MATH111.

BUSN226

Records Management

(3,0) 3

Study and application of records control, forms design, filing systems (manual and electronic), microforms, and the records cycle. A computer simulation is completed utilizing a program to print, sort, and select records as reports or labels.

BUSN231

Business Communications

(3,0) 3

Business and management communications problems. Direct, indirect, and persuasive letters; memos, short reports and directives. Some assignments must be typed. Extensive writing practice. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

BUSN261

Business Skills

(1,0) 1

A series of specific, business-skill classes. Each course will provide 15 classroom hours of instruction. A student may register for one or more sections per term, for a maximum of three credits earned in this course.

BUSN291

Students in Free Enterprise

(0,3) 1

Students work in teams to develop outreach programs. They learn by means of "real-world" experiences, then teach others how market economies and businesses operate. Corporate CEOs and senior executives judge these programs annually in regional competitions, and the winners of those contests then compete at the international exposition. Outreach program development enhances students' creative and communication skills by preparation of written and oral presentations. May be repeated for credit for a total of four credits.

BUSN299

Internship in [Discipline]

(4,0) 4

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to earn credit while obtaining meaningful discipline-related work experience outside the classroom setting. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 180 hours in an appropriate work setting. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA, sophomore standing, employer and instructor approval, and submission to, and approval by, departmental faculty of internship plan, including method of evaluation.

BUSN308

Managing Cultural Differences

(3,0) 3

Study of differing cultural norms that impact business decisions; designed for students interested in international and cross-cultural activities.

BUSN350

Business Law I

(3,0) 3

This portion of business law covers the law applicable to contracts, sales, personal property and bailments.

BUSN354

Legal and Financial Issues in Health Care Administration

(3,0) 3

This course is intended for students preparing for careers in management in health care fields or as health care practitioners. Students will be made aware of legal and financial issues and problems including fault liability; institutional liability; forms of organization; credentialing and appointments; staffing issues; consent and refusal of treatment; and health care financing. The student will be more aware of the need to seek professional counsel to minimize and prevent litigation. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Also listed as HLTH354.

BUSN355

Business Law II

(3,0) 3

This portion of business law covers the law applicable to commercial paper, corporations, partnerships, agency and employment.

BUSN399

Internship in [Discipline]

(4,0) 4

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to earn credit while obtaining meaningful discipline-related work experience outside the classroom setting. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 180 hours in an appropriate work setting. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA, junior standing, employer and instructor approval, and submission to, and approval by, departmental faculty of internship plan, including method of evaluation.

BUSN403

Business, Government and Society

(3,0) 3

This course examines the relationships of the business firm to government and to society. The course focuses on the economic, legal, political, social and ethical environment of business firms. Topics include consumer protection, environmental regulation, antitrust, constitutional and administrative law, alternative dispute resolution, and other topics of current concern. The business firm is examined in the context of market capitalism and the global economy. The course is structured to meet communication-intensive requirement of general education. Prerequisites: ECON202 and junior standing.

BUSN405

Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

(3,0) 3

Business ethics in organizations requires value-based leadership and purposeful actions that include planning and implementation of standards of appropriate conduct. This course will prepare students to be good corporate citizens through the study of business ethics, social responsibility, ethical decision making, corporate codes of ethical conduct, and how ethical behavior relates to organizational performance. Prerequisites: MGMT360 or MGMT365.

BUSN466

Business Policy

(3,0) 3

This course provides an opportunity for the student to develop an understanding of the interrelationship of the various divisions, departments and functions of a business organization from a top management perspective. Library research and case analysis are utilized. Prerequisites: Senior status and FINC341.

BUSN491

Research Reading in Business and Economics

(2-3,0) 2-3

Independent study and seminar; individual student guidance by faculty for selected research topics in business. Prerequisite: Senior status.

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CHEM091

Basic Chemistry

(2,0) 2

Thorough exposure to elementary chemistry designed to prepare students for college-level chemistry. Emphasis on drill to enhance problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: MATH084 or equivalent. Students must receive a C (2.0) or better in this course to qualify for CHEM104, 108 or 115. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation.

CHEM105

Applied Organic and Biochemistry

(3,2) 4

A continuation of concepts presented in CHEM108 with an emphasis on the fundamentals of organic and biochemistry. The interrelationships between the metabolic processes of living systems are discussed along with their underlying chemical reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM108 or equivalent, with a grade of C (2.00) or better.

CHEM108

Applied Chemistry

(3,0) 3

An introduction to selected principles of chemistry with emphasis on technological applications. Credit in this course does not apply toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisites: ENGL091 or equivalent and pre- or corequisite of MATH102.

CHEM109

Applied Chemistry Lab

(0,3) 1

Laboratory experience for CHEM108 Applied Chemistry (must complete both lecture and laboratory to qualify for general education credit). Corequisite: CHEM108.

CHEM115

General Chemistry I-Intro to Fundamental Principles of Chemistry

(4,2) 5

Fundamental principles of chemistry with emphasis on scientific method, basic chemical reactions and acid base equilibria, stoichiometry, periodic trends of elements, an introduction to the energy of reactions, atomic structure, simple bonding models, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry will be presented. Pre- or corequisite of MATH111 or higher with a grade of C (2.0) or better. ENGL091 or equivalent. One year of high school chemistry is strongly recommended.

CHEM116

General Chemistry II-Intro to Physical Chemistry

(4,3) 5

Continuation of CHEM115 with emphasis on physical chemical concepts such as bonding, gas laws, solids and solutions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium, including acid-base reactions and electron transfer processes. Prerequisite: CHEM115 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

CHEM225

Organic Chemistry I

(3,3) 4

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry, covering the structures, reactions and properties of aliphatic and alicyclic compounds. The course will introduce the study of organic nomenclature, functional group chemistry, stereochemistry, reactive intermediates, organic synthesis, reaction mechanisms and conjugated unsaturated systems. The laboratory introduces basic organic laboratory techniques and includes experiments in organic separations, synthesis, and analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM116 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

CHEM226

Organic Chemistry II

(3,3) 4

A continuation of CHEM225 covering the structures, properties and reactions of aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives, phenols, amines, organometallics, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins. The course will introduce the study of spectral methods of structure determination and expand the study of organic synthesis and mechanisms. The laboratory will include experiments in spectroscopy, organic synthesis and mechanisms, qualitative organic analysis, and instrumental analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM225 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

CHEM231

Quantitative Analysis

(3,3) 4

Evaluation of analytical data and study of gravimetric and titrimetric methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM116 with a grade of C (2.0) or better and MATH151 or MATH112.

CHEM251

Introductory Biochemistry

(3,3) 4

Introduction to the chemistry of biological molecules, including the general properties and chemical transformation of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and nucleic acids. Emphasis will be on correlating chemical reactions with biological function. An introduction to the intermediary metabolism of the carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids and nucleic acids will also be presented. Prequisites: CHEM116, CHEM225.

CHEM261

Inorganic Chemistry

(3,3) 4

This course will provide a foundation in Inorganic Chemistry with a focus on understanding the properties of the elements, bonding and geometries of small molecules and their chemical reactivities. Survey of main group and transition metal chemisty and applications to bio-inorganic chemistry. The laboratory component will provide students with opportunities to observe and measure the changes that accompany inorganic reactions and to make predictions regarding these inorganic reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM116 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM290

Independent Study in Chemistry

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in chemistry for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of school dean. Prerequisites: Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no I grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences office.

CHEM310

Applied Spectroscopy

(3,3) 4

General principles of spectroscopy will be explored including underlying principles and theory, data acquisition and processing coupled with spectral interpretation. Different spectroscopic methods used for the structural determination of organic molecules and in chemical research are described including mass spectrometery (MS), ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), infra-red spectroscopy (IR), atomic spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and both one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM226 and CHEM261. (Alternate Years)

CHEM332

Instrumental Analysis

(3,3) 4

Continuation of CHEM231. An instrumental analysis course involving the theory and use of spectrochemical, electroanalytical and separation methods for the characterization and determination of selected chemical substances. Prerequisite: CHEM231.

CHEM341

Environmental Chemistry I

(3,3) 4 alternate years

A study of the environmental chemistry of the hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere, the measurement and remediation of water and air quality problems, the toxicology of water and air pollutants, and the environmental aspects of energy use. Prerequisites: CHEM225 and CHEM226, CHEM231, and NSCI103. Also listed as EVRN341.

CHEM353

Introductory Toxicology

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An introduction to toxicology, including its history, types of poisons, their mode of operation and the biochemistry of detoxification. Environmental problems caused by toxic contaminants will be discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM225.

CHEM361

Physical Chemistry I

(4,0) 4 alternate years

Chemical thermodynamics with applications to both phase and chemical equilibria. Prerequisites: CHEM116, one year of calculus and one year of physics.

CHEM362

Physical Chemistry II

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Traditional quantum chemistry topics will be discussed that help explain chemical phenomena and provide descriptions and applications for spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM116 and either MATH112, EGNR140 or EGNR245; or one year of equivalent calculus and numerical methods. One year of college physics preferred.

CHEM363

Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics

(0,3) 1

An advanced laboratory exploring reaction kinetics and dynamics with an emphasis on modern methods of physical chemistry measurement. Prerequisite: CHEM116 and one semester of calculus.

CHEM395

Junior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Literature searching, scientific writing, and oral presentation of scientific data. Students will be expected to listen to presentation of peers enrolled in CHEM/EVRN499 and develop a topic for their senior thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Note: Also listed as EVRN395.

CHEM445

Forensic Science

(3,3) 4

This is a capstone class for the forensic chemistry degree. It will focus on standard and non-standard methods in forensic science. Lecture and laboratory concentrate on quantitative and qualitative drug analyses, fingerprint visualization techniques, ballistics, DNA analyses, and chemical analyses of evidence. Gas chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy techniques will be used to differentiate evidence. In this course much time will be spent on mechanisms of the analyses facilitating critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: CHEM332 and CJUS444. Note: Also listed as CJUS445.

CHEM450

Laboratory Apprenticeship

(0,3) per credit 1-2

Students will assist in laboratories, learning instructional techniques, under direction of faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Students must gain approval of the faculty member in charge of the specific laboratory, and the college dean. Credits may be used as CHEM electives.

CHEM452

Advanced Biochemical and Molecular Techniques

(2,4) 4 alternate years

A course covering advanced laboratory techniques for manipulating and analyzing bio-polymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. A brief discussion of bioinformatics will be presented. Protein expression vectors, PCR, and modern molecular techniques will be explored with potential applications for chemistry, biology, toxicology, forensic, and clinical lab science. Prerequisite: CHEM251.

CHEM461

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

(3,0) 3 alternate years

This is an every-other-year course. This course will meet for three hours per week. Advanced concepts of inorganic chemistry will be examined, including atomic structure, ionic and covalent substances, acids and bases, main group elements, and transition metal elements. Pre- or corequisites: CHEM226, 332 and 361.

CHEM462

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

(0,3) 1 alternate years

This is an every-other-year course. This laboratory will meet for three hours per week. Advanced concepts of inorganic chemistry will be examined in a laboratory setting.

CHEM490

Independent Study in Chemistry

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in chemistry for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of department chair. Prerequisites: Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no "I" grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences office.

CHEM495

Senior Project

(0,6) 2

This is a practicum course in which students, under the guidance of a faculty mentor, conduct a scholarly project mutually agreed upon by the student and his/her faculty mentor. This course will be required for a degree certified by the American Chemical Society. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM395 (also listed as EVRN395), CHEM231, and CHEM225. Dual listed as EVRN495.

CHEM499

Senior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Required for seniors majoring in chemistry/environmental science. Students will present the results of their scholarly research. Students who have completed CHEM/EVRN495 will be required to give poster and oral presentations to the University community as part of this class. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM395 (also listed as EVRN395). Dual listed as EVRN499.

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CHIN151

First-Year Chinese I

(4,0) 4

An introductory course designed to develop the four basic language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language as well as the acquisition of basic Chinese grammar and vocabulary. A communicative approach based on real-life situations. Relevant Chinese cultural aspects discussed. English used as necessary in classroom instruction.

CHIN152

First-Year Chinese II

(4,0) 4

Further development of basic language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing with a strong emphasis on speaking reading fluency. Relevant cultural aspects briefly discussed and the target language used progressively in instruction when it fits. Prerequisite: CHIN151 or equivalent.

CHIN251

Second-year Chinese I

(4,0) 4

An intermediate-level course aiming at expanding the learner's ability to communicate in everyday life situations in the target language. Continued focus on language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as further development of vocabulary knowledge and consolidation of grammatical knowledge. Social and cultural norms and conventions discussed when appropriate. Communicative approach used in instruction. Prerequisite: CHIN151, CHIN152 or equivalent.

CHIN252

Second-year Chinese II

(4,0) 4

An intermediate-level course aiming at expanding the learner's ability to communicate in everyday life situations in the target language. Continued focus on language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as further development of vocabulary knowledge and consolidation of grammatical knowledge. Social and cultural norms and conventions discussed when appropriate. Communicative approach used in instruction. Prerequisite: CHIN251 or equivalent.

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CHLD101

Foundations of Early Childhood Education

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the field of early childhood. Topics include its history, application of theories to curriculum, types of programs and issues in the field of child care. Observations of various early childhood settings will be required.

CHLD105

Child Guidance and Welfare

(3,0) 3

Through readings, discussions, observations and interactions with children, the student will learn how to develop guidance strategies when working with children in an early childhood setting. Prerequisite: PSYC155 or 265.

CHLD110

Curriculum Development and Teaching Practices

(3,0) 3

Developing curriculum and teaching practices based on the whole child's development: Cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and creative. Emphasis on planning play activities for learning centers. Observations of children in an early childhood setting will be required.

CHLD111

Infants and Toddlers:Developmentally Appropriate Practices

(3,0) 3

Includes theories of emotional, physical, social and cognitive stages of development of children ages 0 to 36 months. The knowledge of these stages will be applied to matching developmentally appropriate teaching and caregiving practices. Issues in administering infant/toddler programs will also be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC155 or 265.

CHLD220

Early Childhood Literature

(3,0) 3

Readings in developmentally appropriate literature and related activities across the curriculum for young children, ages birth through kindergarten. Prerequisites: ENGL110 and COMM101.

CHLD260

Practicum I

(1,12) 4 credit/no credit

The student will complete 12.5 hours weekly in an early childhood laboratory setting. Attendance at a weekly seminar is also required. Prerequisites: CHLD101 and 110 and permission of instructor.

CHLD261

Practicum II

(1,12) 4 credit/no credit

The student will complete 12.5 hours weekly in an early childhood laboratory setting. Attendance at a weekly seminar is also required. Prerequisites: CHLD101 and 110 and permission of instructor.

CHLD270

Administration of Early Childhood Programs

(3,0) 3

Knowledge of financial, legal, supervisory and administrative procedures used in operating an early childhood program will be gained through lectures, discussions, readings and activities. Prerequisite: CHLD260 or 261.

CHLD340

Practicum III: Field Experiences

(1,12) 4

Students will gain hands-on experience and observational skills in a K-3 classroom. Students will attend individualized seminars, and complete 100 contact hours in the classroom with additional course requirements. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and completion of CHLD260 and 261.

CHLD420

Emergent Literacy

(3,0) 3

A methods class which facilitates understanding of the reading, writing, oral and listening development of the child from preschool to early elementary. Prerequisite: CHLD220 or ENGL335.

CHLD430

Directed Studies in Early Childhood Education

(4,0) 4

Individual research study of a relevant topic of current trends and issues in early childhood. Topic will be defined jointly by student and instructor. Prerequisite: junior status.

CHLD450

Internship in Teaching: Infant-Toddler/Preprimary Education

4 credit/no credit

Directed and evaluated internship in an approved infant-toddler or preprimary classroom setting. Students must plan for a full-time (as determined by the program) student teaching experience for a total of 180 contact hours. Open only to elementary education students who are completing the early childhood endorsement (ZA) as required by the State of Michigan Department of Education. Prerequisites: completion of CHLD260 and/or ED261, and entrance into the Teacher Education Program. The student must meet all the require-ments as determined by the internship site. Instructor's permission is required and placement will be made with the instructor's approval.

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CJUS101

Introduction to Criminal Justice

(3,0) 3

A survey of the evolution of criminal justice with particular emphasis on the development of western models of justice. Included will be the role of law enforcement, corrections, the courts and loss control.

CJUS102

Police Process

(3,0) 3

Basic principles and techniques of administration which apply to criminal justice organizations. Emphasis on decision making, authority, human relations and communication within organizations.

CJUS103

Introduction to Terrorism and Homeland Security

(3,0) 3

This course will provide learners with historical view of terrorism, its orgins, methodology, and ideology. It will also provide the learner with knowledge of specific events of the 20th century related to terrorism that have formed modern terrorism. Finally it will discuss the worldwide effort on deterring and discovering terrorist activites.

CJUS110

Introduction to Corrections

(3,0) 3

History and philosophy of correctional policy and need for correctional reform; correctional system from arrest through sentencing; correctional personnel and clients.

CJUS130

Client Relations in Corrections

(3,0) 3

Meaning and functions of culture and discrimination, minorities in Michigan, affirmative action and attitude formation; ethics, values and professional responsiveness.

CJUS140

Correctional Client Growth and Development

(3,0) 3

Emphasis on needs, identities and development of recipients of correctional services; to assist students in gaining insights into development of sensitivity to behavior and motivations of corrections clients. Specific problems of prisoners and intervention strategies are reviewed.

CJUS197

Physical Fitness for Public Safety

(0,3) 1

This course provides physical fitness and skills necessary for the law enforcement and fire science certification students. Law enforcement students (MCOLES) take course both semesters of their senior year.

CJUS201

Firearms Training

(0,2) 1

Emphasis on safe weapon handling, the fundamentals of good marksmanship, proper methods of cleaning and weapon nomenclature. A variety of weapons will be used. Students will have to provide their own targets and ammunition. Prerequisite: Criminal justice student, sophomore standing or permission of department chair.

CJUS202

Canadian Criminal Law

(3,0) 3

Survey of Canadian substantive and procedural criminal law including search and seizure, arrest, evidence and statutory and case law.

CJUS203

Cyberterrorism

(3,0) 3

This course will examine the problem of both domestic and global Cyberterrorism/Cybercrimes. The recognition of various types of crimes committed using computers, the Internet, and other Electronic Devices. Learners will learn investigative techniques and legal issues as related to the investigation of Cybercrimes.

CJUS204

Domestic and International Terrorism

(3,0) 3

This course will examine the history and modern trends of Domestic, International and Transnational Terrorism. This will include the profile of terrorist recruits, the structure and dynamics of terrorist organizations, and government sponsored terrorism. The motivation of various organizations and their methods of terrorist violence, as well as, their justification of violent acts will be discussed. Antiterrorism and Counterterrorism measures will be analyzed.

CJUS206

Law Enforcement/Loss Control Internship

(3,0) 3

Field experience for correlation of theoretical knowledge with practice in participating law enforcement or loss control agencies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or sophomore standing. Course may be elected twice for credit of six hours.

CJUS212

Loss Control

(3,0) 3

Study of security, including historical, legal and philosophical framework for various phases of security operations in our society today.

CJUS220

Institutional Corrections

(3,0) 3

A survey of the history and philosophy of correctional institutions focusing on: The use of imprisonment as a mechanism of social control, custody versus treatment, rights of prisoners, prison and jail management, institutional training programs, examination of contemporary correctional institutions, prison and jail architecture, and prisoner society.

CJUS240

Community-Based Corrections

(3,0) 3

A survey of the history, development, techniques and fundamentals of non-institutional correctional programs and services. Emphasis will be placed on the necessity of correctional programs to interact with other human service agencies within the community.

CJUS243

Investigation

(3,0) 3

Introduction to investigation and the techniques of forensic science with emphasis upon gathering and documenting information for determination of fact. Prerequisite: CJUS101.

CJUS250

Correctional Law

(3,0) 3

Survey of substantive and procedural correctional law including sentencing, probation, parole, imprisonment, fines and restitution, and prisoners rights. Case law method used, based on appellate court decisions which evolve from criminal defendant litigation and complex legal issues concerning American corrections.

CJUS303

Critical Infrastructure Protection

(3,0) 3

This course will examine the historical development of the United States modern infrastructures. The course will provide an in depth knowledge of the Critical Infrastructures and the current protection methods. The learner will then learn advanced protection techniques and vulnerability analysis skills utilized to protect the assets.

CJUS306

Security Systems

(3,0) 3

Overview of specialized areas of security in specific facilities with special attention given to management of security information. Prerequisite: CJUS212.

CJUS313

Crisis Intervention and Deviant Behavior

(3,0) 3

Survey of philosophy, theory and practice involved in the treatment of different crisis situations most commonly confronting the law enforcement officer in the performance of regular duties. Prerequisites: CJUS101 and CJUS102.

CJUS319

Substantive Criminal Law

(3,0) 3

Survey of substantive criminal law as a means of attaining socially desirable ends including protection of life and property. Deals with historical, philosophical concepts as well as case law. Prerequisite: CJUS101.

CJUS321

Ethical Issues in Public Safety

(3,0) 3

Consideration of selected issues in public safety organizations. Emphasis on the role of practitioners and relations with the various publics. Students will be given moral dilemmas and will consider their individual value system. Prerequisites: CJUS101 and CJUS102.

CJUS325

Homeland Security and Emergency Services

(3,0) 3

This course will prepare all graduates from a variety of majors to understand how homeland security impacts the US political system as a whole, but especially from the standpoint of emergency response and preparedness. Investigates the impact of the federal homeland security apparatus on emergency response organizations at the state and local level. Includes a historical review of \"homeland security\" measures beginning in WWI and through WWII and the Korean War. Especially reviews the security situation during the Cold War. The course deals with the federal agencies usually not associated with homeland security, such as DEA, ATF, the military departments, FAA, CDC, the National Guard Bureau, and the DOD. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Students from other majors are encouraged to enroll with permission from instructor. Also listed as FIRE325.

CJUS330

Correctional Casework

(3,0) 3

The history, standards and principles of correctional casework are presented; the roles, functions and goals of casework are discussed; the competencies and training required for effective casework are considered; and correctional clients - probation and parole selection and appraisal - are concentrated upon. Prerequisites: CJUS220, CJUS240, and junior or senior standing.

CJUS341

Fire Cause and Arson Investigation

(3,0) 3

Determination of fire cause and origin and explosion causes. Prevention, documentation and legal aspects examined. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

CJUS345

Statistics and Design for Public Safety

(3,2) 4

Introduction to research methodology and designs utilized in public safety. Includes sampling, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, sources of error in presenting findings, and preparing and reading research reports. Prerequisites: Junior standing in criminal justice or fire science and MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

CJUS355

Juvenile Justice

(3,0) 3

Criminological theories of the causes of juvenile delinquency and prevention strategies. The functions of the juvenile justice system including: Police, courts, detention and legal rights. The Canadian Young Offenders Act will also be studied. Prerequisites: CJUS101 and SOCY214.

CJUS384

International and Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

(3,0) 3

A survey of selected world criminal justice systems including police, courts, and corrections. Cross-national and cross-cultural criminality from several perspectives will be examined as will the globalization of crime.

CJUS401

Senior Seminar

(3,0) 3

Seminar and independent study course with individual student guidance by faculty on selected research topics in criminal justice. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CJUS402

Criminal Justice Internship

3-9

Criminal justice internship with an agency. Credit is based on 34 hours of field work per credit hour. Students must make application by the ninth week of the previous semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor.

CJUS406

Advanced Canadian Jurisprudence

(3,0) 3

Expands upon the material covered in CJUS202, Canadian criminal law, including trial tactics and procedures, sentencing, jurors, invasion of privacy and other current topics. Prerequisite: CJUS202.

CJUS409

Procedural Criminal Law

(3,0) 3

Principles, duties and mechanics of criminal procedures as applied to important areas of arrest, search and seizure. Prerequisite: CJUS319.

CJUS411

Police Operations

(5,0) 5

A capstone course for Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards (MCOLES) Criminal Justice certification students. Court functions, domestic violence law and procedures, ethical issues, civil disputes, interpersonal relations, juvenile offenders and other related topics. Cannot receive credit for CJUS313 and CJUS411. Prerequisites: Senior criminal justice MCOLES student.

CJUS425

Women and Criminal Justice

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An examination of theories of female criminality and the treatment of women in criminal justice. Various issues relating to women as professionals in criminal justice will be covered. The unique issues which arise when females are incarcerated will also be examined. Prerequisites: CJUS101, and junior or senior standing.

CJUS444

Criminalistics

(3,3) 4

Criminalistic methodology and practice including crime scene techniques for specific offenses, collection and preservation of evidence, narcotics and dangerous drugs, fingerprinting, presentations, and other related topics. Contains MLEOTC mandated hours. Prerequisite: CJUS243.

CJUS445

Forensic Science

(3,3) 4

This is a capstone class for the forensic chemistry degree. It will focus on standard and non-standard methods in forensic science. Lecture and laboratory concentrate on quantitative and qualitative drug analyses, fingerprint visualization techniques, ballistics, DNA analyses, and chemical analyses of evidence. Gas chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy techniques will be used to differentiate evidence. In this course much time will be spent on mechanisms of the analyses facilitating critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: CHEM332 and CJUS444. Also listed as CHEM445.

CJUS484

Futures Research: Long-Range Planning for Criminal Justice

(3,0) 3 alternate years

This course will explore probable and possible futures and the impact on crime, criminality and the criminal justice system. It will explore alternative methods and systems to deal with projected change. Prerequisites: CJUS101 and CJUS102.

CJUS490

Independent Study for Criminal Justice

(1-4) 1-4

This may take the form of either a research project or a directed reading on a specific subject. One to four credits over a period of one or more semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student\'s project. May be repeated up to six credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

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COMM101

Fundamentals of Speech Communication

(3,0) 3

A study of communication theory as it relates to the oral sender and receiver in interpersonal, dyadic, small group, and public speaking situations. Application will be in perceptual analysis, dyadic encounters, small group problem-solving and discussion, and public speaking situations.

COMM201

Small Group Communication

(3,0) 3

Analysis of verbal communication in small groups as related to information processing, problem solving, agenda establishment, decision making and policy formation. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM210

Business and Professional Speaking

(3,0) 3

An introduction to basic skills, principles and contexts of communication in business and professional settings. Application will be in presentational, team-building and interviewing skills. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM211

Advanced Public Speaking

(3,0) 3

A grounding in upper-level public address with an emphasis on both informative and persuasive strategies. It will be taught using a combination of lecture, discussion, video analysis and critiques, and speeches. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM225

Interpersonal Communication

(3,0) 3

An introduction to interpersonal communication theory, with a focus on improved understanding of relationships and an improved ability to communicate more effectively with a variety of people. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM280

Understanding the Mass Media

(3,0) 3

Acquaints students with the basic similarities and differences in newswriting among the mass media, particularly newspapers, radio and television. Students will practice writing in the various formats. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

COMM302

Argumentation and Advocacy

(3,0) 3

Provides a practical grounding in the methods of public debate. Students are familiarized with theoretical frameworks for testing propositions through direct clash of evidence and arguments. The emphasis is on practical experience gained through experiences in oral argument. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM307

Classical/Contemporary Rhetoric

(3,0) 3

A study of the development of rhetoric beginning with the Greeks and continuing to the present. An emphasis will be placed on the influences of past rhetoric to current theory. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM308

Communication Theory

(3,0) 3

A study of the sources, dimensions and applications of contemporary communication theory, including the impact of mass communication in modern society. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM320

Public Relations

(4,0) 4

Public relations theory and practice will form the two emphases of the course. Theory will be explored and discussed as foundation for the application of public relations concepts and strategies. Students will be responsible for working with organizations in order to develop realistic PR campaigns which reflect the awareness of the significant structures and responsibilities involved in a professional approach to public relations. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM325

Organizational Communication

(3,0) 3

Focus on oral communication as it impacts on and permits coordination among people and thus allows for organized behavior. Focus on business and organizational contexts for interpersonal transactions. Participant involvement in simulation designed to generate insights into the elements involved in coordinated and competitive organizational communication. Selected topics for theory and practice: Interpersonal transactions, communication rules, conflict management, negotiations, trust, power and influence. Prerequisite: COMM101.

COMM416

Communication in Leadership

(3,0) 3

An advanced application of theory from the speech communication field to issues in organizational leadership. Leadership theory is surveyed from the speech communication perspective, with an eye toward building applicable skills. Particular emphasis is laid upon cultivating the ability to continue the process following the conclusion of the course. Prerequisite: COMM101.

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CSCI101

Introduction to Microcomputer Applications

(2,2) 3

The study of a selection of contemporary microcomputer applications, including operating systems concepts, word processing, spreadsheets, database management systems, and the Internet and World Wide Web. Brief survey of other applications, such as presentation graphics, multimedia usage and desktop publishing. Does not apply toward credit in computer science major or minor.

CSCI103

Survey of Computer Science

(2,2) 3

An introduction to the field of computer science for computer science majors. Microcomputer applications, history of computing, computer networks and the Internet, programming, hardware, theory of computation, artificial intelligence.

CSCI105

Introduction to Computer Programming

(2,2) 3

An introductory course in computer programming in a graphical development environment, intended for stuents with no prior computer programming experience. Arithmetic, control structures and simple data structures. Sound, graphics and animation. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on the ACT or Placement Exam.

CSCI106

Web Page Design and Development

(2,2) 3

Topics include planning a web site starting with domain name registration and selection of hosting service providers, creating web page using HTML/XHTML and cascading styles sheets; validating web pages; using web authoring tools such as Dreamweaver; publishing web pages to a remote web server, introductory web site design, including best practices for inserting graphics, page layout, building the web site navigation and user interface, integration of third-party and Web 2.0 tools and software, implementing web and accessibility standards, ethical and legal issues such as copyright and trademarks.

CSCI107

Web Graphic Design and Development

(2,2) 3

Apply graphic design, typography, color theory, and image composition to enhance a web site. Create web graphics using Adobe Photoshop and Microsoft Expression Design. Insert graphics into web pages and publish web sites using Adobe Dreamweaver and Microsoft Expresssion Web.

CSCI121

Principles of Programming

(3,0) 3

A broad-based introduction to computer programming, using the C++ programming language and basic operating system features as vehicles. Basic programming principles, including built-in and programmer-defined data, operators, functions and control structures. Applications will be drawn from across the discipline of computer science. Prerequisite: CSCI105 and MATH102 (or equivalent math placement), with a grade of C or better in both classes.

CSCI122

Programming Tools and Techniques

(3,0) 3

A continuation of CSCI121, with an emphasis on software development, rather than the syntactic and semantic details of C++ language. Advanced class concepts, including operator overloading, dynamic memory allocation, and inheritance. Exception handling, binary files, data representation, and advanced pointer applications. Text management, parsing techniques, and C-style input and output. Separate compilation and third-party libraries. Prerequisite: CSCI121 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI163

Troubleshooting and Repair of Personal Computers

(2,2) 3

A basic introduction to the architecture, installation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of personal computers. The student will learn elementary principles of electronics, magnetism and interference as they relate to computer repair and operation. The disassembly and upgrading of a personal computer will be covered in the laboratory as well as the use of diagnostic hardware and software.

CSCI201

Data Structures and Algorithms

(3,0) 3

An introductory course in data structures and algorithms, with an emphasis on abstraction, implementation and analysis. Pointers, lists, stacks, queues, trees and binary trees, and graphs. Application of various data structures to problems selected from the spectrum of computer science topics. Prerequisite: CSCI122 with a grade of C or better and either MATH111 or 140 (or equivalent math placement) with a grade of C or better.

CSCI207

Developing Multimedia and Rich Interactive Web Sites

(2,2) 3

Transform static web pages into rich media-based interactive web applications. Apply graphic design and marketing principles to design and produce audio and video components for both consumers and commercial web applications. Using Adobe Flash and Microsoft Silverlight, build rich interactive web applications. Publish web sites to a web server. Prerequisite: CSCI107 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI211

Database Applications

(3,0) 3

An introductory course in database design and implementation, using microcomputer-based relational database software. Single and multi-table databases, forms and reports, query processing, data import and export, and database-related programming. Prerequisite: CSCI105 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI221

Computer Networks

(2,2) 3

An introduction to the basic principles of computer networks and communication, exploring both the hardware necessary to support computer networks and the software needed to utilize those networks. Basic network topologies, network protocols, and local and wide-area networks. Prerequisites: CSCI103 and 105 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI223

Routers and Switches I

(2,2) 3 alternate years

Principles of Wide Area Networks, IQs, routers, routing protocols and configurations; hands-on training with industry-standard routing and switching equipment. Prerequisite: CSCI221 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI225

Routers and Switches II

(2,2) 3 alternate years

Routing protocols, virtual LANs, network management, design of LANs and WANs. Students completing this course will be prepared to take the CCNA certification exam. Prerequisite: CSCI223 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI248

Network Operating Systems I

(2,2) 3

An introduction to using and administering network operating systems. Students will also be introduced to virtualization of machines, as well as interaction between virtualized machines. Topics include: account setup, basic security, file and device sharing, and maintenance. Course topics will be presented in the context of different network operating systems. Prerequisite: CSCI221 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI263

Managing Computer Security

(3,0) 3

This course investigates the various security protection and recovery techniques available for networks and personal computers including security policies, procedures, and requirements necessary for protecting the integrity of information stored on networks, workstations, and other computer systems. Other topics include discussions on disaster recovery planning, emergency response teams, threat assessment, detection and remediation of a threat, standards for establishing a security framework, and operations security and production controls. Prerequisite: CSCI101 or 103 with a grade of C or better

CSCI271

Network Hardware and Software

(2,2) 3

An introduction to network management strategies, network security systems, and network installation and maintenance. Topics on linked users to the Internet and e-mail are also included. Prerequisites: CSCI101 or 103, and 105, both with a grade of C or better.

CSCI275

Web Server Administration

(2,2) 3

Install and configure a web server; identify the web server administrator role; monitor web server performance and log files; configure file transfer and email services; secure the server. Plan and configure an e-commerce web site. Prerequisites: CSCI221 and CSCI248, both with a C or better.

CSCI281

Introduction to UNIX and Networking

(2,2) 3

An introduction to the UNIX operating system, shell scripting, and UNIX networking from the user's perspective. Topics include basic and intermediate UNIX commands and file structure, regular expressions, BASH/CSH shell scripting, basic UNIX network setup, introduction to UNIX system daemons and networking services. Prerequisite: CSCI221 or 271 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI290

Independent Study in Computer Science

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in computer science for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the department head. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher.

CSCI291

Computer Science Project

(4,0) 4

This is a hands-on course where the student is assigned a project at a corporate site. The student is expected to spend at least 8-10 hours a week on the project. Topics for the project may include creating a substantial Web site, designing and implementing an application system for a user, modifying and updating an existing software system, or other related projects. The projects will vary each semester. Prerequisites: CSCI211 with a grade of C or better; CSCI201 with a grade of C or better, or current enrollment in CSCI201.

CSCI292

Computer Networking Project

(4,0) 4

This is a hands-on course where the student is assigned a project in a corporate network setting. The projects will vary each semester to allow students to implement their knowledge to create and maintain a real-world network system. Activities could include the wiring of the network, installing and maintaining users, installing and repairing workstations, maintaining a Novell or Microsoft network, monitoring an NDS tree, and other similar activities. The student is expected to spend at least 8-10 hours per week on the project including hours on site, doing research, and writing weekly report logs. Prerequisite: CSCI106 and 107, both with a grade of C or better, or CSCI163 and CSCI221, both with a grade of C or better.

CSCI303

Network Operating Systems I

(2,2) 3 alternate years

Installation, configuration and troubleshooting of network operating systems server software; hardware devices and drivers; system performance, reliability and availability; storage use and security. Prerequisite: CSCI202 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI305

Network Operating Systems II

(2,2) 3 alternate years

Installation, configuration and troubleshooting of network operating systems client software; managing file systems and storage; network protocols, remote access, printing and disaster recovery. Prerequisite: CSCI303 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI312

File and Database Management

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An introduction to files and file processing, with an emphasis on non-sequential organizations for supporting multi-file databases. Creating interfaces to database systems from common programming language platforms. Prerequisites: CSCI121 and CSCI211, each with a minimum grade of C.

CSCI313

Distributed Database Systems

(3,0) 3 on demand

This course is a study of distributed database systems and client-server applications. Topics include local and central site access, homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, transparencies, distributed query processing, SQL servers, transaction processing, concurrency, data allocation, analysis of failures, performance criteria, and programming considerations. Prerequisites: CSCI211 and 221, both with a grade of C or better.

CSCI315

Computer Organization and Architecture

(3,0) 3 alternate years

A hardware-oriented introduction to the structure of modern computer systems, emphasizing the role of, and interrelationships between, the various components. The evolution of modern computer systems. Memory organization, peripheral devices and their connectivity. Instruction sets, arithmetic and central processing unit structure. Control unit organization and operation. Alternative computer architectures. Prerequisite: CSCI201 with grade of C or better.

CSCI319

Network Programming Using Java

(3,0) 3

Overview of Java; applet development in Java; building graphical interfaces; threads and multi-threaded applications; and building client-server applications with Java. Prerequisite: CSCI121 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI321

Computer Graphics

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An introduction to the generation of graphical images by computer. Survey of common graphics devices. Generation of lines and curves. Representation of two-dimensional objects. Techniques for area filling. Scaling, rotation and translation in two dimensions. Rendering three-dimensional objects by projections. Scaling, rotating and translating in three dimensions. Hidden line and hidden surface detection and removal. Prerequisites: CSCI201, and either MATH112 or 151, all with a minimum grade of C.

CSCI325

Developing Web Applications with JavaScript and PHP

(2,2) 3

Transform static web sites into dynamic web sites using a combination of client and server-side web programs. Process and validate forms, build interactive web sites, manage web databases and publish web sites to a web server. Prerequisites: CSCI121, CSCI211 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI326

Developing Web Applications with ASP.NET

(2,2) 3

Create and publish web server and web database applications using the Microsoft ASP.net framework; Emphasis on improving performance, security, and isolating business logic from the user interface. Prerequisites: CSCI121, CSCI211 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI333

Systems Programming

(3,0) 3

An introduction to systems-level programming and scripting using UNIX and Perl. UNIX overview and commands; Web servers, CGI, and integration of UNIX and Perl; programming in Perl, including lists, hashes, conditionals, loops, pattern matching, process and file management, and other topics. Prerequisites: CSCI121 and 221, both with a grade of C or better.

CSCI334

Operating Systems Concepts

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Definition and historical development of operating systems. Characteristics of batch, interactive and multiprogramming systems. File systems, processor and memory management. Communication, concurrency, deadlock and protection. Prerequisite: CSCI333 with a minimum grade of C.

CSCI341

Discrete Structures for Computer Science

(4,0) 4 alternate years

Formal logic and proof techniques; recursion, recurrence relations and combinational methods; analysis of algorithms; algebraic structures; trees and graphs; Boolean algebra and computer logic; models of computation and formal languages. Emphasis will be on applications to computer science. Prerequisites: CSCI121 with a grade of C or better, and either MATH112 or 151 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI342

Advanced Programming Techniques

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Advanced data structures and programming techniques, including: divide and conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, graph algorithms, balanced trees. Emphasis will also be placed on the software development process, debugging and testing methodologies. Prerequisite: CSCI201 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI348

Network Operating Systems II

(2,2) 3

A continuation of using and administering network operating systems. Students will also be introduced to virtualization of servers, as well as interaction between virtualized machines. Topics include: file system and network service management, remote access, security, printing, and disaster recovery. Course topics will be presented in the context of different network operating systems. Prerequisite: CSCI248 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI361

System Analysis and Design

(3,0) 3 on demand

A study of using structured analysis and structure design techniques to understand complex systems and implement the knowledge gained into a workable and usable management, business, or computer system. Topics include information systems development, project management, data and process modeling, system proposals, input and output design, prototyping, and systems construction and implementation. Prerequisite: CSCI211 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI412

UNIX Network Administration

(2,2) 3

Network administration how to and issues for Linux. Installation of a Linux networked system, maintenance and upgrade of a Linux installation, security issues, common scripting languages, system admin tasks, NFS, and mail systems; other UNIXes. Prerequisites: CSCI221 and 281, both with a grade of C or better.

CSCI418

Senior Project I

(1,4) 3

This course is the first part of the two-part sequence CSCI418/419. The student will begin a two-semester project by designing and implementing a software system, by creating or maintaining a network system, or by working on some other related computer project. The projects will vary each year to allow students to work on a state-of-the-art real-world system. Students in CSCI418 must take CSCI419 the following semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CSCI419

Senior Project II

(1,4) 3

The second of a two-part sequence, CSCI419 provides students with the skills necessary for completion of their project design from CSCI418. In this course, the student will implement the design of a software system created in Senior Project I (CSCI418). The projects will vary each year to allow students to implement their knowledge to create a real-world software system. In addition, the student will analyze numerous ethical considerations associated with being a computer professional. Prerequisite: CSCI418 with a grade of C or better.

CSCI422

Network and Computer Security

(2,2) 3

An advanced look at common computer and network exploitation techniques in use today. Course emphasis is on how exploits work (both the exploiter's perspective as well as the software faults that allow these exploits to exist), what can be done with the exploits, as well as mitigation and solution techniques for containing the damage to the administered systems. Prerequisites: CSCI121, 221, 333 and 412.

CSCI428

Computer Science Cooperative Education I

(3,0) 3

A practicum in which students work in a supervised capacity (one-site) with industry. The student will spend a semester in a co-op position in some field of computer science (networks, application development, database administration, etc.). The student will develop a co-op project proposal that must be submitted to and approved by the computer science faculty. The co-op experience must be of a significant nature such that it serves as capstone computer science experience for the student. This is the first of a two-course sequence. Prerequisites: CSCI290 and permission of the computer science faculty.

CSCI429

Computer Science Cooperative Education II

(3,0) 3

A continuation of CSCI428 where students work in a supervised capacity in industry in a field of computer science. This is the second of a two-course sequence. The focus of this course is to finish the cooperative experience in industry and prepare a final report on the two-semester experience. The student will write a final report on the co-op experience and defend that report to the computer science faculty in open forum. Prerequisite: CSCI428.

CSCI438

Computer Science Research Project I

(3,0) 3

This is a senior-level course in which students are actively involved in a faculty-supervised and guided research project. Students develop a research plan for some portion of the project and implement that plan. In particular, the student will work to develop a proposal of the expected research goals and create a project timeline and budget. The student's faculty advisor and the computer science faculty must approve the plan. This is the first of a two-course sequence. Prerequisite: Senior status and permission of the computer science faculty.

CSCI439

Computer Science Research Project II

(3,0) 3

This is a continuation of CSCI438 Computer Research Project I. Prerequisite: CSCI438.

CSCI461

Decision Support and Expert Systems

(3,0) 3 on demand

A study of using computer-based support systems for assisting managers in decision making. Topics include the decision making process; expert systems and artificial intelligence; knowledge engineering, data acquisition, and machine learning; data mining and data visualization; and designing and building decision support systems. Prerequisites: CSCI211 and either ECON201, 202 or 302, both courses with a grade of C or better.

CSCI490

Individualized Research Topics in Computer Science

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in computer science for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the deparment head. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher.

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DANC101

Ballet I

(0,3) 1

An introduction to the art of classical ballet, its traditions, history and vocabulary. Class will include barre exercises, center floor work, exercises in strength and flexibility. A final exam of performance will be given at the end of the semester. This course may be repeated twice for credit.

DANC110

Dance Company

(0,2) 1

The Dance Company class will meet each week to work on technique in a variety of dance styles, choreograph and rehearse in preparation for outreach programs and performance. The goal of this course is to produce high quality, pre-professional level performance and to serve the community, both on and off campus by providing performances that are entertaining and educational. Prerequisites: A minimum of 2 years dance training and instructor\'s permission. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

DANC120

Jazz Dance I

(0,3) 1

Introduction of jazz dance; its history and development as a performing art. Basic principals, steps and combinations. Prerequisite: no previous dance training necessary. This course may be repeated once for credit.

DANC125

Modern Dance I

(0,3) 1

Modern dance will introduce students to dance through the exploration of freedom of movement and self expression. Class will include warm-up exercises, dance combinations, experiments in creativity and choreography and exercises in flexibility and strength to prepare the body to move more efficiently. To familiarize students with the history and variety of modern dance. This course may be repeated once for credit.

DANC130

Scottish Highland Dance

(0,3) 1

Introduction to basic movements, steps and terminology of Highland dance. Emphasis on fundamentals of footwork and introduction to the history and cultural background of Scottish dance. Dances will include the Highland Fling and Sword Dance along with Scottish Country dances. Students will be given opportunities to perform and compete. No previous dance training is necessary. This course may be repeated once for credit.

DANC201

Ballet II

(0,3) 1

A continuation of the art of classical ballet. Steps, exercises and combinations are done at an accelerated pace. Movements are more technical and intricate. Pre- pointe and pointe work can be done. Performance will be given at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: Ballet I, or previous ballet training, and instructor permission. This course may be repeated twice for credit.

DANC205

Creative Movement for Elementary Educators

(1,4) 3

Exploration of movement as a means to improve communication, body/kinetic awareness, creative expression, self-confidence, self-esteem and perceptual motor development. Focus on teaching, creativity, and lesson planning with elementary school students. Prerequisite: Student should have an interest in working with young children. No previous dance experience is necessary.

DANC210

Movement for Actors

(1,4) 3

An active study in the principles and techniques of stage form, style, and projection necessary for actors or dancers. Helping actors/dancers to move more efficiently on stage. Emphasis on the breath, tension and relaxation, improvisation, body alignment and movement skills including the elements of dance, movement qualities, posture, and physical exercise to help the body move effectively beyond physical constraints. Prerequisite: Strong interest in theatre, or dance recommended.

DANC220

Musical Theatre Tap/Jazz

(0,3) 1

Introduction to dance appropriate for use in Musical Theatre. Dance to support musical storyline. Several styles of jazz technique along with modern concepts, basic steps, terminology, combination, turns and leaps. Beginning tap: basic steps, patterns, turns and combinations. This course may be repeated twice for credit.

DANC225

Modern Dance II

(0,3) 1

A more concentrated and vigorous study of modern dance. Exploration of freedom of movement, creative self-expression, trust and partner work. Modern dance techniques and movements will be honed. Students will be responsible for researching past works and modern dancers. Students will be expected to create individual as well as group pieces. Prerequisite: DANC125 or permission of instructor. This course may be repeated once for credit.

DANC301

Ballet III

(0,3) 1

A continuation of the art of classical ballet. Steps, exercises and combinations are done at a more accelerated pace. Movements are more technical and intricate. Pointe and pre-pointe work will be done in this class. Performance guaranteed. Prerequisite: DANCE101 and DANCE102, or permission of instructor. This course may be repeated once for credit.

DANC305

Dance History

(3,0) 3

Focus on dance chronologically throughout the world during early lineage based societies, the Middles Ages in Asia and Europe, the Renaissance, and dance in America. Theatrical dance genres, ballet, modern, tap, jazz and musical theatre will be viewed, reviewed and discussed as well as personal views of dance in contemporary society. Prerequiste: students with a strong interest in dance along with a dance background in ballet, or modern dance is recommended.

DANC310

Choreography

(1,4) 3

Choreography is the art of making dances. As a result of a semester filled with reading, reflection, experimenting, examining and sharing dance, students will create multiple short dances and a final project. Students may be responsible for producing a student dance concert to showcase their work. Prerequiste: At least two years of previous dance training in ballet, or modern dance is highly recommended, and permission of instructor.

DANC401

Senior Thesis

1-4 4

A final project sumitted by senior students. Course credits will be determined by the magnitude of the project. Prerequisites: Student should be pursuing a dance minor, or have completed at least 3 years of dance technique, courses in Choreography, Dance History, and at least 2 semesters of Dance Company with a minimum of 4 formal performances. Permission of Instructor. This course may be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

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DATA225

Word Processing Techniques

(3,0) 3

Students will cover basics of word processing including document creating, saving, printing, and some advanced features such as table, merge, graphics and report formatting. Hands-on experience is scheduled in labs outside of classroom hours.

DATA231

Database

(3,0) 3

In this course, students will cover advanced database applications in business including creating database tables, forms, reports, mailing labels and charts; creating relationships between database tables; using database wizards; and performing queries and filtering records. A student may repeat this course covering a different database management system for a maximum of six credit hours.

DATA235

Spreadsheets

(3,0) 3

In this course, students will cover advanced spreadsheet applications in business including writing and working with formulas; creating templates; finding and organizing information by filtering, sorting and subtotaling; working with multiple worksheets; creating charts; working with data tables and scenario management; and importing data into spreadsheet software. A student may repeat this course covering a different spreadsheet software program for a maximum of six credit hour.

DATA250

Desktop Publishing and Presentation Design

(3,0) 3

Introduction to document design and layout, use of font, color and graphics to produce newsletters, brochures and presentations. Concepts included are presentation preparation and delivery. Graphics software will be used. Prerequisites: ENGL111 and a working knowledge of word processing.

DATA261

Multimedia Applications

(3,0) 3

In this course, students will be introduced to the design and production of Web sites. Graphics, animation, and sound will be incorporated in the creation of interactive Web pages. Macromedia Studio, which includes Dreamweaver and Flash, will be used.

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ECON201

Principles of Macroeconomics

(3,0) 3

Nature and scope of economics; national income accounting; problems of unemployment and price instability; public revenues and expenditures; money and banking; fiscal and monetary policies to promote stability and economic growth. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam or MATH102 with a grade of C or better.

ECON202

Principles of Microeconomics

(3,0) 3

Principles of economic reasoning; supply and demand analysis; theories of production; price and output determination under each of the four market structures; factor returns and income distribution theories; public policy implications. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam or MATH102 with a grade of C or better.

ECON208

Honors Principles of Microeconomics

(3,0) 3

This course employs algebra, geometry and calculus intensively in the development of principles of microeconomics. The topics covered are nominally the same as in ECON202; however, there is more advanced coverage of topics in which a knowledge of mathematics is required. Prerequisites: MATH151 or 112. Credit not allowed for both ECON202 and 208.

ECON209

Honors Principles of Macroeconomics

(3,0) 3

This course employs algebra, geometry and calculus intensively in the development of principles of macroeconomics. The topics covered are nominally the same as in ECON201; however, there is more advanced coverage of topics in which a knowledge of mathematics is required. Prerequisites: MATH151 or 112. Credit not allowed for both ECON201 and 209.

ECON302

Managerial Economics

(4,0) 4

A study of the application of economic analysis to managerial decisions. Topics include the firm and its environment, demand estimation, production and cost analysis, optimization and profit maximization, analysis of markets, pricing strategy and analysis of project decisions. Prerequisite: MATH112 or equivalent.

ECON304

Money, Banking and Monetary Policy

(3,0) 3

Monetary theory; study of financial institutions and central bank authorities; monetary policy and its limitations; changing structure of financial markets and industry; relationships between money, prices and national income. Prerequisite: ECON201.

ECON305

Public Finance

(3,0) 3

The economics of public finance, including taxation, public expenditures and fiscal policy. Rationale and objectives of government activity in a market system; distribution of tax burden; income redistribution effects of taxation and expenditure programs. Prerequisite: ECON201 or 202.

ECON307

Environmental Economics

(3,0) 3

This course examines the application of economic analysis to problems of air, water, forests, fisheries, energy, and soil use; economic approaches to valuing the environment; the benefits and costs of pollution control; and alternative policy approaches to environmental problems with emphasis on emissions trading. Prerequisite: ECON202.

ECON308

Intermediate Microeconomics

(3,0) 3

Theory of demand; consumer choice and utility analysis; production and cost analysis; price-output determination under the four market structures; resource allocation; public policy and managerial applications emphasized. Pre-requisite: ECON202.

ECON309

Intermediate Macroeconomics

(3,0) 3

Determinants and measurement of national income; theories of consumption and investment; aggregate economic analysis including IS-LM and aggregate demand-aggregate supply models; unemployment and inflation; stabilization policies; economic growth. Prerequisite: ECON201.

ECON407

Introductory Econometrics

(3,0) 3

This course provides an introduction to the theory and use of regression analysis to solve problems in economics. The classical regression model is developed and extended to multiple regression. Topics include data problems, model specification, multicollinearity, goodness of fit, qualitative independent variables, hetroscedasticity, serial correlation, qualitative and limited dependent variables, and forecasting. Prerequisites: BUSN211 or MATH207, ECON201, 202, MATH112 or 151.

ECON408

International Economics

(3,0) 3

Pure theory of trade and comparative advantage; free trade versus protectionism; trade problems of developing nations; balance of payment accounting; exchange rates; international monetary systems. Prerequisites: ECON201 and 202.

ECON409

Seminar in Economics

(1-2,0) 1-2

Discussion of economic issues, theories and their applications. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the instructor for a total of four credits.

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EDSE301

Introduction to Special Education

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the historical and legal bases of special education. Research based examination of the models, theories and philosophy of teaching students with disabilities. Prerequisites: admission to the School of Education. This course may NOT be repeated for credit.

EDSE302

Communication and Community

(3,0) 3

Developing effective communication between all participants in the educational community involved in the education of students with special needs. Topics include preparing and implementing IEPs and communication with parents, students and teachers. Prerequisite: EDSE301.

EDSE320

Introduction to Learning Disabilities

(4,0) 4

An examination of the educational research, characteristics, diagnostic principles and practices related to teaching students with learning disabilities. Psychological theories (e.g. developmental, behavioral, and cognitive) of teaching students with learning disabilities and associated learning strategies are reviewed. Prerequisite: EDSE301.

EDSE330

Introduction to Cognitive Impairments

(3,0) 3

An examination of the educational research, characteristics, diagnostic principles and practices related to teaching students with cognitive impairments. Prerequisite: EDSE301. The course may NOT be repeated for credit.

EDSE340

Introduction to Emotional/Behavioral Impairments

(3,0) 3

An examination of the educational research, characteristics, diagnostic principles and practices related to teaching students with emotional and behavioral impairments. Prerequisite: EDSE301. The course may NOT be repeated for credit.

EDSE401

Issues and Trends Impacting Learning Disabilities & Special Education

(3,0) 3

Contemporary issues in the education of students with learning disabilities and other special needs will be explored. Policies and regulations, requirements and procedures for service, curriculum adaptation and modification, delivery models relating to placement, privacy, advocacy, and family education will be discussed. Prerequisite: EDSE301.

EDSE403

Assessment and Diagnosis

(3,0) 3

An examination of the education research and best practices related to identification, assessment, instruction, accommodation, and implementation of special education programs. Legal responsibilities of the school in the areas of assessment, diagnosis, and diversity will also be addressed. Prerequisite: EDSE320.

EDSE404

Instruction and Technology: Preschool to Adult

(4,0) 4

An examination of the research and best practices using assistive technologies to increase, maintain or improve the capabilities of students with disabilities. Prerequisite: EDSE301.

EDSE410

Records, Regulations and Requirements

(3,0) 3

An examination of the regulations, requirements, policies and procedures for developing and maintaining records for students with disabilities. Legislation related to privacy and family education will be discussed. Prerequisite: EDSE301. The course may NOT be repeated for credit.

EDSE430

Diagnosis, Development and Delivery

(3,0) 3

An examination of the research and best practices for identifying and implementing accommodations and modification in the curriculum and instructional delivery in the instruction of students with disabilities. Topics include the manifestations of student disabilities with developmental stage, cognitive development and psychosocial development. Prerequisite: EDSE301. The course may NOT be repeated for credit.

EDSE480

Student Teaching Seminar: Special Education

(1,0) 1

A seminar for teacher candidates during a student teaching internship in a special education classroom. Prerequisites: EDSE410 and 420, and admission to student teaching. The course may NOT be repeated for credit.

EDSE492

Internship/Supervised Student Teaching: Learning Disabilities

(8,0) 8

Supervised student teaching internship in a special education classroom, focus on working with students with learning disabilities. Prerequisites: EDSE410 and 420, and admission to student teaching. The course may NOT be repeated for credit.

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EDUC150

Reflections on Learning and Teaching

(3,0) 3

Students will examine their experiences and assumptions about schooling in order to understand the multiple roles of teachers, characteristics of effective teaching practice, and the roles of school in society. Human development (physical, emotional and cognitive) is studied in terms of teaching and learning. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: successful completion with a C- grade or better or placement beyond ENGL091.

EDUC250

Student Diversity and Schools

(3,0) 3

This is a study of the forms of diversity found among students and how these differences affect students' participation in school. History and philosophy of American schools are also studied as are the legal responsibilities and rights of teachers and schools. Students study cooperative learning, questioning techniques, make school visits and plan and teach a short, engaging lesson. Fieldwork required. Pre- or corequisite: EDUC150.

EDUC301

Learning Theory and Teaching Practice

(4,0) 4

A study of contemporary theories of human learning: how they are generated, researched and applied in teaching practices. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to teaching and learning and the decisions which teachers make in applying theory to diverse classroom situations. Includes extensive classroom observations in K-12 schools. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: EDUC150, 250 and admission to teacher education program.

EDUC330

Reading in the Elementary Classroom

(3,0) 3

Study of reading as a process of constructing meaning through dynamic, interaction among reader, the text, and the context of the reading situation. Includes objectives, content, materials, organization and methods of teaching reading in the elementary school Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250 and admission to the teacher education program. Pre- or corequisite EDUC301.

EDUC410

Corrective Reading in the Classroom

(3,0) 3

Study of classroom methods for the diagnosis of students' reading strengths and weaknesses. Planning and implementing corrective and remedial interventions based on diagnosis. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301, 330 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC411

Elementary Language Arts and Methods Across the Curriculum

(3,0) 3

A study of general strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective learning including the use of language arts as a vehicle for integrated curriculum. Classroom management and organization for productive learning communities are also studied. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301, 330 and admission to teacher eduction program.

EDUC420

Math Methods for Elementary Teachers

(2,0) 2

A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective mathematics instruction. Students learn to plan and present mathematics lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and bench marks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Pre- or corequisites: MATH103 and 104. Prerequisites: EDUC301 and admission to teacher education program.

EDUC421

Science Methods for Elementary Teachers

(2,0) 2

A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective science instruction. Students learn to plan and present science lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC422

Social Studies Methods for Elementary Teachers

(2,0) 2

A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective social studies instruction. Students learn to plan and present social studies lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC423

Arts Methods for Classroom Teachers

(2,0) 2

Elementary teacher candidates examine the knowledge, understanding, and application of the content, functions, and achievements of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to promote elementary students' ability to create, perform and respond in and through the arts. Candidates demonstrate their understanding that all students can learn the knowledge and skills that make up the arts.

EDUC424

Health/Physical Methods for Classroom Teachers

(2,0) 2

Elementary teacher candidates demonstrate the knowledge, understanding, and application of research-based strategies to create opportunities for all students to develop critical knowledge, skills, and behaviors that contribute to life-long health. Candidates demonstrate knowledge and understanding through planning and appropriate implementation of effective past and current research-based human movement and physical activity strategies as central elements to foster active, life-long healthy lifestyles for all elementary students.

EDUC430

General Methods for Secondary Teachers

(3,0) 3

A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate learning at the secondary level including classroom management and organization for productive learning communities. The multiple roles of the teacher in the secondary classroom are examined including participant, colleague, researcher, reflective practitioner, accountable professional, counselor and mentor. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC431

The Secondary Learner

(3,0) 3

A study of the dilemmas of adolescents as they affect students in secondary schools. The course focuses on the special needs and sensitivities of adolescents and implications for instruction and classroom management. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC440

Reading in the Content Area

(3,0) 3

A study of reading methods appropriate to use in secondary classrooms. Includes formal and informal assessment procedures for determining students' abilities and the accompanying strategies to enhance content area comprehension and concept development. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC441

Language Arts Methods for Secondary Teachers

(3,0) 3

Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of core subject matter to diverse learners. Includes integrated technology, laboratory and field experiences. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC442

Math Methods for Secondary Teachers

(3,0) 3

Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of teaching mathematics to diverse secondary learners. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC443

Science Methods for Secondary Teachers

(3,0) 3

Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of teaching science to diverse learners. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to teacher education program.

EDUC444

Social Studies Methods for Secondary Teachers

(3,0) 3

Curriculum, objectives, content, materials, organization, methods and assessment of teaching social studies to diverse secondary learners. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to teacher education program.

EDUC445

Teaching Computer Science in the Secondary Classroom

(3,0) 3

Techniques, materials and models for computer science teachers. Classroom and instructional management. Hardware and software evaluation and selection. Computer programming, including a team software development project. Web pages as an educational resource. Legal, ethical, social, economic and personal issues. Prerequisites: CSCI101 or 103, 201, EDUC150, 250, 301, and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC446

Business Education Methods for Secondary Teachers

(3,0) 3

A study of strategies and methodologies to facilitate effective business course instruction. Students learn to plan and present office cluster, accounting, marketing and computer software lessons and units using contemporary methods. Students use national and state standards and benchmarks in planning instruction and assessment. Integrated technology component. Field work required. Pre-requisites: EDUC150, 250, 301 and admission to the teacher education program.

EDUC447

Theories and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages

(3,0) 3

This course focuses on the teaching and learning of foreign languages in K-12 school settings. We will be looking at second/foreign language acquisition theories and the methods/strategies underlying the teaching of the four main domains (speaking, reading, writing, listening), plus grammar, vocabulary and culture of the foreign language. We will also be studying the related areas of foreign language materials selection and use, the integration and use of standards into the curriculum and instruction, and assessment and evaluation in teaching a foreign language. The field work component of this course will act as a cohesive tie between what we explore, study and experiment with in course readings and discussions and the real world of foreign language teachings. Prerequisites: EDUC150, 250 and admission to the teacher education program. Pre- or corequisites: EDUC301 and 330.

EDUC451

Directed Study in Language Arts Methods

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC441.

EDUC452

Directed Study in Mathematics Methods

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC442.

EDUC453

Directed Study in Science Methods

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC443.

EDUC454

Directed Study in Social Studies Methods

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC444.

EDUC455

Directed Study in Computer Science Methods

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC445.

EDUC456

Directed Study in Business/Economics Methods

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC446.

EDUC457

Independent Study: Theories/Methods Teaching Foreign Languages

(1-3,0) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor. This course will substitute for EDUC447.

EDUC480

Internship in Teaching Seminar

(1,0) 1

A seminar course for students currently enrolled in EDUC492 Internship/Advanced Methods: [Subject] to discuss issues in teacher education, classroom management, teaching of all students and professional development. Co-requisite: EDUC492.

EDUC490

Research Topics in Education

(1-4) 1-4

Individual study under supervision of teacher education faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisites: admission to the teacher education program, senior status and permission of instructor.

EDUC491

Internship/Advanced Methods: [Subject]

8

Directed and evaluated internship in heterogeneous classrooms. Teaching worthwhile content to students with varied learning needs. Theoretical and field-based explorations of common teaching dilemmas. Student will spend at least 25 clock hours weekly with a teacher in a school for field teaching experience. Prerequisites: successful completion of baccalaureate degree and all previous EDUC courses and field experiences. Permission and availability of participating schools. Corequisites: EDUC601 and 602. May be repeated once.

EDUC492

Internship/Advanced Methods: [Subject]

8

Continuing internship in heterogeneous classrooms at selected schools. Increased emphasis on independent teaching. Maintaining classroom communities that ensure equitable access to important knowledge and skills. Assessing academic and social outcomes. Student will spend at least 25 clock hours weekly with a teacher in a school for field teaching experience. Grading will be CR/NC. Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching internship. Corequisite: EDUC480.

EDUC602

Action Research I

(3,0) 3

Qualitative and quantitative research methods on teaching and learning. Criteria for judging validity and applicability of research-based knowledge. Framing educational problems worthy of inquiry through the research design and assessment of an Action Research proposal. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA: C&I program or permission of instructor, or Co-requisites: EDUC480 and EDUC492.

EDUC604

Action Research II

(3,0) 3

Collecting, analyzing and interpreting data on teaching, learning, and/or education policy - through Action Research in an education setting. Implementing the Action Research proposal designed in EDUC602. Dilemmas surrounding research on teaching practice. Appraising and reporting results of inquiry. Learners work independently with supervision of faculty. Pre-requisites: EDUC602 and formal admission to MA: C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC605

Integrated Approaches in Curricular Design and Implementation

(3,0) 3

Theoretical and practical examination of the principles of integrated curriculum, acquisition of skills and knowledge bases to facilitate the development of curriculum that is integrative, responsive to student needs, and meets recommended curricular frameworks and benchmarks. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor; or co-requisites of EDUC480 and 491.

EDUC611

Psychological Foundations of Education

(4,0) 4

Advanced research and study on educational psychology and learning theory, including constructivist theory, brain based research, cognition, and their application to instructional strategies. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC612

Philosophical Foundations of Education

(4,0) 4

Examines the philosophical underpinnings of education through study of individuals such as John Dewey, Paulo Friere and Maxine Greene. Research on the philosophical perspectives of education, the role of teachers and learners in education, and on applying a philosophical framework to contemporary educational issues. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC613

Sociological Foundations of Education

(4,0) 4

Advanced research and study on sociological foundations of education including the relationship of social factors to educational practices, race/gender/disabilities in the classroom, diversity in language cultures, school reform and multicultural perspectives. Focus on applications in instructional practice. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC621

Educational Leadership

(4,0) 4

A course to assist the classroom teacher addressing improving classroom and school effectiveness. An examination of effective supervisory principles and practices which can be used to strengthen instructional effectiveness and facilitate school improvement. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC622

Integrating Technology into Curriculum and Instruction

(4,0) 4

Understanding of the uses of technology in the presentation and construction of knowledge and the management of knowledge in educational settings. Emphasis on the use of technology as a tool in facilitating teaching effectiveness and student learning. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC623

Foundations of Special Education

(4,0) 4

This course will provide an overview of the history, philosophy and social context of Special Education. It will also address instruction of students with special needs. This course is intended to provide the underpinning for and concepts to be explored in advanced study in Special Education. Course reflects on teaching as enabling diverse learners to inquire into and construct subject-specific meanings, on adapting subject matter to learner diversity, and on constructing curriculum to serve the needs of diverse learners. Prerequisite: admission to program or permission of instructor.

EDUC624

Reading: Research and Methodologies

(3,0) 3

Theories, research, and methods focused on enabling students to become self-regulated readers who effectively use multiple strategies in their reading. Strategic processes in comprehension, word identification, critical thinking, and analysis will be examine as will the role of the teacher as a model and mediator of such processes in a variety of reading contexts. Pre-requisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC625

Multimedia Production in Instruction and Assessment

(3,0) 3

The use of multimedia to enhance instructional and assessment strategies in education. Developing production skills in the construction of professional multimedia projects through the editing of digital images, video, and audio files. Focus on the use of multimedia as authentic assessment in an educational setting. Digital narrative as an instructional and assessment tool. Prerequisite: admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC626

Educational Assessment and Measurement

(3,0) 3

Principles and practices of evaluation and measurement, reliability, validity; informal and formal strategies; performance assessment. Innovations in educational assessment and accountability as well as teacher-made tests will be examined. Prerequisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC627

Models of Teaching

(3,0) 3

Models of teaching are designs for instruction developed to support particular types of learning. In this course, students will examine the theoretical and research bases of various models of teaching in terms of the instructional issues in their roles and educational setting. Prerequisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC628

Supervision of Instruction

(2,0) 2

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the principles and processes of supervising instruction within the framework of teacher growth. Students will explore the rationales, assumptions, processes, and implications related to a variety of instructional supervision practices, contexts, and role as well as discuss issues associated with the supervision of instruction and teacher growth. Prerequisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC629

Issues in Special Education

(3,0) 3

Contemporary issues in the education of students with special needs; assessment and identification; service delivery models; instruction and social/emotional considerations; parent/professional relationships; research priorities; and transition to employment. Prerequisite: Admission to MA C&I program or permission of instructor.

EDUC631

Teaching Language Arts: [Topic]

1-4

A directed study course in English, speech and language to meet the individual's professional development goals through study to increase content knowledge and skills. The student will develop three research-based teaching units based on language arts content appropriate to the grade level of his/her teaching certificate/endorsements (K-12), and/or a research project or paper as determined by the instructor and approved by the School of Education. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA C&I program or approval of instructor; approved plan of study; and corequisite of concurrent enrollment in approved 300/400-level course.

EDUC632

Teaching Mathematics: [Topic]

1-4

A directed study course in mathematics and computer science to meet the individual's professional development goals through study to increase content knowledge and skills. The student will develop three research-based teaching units based on math/cs content appropriate to the grade level of his/her teaching certificate/endorsements (K-12), and/or a research project or paper as determined by the instructor and approved by the School of Education. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA C&I program or approval of instructor; approved plan of study; and corequisite of concurrent enrollment in approved 300/400-level course.

EDUC633

Teaching Science: [Topic]

1-4

A directed study course in life, physical and Earth/space sciences to meet the individual's professional development goals through study to increase content knowledge and skills. The student will develop three research-based teaching units based on science content appropriate to the grade level of his/her teaching certificate/endorsements (K-12), and/or a research project or paper as determined by the instructor and approved by the School of Education. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA C&I program or approval of instructor; approved plan of study; and corequisite of concurrent enrollment in approved 300/400-level course.

EDUC634

Teaching Social Studies: [Topic]

1-4

A directed study course in history, geography, political science or economics to meet the individual's professional development goals through study to increase content knowledge and skills. The student will develop three research-based teaching units based on social studies content appropriate to the grade level of his/her teaching certificate/endorsements (K-12), and/or a research project or paper as determined by the instructor and approved by the School of Education. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA C&I program or approval of instructor; approved plan of study; and corequisite of concurrent enrollment in approved 300/400-level course.

EDUC635

Applying: [specify course title by section]

1

A directed study course applying the content knowledge developed through approved EDUC 900-level sections within the context of curriculum and instruction. The student will develop three research based teaching units based on content appropriate to the grade level of their teaching certificate/endorsements (K-12), and/or a research project or paper as determined by the instructor and approved by the LSSU Department of Education. Prerequisite: admission to the MA-C&I program or approved plan of study, permission of instructor. Co- or Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment or successful completion (B or higher) of an approved 900-level section. Course may be repeated up to three times for credit with permission of the graduate coordinator or Dean, up to once per section number or course title.

EDUC690

Special Topics

1-3

Courses and workshops designed to meet the special needs of K-12 teachers, e.g. workshops approved by the School of Education for graduate credit. The transcript will specify the specific content, e.g. Special Topics (K-4 Mathematics), etc. Approval of the School of Education is required to apply credits earned through special topics courses in the MA C&I program. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA C&I program or approval of instructor.

EDUC695

Capstone Research I

(2,0) 2

A practicum course for the development of a capstone curricular project that is integrated, responsive to student needs, incorporates appropriate instructional technology, and is aligned with recommended curriculum frameworks. Learners work independently with supervision of School of Education Graduate Faculty to complete a curricular portfolio developed from the duration of the program. Evaluation includes public presentation and oral defense before the School of Education Graduate Faculty. Prerequisites: EDUC602, 604 and 605; and admission to the MA C&I program or approval of instructor

EDUC696

Capstone Research II

(1,0) 1

Formal presentation of the capstone research project in the Master of Arts and Curriculum and Instruction; completion and presentation of the candidate's Professional Teaching and Learning E-Portfolio aligned to the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). Documentation of learning outcomes of K-16 and adult learners required. Offered during spring semester only. Directed study. Prerequisite: EDUC695. Course may not be repeated for additional credit.

EDUC910

Special Topics: [specify course title by section]

1-3

Topical courses in education based on independent or directed study, workshops or other professional development activities. Courses addressing the continuing education requirements of educational professionals (e.g. regular or special educators, instructional assistants, school psychologist, counselors). *Successful completion of this course will award non-matriculated graduate credit which may apply to the renewal of professional certificates/credentials but which does not apply to an LSSU graduate degree. Course number may be repeated when content and course title vary, once per section Grading: S=satisfactory, equivalent to a B or higher in graduate courses or NC=no credit. Tuition for non-matriculated graduate credit will be established by the Board of Trustees.

EDUC920

Special Topics: [specify course title by section]

2

Topical independent study courses in education delivered in partnership with Virtual Education Software. Courses addressing the continuing education requirements of educational professionals (e.g., regular or special educators, instructional assistants, school psychologist, counselors). This course requires DSL-level or higher internet and access to a computer for course assignments and to participation in online sessions and discussion boards. Sections of this course are based on curriculum developed by Virtual Education Software (VESi) and include additional assignments and group interaction including synchronous and asynchronous communication supervised by LSSU faculty. *Successful completion of this course will award non-matriculated graduate credit which may apply to the renewal of professional certificates/credentials but which does not apply to an LSSU graduate degree except at noted in EDUC635. Specific course titles under this number will be listed on the LSSU education web site, and are available through a cooperative contractual agreement with VESi. Course number may be repeated when and course title vary, once per section Grading: S=satisfactory, equivalent to a B or higher in graduate courses or NC=no credit. Tuition for non-matriculated graduate credit will be established by the Board of Trustees.

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EGEE105

Fabrication Fundamentals

(0,2) 1

This course introduces students to the process of the layout and construction of electronic circuits. Students will develop basic skills in the use of electrical CAD software, soldering, construction techniques and circuit board construction. Prerequisite: EGNR101 or 103.

EGEE125

Digital Fundamentals

(3,2) 4

This course provides a study of numbering systems, Boolean algebra, optimization and reduction techniques, combinational logic, sequential digital logic, digital arithmetic, counters, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and microcomputer memory devices. Emphasis is placed on digital circuit design and contemporary programmable logic concepts. Prerequisite: EGNR101 or 103. Pre- or corequisite: MATH140.

EGEE210

Circuit Analysis

(3,2) or (3,2,1) 4

This course is an introduction to the analysis of linear circuits. Topics include: basic circuit elements and their terminal relations, Kirchoff's laws, nodal analysis, mesh analysis, superposition theorem, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, DC transient analysis of RC and RL circuits, phasors, sinusoidal steady-state response of RLC circuits and single-phase and three-phase AC power analysis. Prerequisites: MATH152, EGNR140 and one of the following: EGNR101 or 103.

EGEE250

Micro-Controller Fundamentals

(3,3) 4

An introduction to micro-controller architecture, machine and assembly language program development, and computer system hardware and interfacing techniques. Prerequisite: EGEE125 with a grade of C or better.

EGEE280

Introduction to Signal Processing

(4,0,0) or (4,0,1) 4

The course introduces mathematical techniques used in the design and analysis of analog and digital signal processing systems. Topics include complex numbers, phasor representation of sinusoids, spectral representations, convolution, frequency response, sampling and reconstruction, Fourier series and Fourier transform, and the use of MATLAB as a signal processing tool. Prerequisites: MATH152 and EGNR140.

EGEE305

Analog and Digital Electronics

(2,3) 3

A study of digital electronics, electronic devices, and circuits for non-electrical engineering majors. Topics include discrete logic device, diodes, and amplifiers. Prerequisite: EGEE210 and PHYS232.

EGEE310

Network Analysis

(4,0) 4

A continuation of EGEE210 with an emphasis on the systems approach to circuit analysis and design. Topics include the Laplace transform, transfer functions, frequency response, Fourier series, filter design, and op-amps. Prerequisites: EGEE210, EGEE280. Pre- or corequisite: MATH310.

EGEE320

Digital Design

(3,3) 4

A study of logical and electronic circuit design techniques including combinational and sequential circuits, programmable logic devices, MSI and LSI devices. Synchronous state machine design using computer-based tools is emphasized for control applications. Prerequisite: EGEE125 with a grade of C or better, and either EGNR265 or CSCI121.

EGEE330

Electro-Mechanical Systems

(3,3) 4 or (3,3,1) 4

A study of three-phase circuits, electro-mechanical energy conversion, transformers, AC and DC machines, motor drives, and controlled converters. The laboratory activities include planning and conducting tests of electrical machines, and simulation with physical modeling software. Prerequisite: EGEE210 with a grade of C or better, EGNR140, and MATH152.

EGEE345

Fundamentals of Engineering Electromagnetics

(3,0) 3

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory. Topics include vector analysis, electrostatic fields and magnetostatic fields, while familiarizing students with the applications of such fields, Maxwell\'s equations, and an introduction to wave propagation and radiation. Prerequisites: EGEE210 with a grade of C or better, MATH251 and PHYS232. Pre- or corequisite: MATH310.

EGEE355

Microcontroller Systems

(3,3) 4

A study of microcontroller systems design based on the 8/16/32-bit microcontrollers. Assembly and C languages are used for program development in the design of embedded systems. Interfacing techniques, real-time control, and microcontroller emulator use are emphasized. Prerequisites: EGEE250 and one of the following: EGNR265 or CSCI121.

EGEE365

Vehicle Instrumentation

(3,3) 4

The course introduces instrumentation hardware and software that support the development, operation, and testing of vehicle systems. Topics include vehicle networks, data acquisition and control systems, modeling and simulation, and hardware adn sensors interfacing. Prerequisites: ENGEE210 and (EGNR265 or CSCI122)

EGEE370

Electronic Devices

(3,3) (3,3,1) 4

This course provides an in-depth study of the basic electronic devises. Topics include diodes, MOS field effect transistors, bipolar junction transistors as well as amplifier concepts such as gain, bandwidth, biasing and frequency response. Diode rectifiers, common amplifier configurations, digital CMOS logic circuits, latches, flip-flops and RAM cells are studied as applications of electronic devices. Prerequisites: EGEE125 with a C or better grade, EGEE210 with a C or better grade, and MATH152.

EGEE375

Electronic Circuits

(3,3) 4

This course provides a study of analog applications of MOS field effect transistors and bipolar junction transistors. Topics include single-stage integrated-circuit amplifiers, differential and multi-stage amplifiers, feedback in amplifier circuits, operations amplifiers, signal generators, waveform-shaping circuits, output stages and power amplifiers. Prerequisite: EGEE370.

EGEE425

Digital Signal Processing

(2,2) 3

A study of the application of real-time digital signal processing in analog and digital control system design. The course emphasizes discrete Fourier transforms, design of digital filters, sampling theory, and process control using data acquisition equipment and computer simulation techniques. Additional emphasis is placed on communication theory in relation to its utilization of DSP technology. Prerequisites: EGEE250, and EGEE 280 with a grade of C or better, EGNR140, and either EGNR265 or CSCI121.

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EGEM220

Statics

(3,0) or (3,0,1) 3

A study of theory and application of engineering mechanics principles with emphasis on vector analysis, free body diagrams, properties of areas, and problem solving. This emphasis includes applying principles of equilibrium to particles and rigid bodies. Prerequisite: EGNR140. Pre, or Corequisites: MATH152 and PHYS231.

EGEM320

Dynamics

(3,0) or (3,0,1) 3

A study of theory and applications of dynamics and problem-solving techniques. Topics include position, velocity, and acceleration analysis of particles and rigid bodies. Newton\'s second law, work and energy and impulse and momentum are covered. Prerequisites: MATH152 and EGEM220.

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EGET110

Applied Electricity

(3,2) 4

This course covers basic principles of DC and AC electricity. Topics include resistance, inductance, capacitance, series and parallel circuits, magnetic circuits, transformers and electrical motors. Laboratory exercises will reinforce the lecture material. Prerequisite: MATH140 with a C or better.

EGET175

Applied Electronics

(3,2) 4

An introduction to the operation of basic electronic devices including diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers. Topics include: Power supplies, amplifiers, frequency response and filter circuits. Laboratory exercises will reinforce the lecture material and introduce computer circuit analysis. Prerequisite: EGET110.

EGET310

Electronic Manufacturing Processes

(3,3) 4

This course will cover traditional and modern techniques for the design, fabrication, and testing of electronic circuit boards. Traditional techniques include wire cutting and stripping and manual and wave soldering. Modern techniques include the routing of multilayer surface mount boards, solder paste stenciling and dispensing, pick-an-place assembly and programming, reflow oven soldering, and rework techniques. Additional topics may include mechanical mounting, assembly line coordination, cell manufacturing, and potting and sealing materials. Prerequisites: either (EGET110 and EGET175) or EGEE210.

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EGME110

Manufacturing Processes

(2,3) 3

An introduction to basic manufacturing processes. Both theory and applications of various processes are covered in lecture and laboratory. Topics include: machining processes, welding and related processes, metal forming processes, and plastic forming processes. Included in machining processes is a limited scope computer aided design and computer numerical control project. The topics of measuring instruments and laboratory safety will also be addressed in the lecture and laboratory. Co-requisite or Prerequisite: EGME141 or Permission of Instructor.

EGME141

Solid Modeling

(2,2) 3

An application of standard solid modeling software to draw, dimension, and design mechanical parts and assemblies. Topics covered include: standard drafting techniques, orthographic projections, wireframe and solid methods, Boolean operations, dimensioning, assemblies, and constraining. An introduction to animation of assemblies is also included. Prerequisite: None.

EGME225

Mechanics of Materials I

(3,0) 3

A study of stress analysis and measurements. Topics include axial, shear, torsion, bending stresses, axial strains, shear strains, Poisson's ratio, Hooke's law and the transformation of stresses and strains. Deflection of beams and buckling of columns are also treated. Prerequisite: EGEM220 with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: MATH152.

EGME240

Assembly Modeling and GD&T

(2,3) 3

The course is a continuation of EGME141. Parametric modeling and design of assemblies by the use of solid models. Emphasis will be placed on animation of assemblies to display the functionality of assemblies. Prerequisites: EGME110, 141, and sophomore standing.

EGME275

Engineering Materials

(3,0) 3

A study of the physical structure of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites, as well as their properties and applications. Failure modes of materials, such as corrosion, fatigue, plastic deformation, and brittle failure, are also covered. For metal alloys, there is an emphasis on the interpretation of phase diagrams and time-temperature-transformation diagrams. Prerequisite: CHEM115 or (CHEM108 and CHEM109). Pre- or corequisite: EGME225 or EGMT225.

EGME276

Strength of Materials Lab

(0,3) 1

Laboratory experiments covering topics in mechanics of materials and engineering materials. Theory from mechanics of materials and engineering materials will be covered through hands-on experiments. Pre- or corequisites: EGME225 or EGMT225 and EGME275.

EGME310

Vehicle Development & Testing

(1,2) 2

A course providing a systematic overview of topics within the areas of automotive vehicle dynamics, component design, and testing. An introduction to gross vehicle dynamics is followed by a detailed study of specific vehicle subsystems, including both their design and their role in the overall vehicle behavior. Dynamic behaviors covered include acceleration, braking, cornering, ride, and load transfer. Subsystems considered include the brakes, steering system, suspension, tires, and drive train. Vehicle testing and benchmarking is also covered. Laboratory content includes an introduction to a commercial vehicle dynamics software package. Prerequisites: PHYS221 or PHYS231. Pre- or corequisites: EGEM220 or EGMT225.

EGME312

CAM with CNC Applications

(1,5) 3

Writing CNC programs in machine codes, and the setup and trial runs to produce parts from these programs. Simulation of CNC machining processes to predict tool paths and cycle times. Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) topics and applications of CAM software will also be covered. Prerequisites: EGME110, EGME141.

EGME337

Thermodynamics

(4,0) or (4,0,1) 4

A study of the theory and applications of thermodynamics. Topics covered include: thermodynamic properties, heat, work, first and second Laws of thermodynamics, entropy, power and refrigeration cycles, gas mixtures, and an introduction to transport theory. Prerequisite: MATH152 or MATH112 and EGMT332.

EGME338

Fluid Mechanics

(2,0) 2

A study of theory and applications of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. Topics covered include: Hydrostatic forces, buoyancy forces and stability, Bernoulli equations, dimensional analysis, flow in pipes, integral analysis of fluids, and introduction to pumps. Prerequisites: MATH151 or 112.

EGME339

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

(1,0) 1

A study of the theory and fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Topics covered include: differential analysis of fluids, potential flow, open-channel flow, introduction to gas dynamics, and introduction to computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Prerequisites: EGME338. Pre- or corequisites: MATH310 and MATH251.

EGME350

Machine Design

(3,3) 4

Design and selection of machine components and power transmission units. Selected topics in load, stress, and deflection analysis in more depth than EGME225, notably (but not exclusively) torsion of thin-walled sections, thick-walled pressure vessels, interference fits, buckling problems by eigenvalue analysis, and Castigliano\'s theorems. Deterministic and stochastic theories of static failure, dynamic loading, and fatigue. Performance analyses of machine components, such as shafts, bearings, gears, worms, fasteners, and belt/chain drives. Laboratory covers finite element analysis using commercial software, and involves a major group design project. Prerequisites: EGME141, 225, 275, and 276. Pre-or Corequisite: MATH310.

EGME415

Vehicle Dynamics

(2,0) 2

A study of vehicle dynamics, treating selected topics in automobile dynamics with more theoretical depth than EGME410, but also surveying heavy trucks, tracked and off-road vehicles (including terrain interaction), railway vehicles, and water-borne vessels. Dynamic modeling, as well as a thorough understanding of underlying physical phenomena, are emphasized. Prerequisites: EGEM320, EGNR340 and EGME310.

EGME425

Vibrations and Noise Control

(3,2) 4 or (3,2,1) 4

An introductory course on vibrations analysis, noise control, and acoustics. The vibrations portion includes the theory of discrete and continuous vibrating systems, and such applications as vibration mitigation, machinery vibrations, and rotor dynamics. The noise control/acoustics portion includes the theory of airborne sound, sound fields in bounded spaces, an overview of human hearing, and noise mitigation. Measurement techniques and signal analysis are covered in the laboratory segment. Prerequisites: EGME225, EGEM320, EGNR340, MATH251 and 310.

EGME431

Heat Transfer

(3,0) 3 or (3,0,1) 3

Theory and applications of heat transfer, Steady-state and transient conduction, forced convection, natural convection, radiation. Analysis of heat exchangers, boiling and condensation, introduction to numerical methods in heat transfer. Prerequisites: EGME337, 339 and EGNR265 or EGNR140.

EGME432

Thermal and Fluids Lab

(0,3) 1

Practical applications of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Hands-on training in the operation of thermodynamic components, power generation systems, and fluid mechanical devices. Experimentation in heat transfer. Includes a major project in the area of power generation and dissipation. Prerequisites: EGME337 and 338. Pre- or corequisite: EGME431.

EGME442

Finite Element Analysis

(3,3) 4

This course will cover the fundamentals of finite element analysis. Topics include: Modeling elements, boundary conditions, loading, convergence and an introduction to modal analysis. Commercial software will be used in the laboratory along with 3-D mesh generation. Prerequisites: EGME350 and MATH310.

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EGMF110

EGMF110 Introduction to Machining I

(2,6) 4

Students will receive instructions on shop safety, blueprint reading, measuring instruments, layout principles, and basic bench work. They will also receive instructions on grinding, lathes, drill presses, saws, and basic milling. Some metallurgical concepts are introduced. The course will make use of the Machinery's Handbook and apply the principles, concepts, and data in the handbook to industrially related projects. Information from the handbook will be used to ensure proper set-up and operation of the machinery. Students will spend several hours each week setting up, working, and familiarizing themselves with the machines.

EGMF130

EGMF130 Introduction to Machining II

(2,6) 4

This course builds up upon the material presented in EGMF110. Students will receive additional instruction on shop safety and measuring techniques relative to the machinery introduced in this course. Additional topics on vertical and horizontal milling machines, surface grinders, metallurgy, and blueprint reading are covered. The Machinery's Handbook will continue to be used in conjunction with the machines utilized in this course. Students will spend several hours each week setting up, working, and familiarizing themselves with the machines. Prerequisite: EGMF110.

EGMF210

EGMF210 Advanced Machining

(2,6) 4

In this course, students will write CNC programs in machine codes, and then setup and run CNC machines to produce parts from these programs. Computer software interfacing between programming languages and various industrial machines will be stressed. Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) topics and applications of CAM software will also be covered. Students will be able to describe the sequence and operations for a part program, determine the tools required for machining, calculate speeds and feeds, set-up tooling on CNC machines, develop CNC programs using standardized formats, and use CAM software to produce three dimensional parts. Prerequisites: EGMF110 or EGME110, and MATH102. Pre- or corequisite: EGMF130.

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EGMT142

EGMT142 An Overview of Solid Modeling Techniques

(1,2) 2

This course will cover an application of solid modeling software techniques to create parts and assemblies. Topics covered include creating sketches; creating parts with extrude, revolve, blend, and sweep; creating part features with round, chamfer, pattern, mirror; use of the part history tree; dimensioning of parts; building of assemblies; creation of parts from 2D drawings; creating 2D drawings from solid models of parts and assemblies; and an introduction to animation of assemblies. Prerequisites: Previous CAD course and permission or instructor.

EGMT225

EGMT225 Statics and Strength of Materials I

(4,0) 4

Fundamental concepts of statics and strength of materials. Solutions of problems introducing forces, moments, normal stress, shear stress, bending stress and torsional stress. Theory and application of strain gages. Prerequisites: MATH140 with a C or better grade and PHYS221.

EGMT332

EGMT332 Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer for Technologists

(4,0) 4

This course provides an algebra-based coverage of topics in thermodynamics and heat transfer relevant to technologists in manufacturing and fire science. Thermodynamics topics include properties of substances, energy balances, combustion and thermochemistry, and heating and ventilation systems. Basic principles of conduction, convection, and radiation, and their application to practical problems are covered in the heat transfer portion of the course. Prerequisite: MATH111 or 140.

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EGNR101

Introduction to Engineering

(1,2) 2

An introduction to the different areas of study within the fields of electrical and mechanical engineering. Lecture topics and laboratory activities will introduce computer programming, computer simulation exercises, data-acquisition systems, microcontroller systems, communications, robotic and manufacturing applications, material science and dynamics. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH102.

EGNR102

Concepts and History of Engineering

(2,0) 2

This course provides instruction on problem-solving techniques using engineering tools and concepts as students work on an engineering design project. Topics in engineering ethics and the engineering work experience are discussed. A history of engineering and the development of the specific engineering fields are presented. Pre- or corequisite: MATH102.

EGNR103

Engineering Orientation

(0.5,1) 1

This course provides an orientation to the engineering and engineering technology fields at Lake Superior State University, including robotics. Students are introduced to the engineering professional organizations and are encouraged to participate in professional activities. Laboratory exercises focus on introducing students to the engineering facilities and programmatic options within the engineering and engineering technology disciplines. Academic success strategies are also presented. Pre- or co-requisite: MATH102.

EGNR140

Linear Algebra and Numerical Methods for Engineers

(1,3) 2

This course covers the engineering application of concepts from applied mathematics, iterative programming and numerical methods. Applications of linear algebra and complex numbers are introduced. Iterative programming emphasizes loops, conditional statements and user input-output. Numerical methods topics include root searching methods, numerical integration, and other algorithms involving iterative computations. The lab also includes instruction on commercially-available software used to implement the numerical methods studies. Prerequisite: MATH140 (or high school mathematics that includes two years of algebra, one year of plane geometry, and one-half year of trigonometry and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam). Pre- or corequisite: MATH112 or 151.

EGNR245

Calculus Applications for Technology

(2,2) 3

This course covers engineering applications of differential and integral calculus, including areas, volumes of solids, vector analysis, matrix algebra, polar and cylindrical coordinate systems, partial differentiation, and multiple integrals for typical engineering technology problems. Application and solutions to engineering problems will emphasize and require the use of commercial software packages such as MathCAD and MATLAB. Prerequisite: EGNR140.

EGNR250

Cooperative Education

(2) 2

A practicum in which students work in a supervised engineering capacity (on site) with industry. The student is expected to work at least 6 hours per week in an industrial setting. The student\'s experience must be related to his/her academic studies and thus this experience contributes significantly to his/her professional development. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

EGNR260

Engineering Research Methods

(1,3) 2

This is an introductory course covering research methods in engineering and engineering-related fields. The student will be involved in faculty-supervised and guided research activities such as assisting with developing experiments, gathering data and analyzing results. Much time will be spent learning about the research project, past experiments and future directions. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

EGNR265

C Programming

(3,0) or (3,0,1) 3

An introductory course in \"C\" programming with an emphasis on structured programming techniques and on utilizing \"C\" to solve engineering-related problems. Topics include looping techniques, input and output to files, conditional flow of control, writing and utilizing functions, pointers, 1D and 2D arrays, and data storage. Prerequisites: MATH140 and sophomore standing.

EGNR310

Advanced Quality Engineering

(3,0) 3

Provides an in-depth coverage of classical and modern methods of quality control and quality engineering. Topics include quality control principles and terminology, classical qualitative and quantitative quality control methods, including statistical process control procedures, and robust design methods as applied to product design and design of experiments, and an overview of quality management systems used in industry. Prerequisite: MATH207 or 308.

EGNR340

Advanced Numerical Methods for Engineers

(0,2) 1

This is the second course covering numerical methods in engineering. Topics will include numerical methods for the solution of differential equations used to model and solve engineering problems, as well as numerical algorithms for linear algebra problems, Taylor's series, Fourier analysis and other selected applications. Prerequisites: EGNR140. Pre- or Corequisite: MA310 and CSCI121 or EGNR265.

EGNR346

Probability and Statistics Laboratory for Engineers

(0,2) 1

This laboratory accompanies MATH308, a calculus-based introduction to the basic theory of probability and statistics. Topics include methods of data collection, experimental design, interpretation of data and use of a statistical software tool. Pre- or corequisite: MATH308.

EGNR450

Cooperative Education Project I

(4) 4

A practicum in which students work in a supervised engineering capacity (on site) with industry. This is the first of a two-part sequence that can replace the senior year Engineering Design Project II (EGNR495). The focus of this course is the development of the co-op project proposal and the initiation work on the co-op project. The expectation is that at least 60% of a forty hour work week is devoted to completing the project. Prerequisite: EGNR250 Cooperative Education.

EGNR451

Cooperative Education Project II

(3) 3

A practicum in which students work in a supervised engineering capacity (on site) with industry. This is the second of a two-part sequence that can replace the senior year Engineering Design Project II (EGNR495). The focus of this course is the completion of the co-op project. The documentation at the completion of the project includes an update presentation and a final report/final presentation. The expectation is that at least 60% of a forty hour work week is devoted to completing the project. Prerequisite: EGNR450 Cooperative Education.

EGNR460

Engineering Research Project I

(2,6) 4

This is a senior-level course in which students are actively involved in a faculty-supervised and guided research project. Students will acquire the skills listed under EGNR491 and develop a research plan for some portion of a project. The plan will be implemented in EGNR461. Specifically, the students will work to develop a proposal of the expected research goals and create a project timeline and budget. The student's faculty advisor and the director of the Lab for Undergraduate Research in Engineering (LURE) must approve the plan. Prerequisites: EG260, permission of instructor on the basis of senior status and expected graduation on or before December of the following calendar year. Students who plan to take EGNR461 must complete both EGNR460 and 461 in the same academic year.

EGNR461

Engineering Research Project II

(1,3) 2

This is a senior-level course in which students are actively involved in a faculty-supervised and guided research project. Students implement their research plan developed in EGNR460 and lead research efforts. Results and finding must be reported in oral and/or written forms to appropriate constituencies outside the LSSU audience. Prerequisites: EGNR460 and permission of instructor. The dropping or failing of EGNR461 will result in the student having to repeat both EGNR460 and 461.

EGNR490

Research Topics in Engineering

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in engineering for individuals for small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the department head. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits.

EGNR491

Engineering Design Project I

(2,3) 3

This course provides students with the skills necessary for successful completion of their design project. Topics include group dynamics, ethics, timelines, resource allocation, project management and performance evaluations. Skills in oral and written communications, problem conceptualization, creative problem solving and technical presentations are developed. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor on the basis of senior status and expected graduation on or before December of the following calendar year, and one of the following: EGEE320, 370, EGME350 or (EGRS365 and EGMT310). Students who plan to take EGNR495 must complete both EGNR491 and EGNR495 in the same academic year. Coop students must complete EGNR451 prior to enrolling in EGNR491.

EGNR495

Engineering Design Project II

(1,6) 3

A continuation of EGNR491. This course provides students with the skills necessary for successful completion of their design project. Topics include group dynamics, engineering economics, timelines, resource allocation, project management and performance evaluations. Skills in oral and written communications, problem conceptualization, creative problem solving, and technical presentations are developed. Prerequisite: EGNR491. The dropping or failing of EGNR495 will result in the student having to repeat both EGNR491 and 495.

EGNR496

Senior Directed Project

(1,6) 3

This course is designed to allow industrial technology majors the opportunity to implement a project while working collaboratively with engineering and engineering technology students. Students will be expected to use the skills and knowledge from previous course work. Project outcomes should relate to the student's individual areas of study and represent a synthesis of the previous learning under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Approval of the department chair, senior status, and expected graduation on or before December of the following calendar year.

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EGRS215

Introduction to Robotics

(1,2) 2

An introduction and orientation to the field of robotics. Challenges in robotics manufacturing, design and structure of robotic systems, classification of robots, robot geometry, power sources, robotic control systems are covered in this course. The lab part of the course will provide an overview of robotics applications in industry through videos and hands-on experiences. Applied laboratory topics will cover basic programming concepts, structures, and applications using industrial robots. Prerequisites: MATH102 or equivalent.

EGRS365

Programmable Logic Controllers

(2,3) 3

An introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLC) with an emphasis on programming of the controller and operator interface. Standard PLC devices (bits, timers, counters etc.) and controller functions dealing with math, compare, moves, program flow, analog input, and high-speed counters will be covered in the course. Written and oral business communications are an integral part of the course. Co or prequisites: EGNR265 or EGEE125 or CSCI121 and sophomore status.

EGRS366

Programmable Logic Controllers

(2,2) 3

An introduction to the use of programmable logic controllers (PLC). Basic components of the PLC along with the interface to hydraulic/pneumatic systems and sensors will be discussed. Some higher-level functions such as zone control, master control and sequencers will also be covered. This course will only be offered at the regional sites. It is not a communication-intensive course. Prerequisite: electrical fundamentals course.

EGRS380

Robotics Technology

(2,0) 2

This course will cover topics relative to robotics and robotics systems. Two- and three-dimensional kinematics, end effectors, active and passive collision systems, sensors, feedback devices, robotic safety, and principles of operation of applicable hardware will be studied. Prerequisites: MATH111 and MATH131 with grade of C or better, and PHYS221.

EGRS381

Robotics Technology Lab

(0,3) 1

Laboratory exercises will provide hands-on examples in the use of industrial robots. Focus will be on learning a structured robotics programming language. Applications and projects will simulate industrial situations as well as emphasize system integration. Prerequisites: EGNR265. Corequisite: EGRS380.

EGRS382

Introduction to Robotics Programming

(0,3) 1

The laboratory work will provide an introduction to the use and application of an industrial robot. Programming concepts and structures in the V+ programming language as used in Adept and Staubi robots will be studied. Industry-like applications and system integration projects will be assigned. Prerequisite: EGRS380.

EGRS385

Robotics Engineering

(3,3) 4

An introduction to the field of robotics engineering. Topics include classification of robotic manipulators, accuracy and repeatability, wrists and end-effectors, actuators and sensors, homogeneous transformations, Denavit-Hartenberg convention, forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, trajectory planning and an introduction to velocity kinematics. Laboratory exercises will focus on the operation and programming of industrial robots and robotics simulation using industry standard software. Prerequisites: EGNR265 or CSCI105, and MATH251

EGRS430

Systems Integration and Machine Vision

(3,3) 4

A study of the theory and application of sensors and machine vision in modern manufacturing systems. Topics will include position sensors, encoders, interface electronics, force and torque sensors, LAN, PLC, electrical noise, machine vision, lighting techniques, control software, feature extraction techniques and robot guidance. Prerequisites: MATH152 or EGNR245, EGNR140, EGRS381 or EGRS385, and EGNR265 or CSCI121.

EGRS435

Automated Manufacturing Systems

(2,3) 3

A study and analysis of the components of an automated manufacturing system. Topics include analysis of flow lines, automated assembly systems, MRP, materials requirement planning, production economics and CIM. Course work will include applications of manufacturing systems software including factory simulation. Laboratory work will focus on systems integration, advanced programming of industrial robots, and flow line automation. Prerequisites: EGRS385.

EGRS460

Control Systems

(3,3) 4

An introduction to the analysis and design of linear feedback control systems. The course will include a study of system modeling, block diagrams, system response, stability, steady state error, bode plots and root locus. Laboratory exercises will develop a student\'s ability to design feedback systems and quantify system performance. Prerequisites: MATH310, EGEM220 and EGEE210. Pre- or co-requisite: EGNR340.

EGRS461

Design of Control Systems

(3,3) 4

This course builds upon the fundamental control system theory covered in EGRS460 and introduces various control system design techniques. General topics include Bode and root locus design techniques, controllability and observability, optimal control, state space design. Several classical design techniques such as phase-lead, phase-lag, deadbeat, pole placement and PID design are covered. Prerequisite: EGRS460.

EGRS480

Manufacturing Automation

(3,0) 3

Study of the mathematical modeling of production concepts, analysis of automated flow lines, automated assembly systems, production economics, automated guided vehicles and materials requirement planning. Prerequisites: EGRS380, EGRS381 or EGRS382, and MATH112 or MATH151 with a grade of C or better.

EGRS481

Manufacturing Automation Lab

(0,3) 1

The first part of the laboratory work will focus on programming Fanuc robots using the Karel programming language. Industry-like applications and system integration projects will be assigned. The second part of the lab work will include the application of WITNESS discrete-event simulation software package to study and analyze manufacturing systems. Prerequistes: EGNR265 or CSCI121 either with a grade of C or better. Pre or co-requisite: EGRS480.

EGRS482

Automation and Simulation Lab

(0,3) 1

Laboratory work in automation will focus on programming Fanuc robots using the Karel programming language. Industry-like applications and system integration projects will be assigned. Lab work in simulation will include the introduction to a discrete-event manufacturing simulation software package. Several manufacturing systems will be modeled, verified, validated and optimized using the simulation software package. Prerequisite: EGRS480.

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EMED181

First Aid

(0.5,1.5) 1

Basic course in first aid. Theoretical and practical experience in university laboratory.

EMED189

Medical First Responder

(2,3) 3

This course is designed to teach students the principles of basic life support and emergency care. Topics include patient assessment and handling, airway maintenance, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, bandaging, splinting and spinal immobilization. Management of common environmental and medical emergencies will also be addressed. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to apply for a Michigan Medical First Responder license.

EMED190

Prehospital Emergency Care and Crisis Intervention I

(3,3) 4

Techniques of emergency medical care needed by the emergency medical technician-ambulance attendant. Theoretical and practical experience in administering preliminary emergency care and transportation of sick and injured victims to medical care centers.

EMED191

Prehospital Emergency Care and Crisis Intervention II

(2,6) 4

Simulated practice with some in-hospital observation. Emphasis on laboratory practice of skills needed for functions of an EMT-A. Prerequisite: EMED190.

EMED211

Emergency Pharmacology I

(2,0) 2

Introduction to emergency pharmacology including sources of drugs, drug laws and regulation, routes of administration, pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics, dosage calculations and the metric system. Emphasis will be placed on drugs used in the management of cardiovascular emergencies. Prerequisite: math competency or MATH103, and corequisite EMED251.

EMED212

Emergency Pharmacology II

(2,0) 2

Continuation of HLTH211 with an overview of emergency drugs frequently used in the prehospital management of respiratory, endocrine, toxicological, obstetrical and other prehospital emergencies. Administration procedures and dosages for adult and pediatric patients will be covered. Prerequisite: EMED211 with a B- or above.

EMED251

Advanced Emergency Care I

(4,0) 4

Study of prehospital emergencies geared toward rapid intervention and patient stabilization. Introduction to the pre-hospital environment and preparatory information will be covered including medical-legal issues, airway management, parenteral therapy and comprehensive patient assessment. Management of traumatic injury and multiple casualty incidents will be addressed. Prerequisite: admission to Paramedic Technology Program.

EMED252

Advanced Emergency Care II

(4,0) 4

Continuation of EMED251 addressing treatment modalities for environmental, medical, obstetrical and behavioral emergencies in the adult and pediatric patient. Prerequisite: EMED251 with a B- or above.

EMED261

Emergency Cardiology I

(2,0) 2

Introduction to basic cardiac monitoring and dysrhythmia recognition. Review of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, principles of electrophysiology, EKG interpretation and dysrhythmia management will be covered. Sinoatrial, juncitonal and atrial dysrhythmias will be addressed. Corequisite: EMED251.

EMED262

Emergency Cardiology II

(2,0) 2

Continuation of EMED261 with emphasis directed at identification and management of life-threatening dysrhythmias including ventricular dysrhythmias and heart blocks. Coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular emergencies will be addressed, and the course will conclude with ACLS certification. Prerequisite: EMED261 with a B- or above.

EMED271

Prehospital Emergency Pediatrics

(2,0) 2

This course will prepare the Emergency Paramedic to effectively assess and manage the pediatric patient in the emergency setting. Program material will include differentiation between adult and pediatric anatomy and physiology, assessment of the neonatal and pediatric patient, and management of common medical and traumatic conditions experienced by the pediatric patient. Special emphasis will be placed on topic areas including resuscitation skills, pediatric pharmacology, and the special needs of the patient.

EMED284

Advanced Skills and Situations I

(1,6) 3

Advanced skills and procedures discussed in Advanced Emergency Care will be demonstrated and practiced in a laboratory setting. Skills covered will include advanced airway management, parenteral therapy, cardiac monitoring and advanced patient assessment. Simulated patient scenarios will be designed to allow the student to practice these advanced skills in a realistic patient setting. Emphasis will be placed upon strengthening new skills and providing critical thinking opportunities which allow for the integration of theory with practical applications. Prerequisite: admission to the Paramedic Technology Program and corequisite EMED251.

EMED285

Advanced Skills and Situations II

(1,6) 3

Continuation of HLTH284 with an emphasis placed on ACLS and PALS procedures and algorithms. Instructor and peer evaluation will enhance learning, and working in groups will promote the concepts of teamwork and individual leadership. Prerequisite: EMED284 with a B- or above. Corequisite: EMED252.

EMED286

Paramedic Operations

(1,3) 2

This course will prepare the Emergency Paramedic to effectively handle unique situations which may be encountered in the prehospital setting that require highly specialized training. Program material will include managing multiple casualty situations, Medical Incident Command, hazardous materials incidents, rescue awareness and operations and crime scene awareness. Special emphasis will be placed on rescuer safety. Practical skills will include vehicular entry and disentanglement, and basic rescue operations.

EMED297

Paramedic Clinical I

(0,12) 2

Clinical rotations in the hospital emergency department, surgical suite, outpatient surgery and with local EMS agencies designed to provide the student with hands-on practical experience of patient care. Corequisite: EMED251 and permission of the instructor.

EMED298

Paramedic Clinical II

(0,12) 2

Clinical rotations in the hospital emergency department, intensive care unit, obstetrical unit, pediatrics unit and local EMS agencies will provide the student with a continuation of clinical exposure. Additional clinical experience in other areas may be included as the opportunity permits. Prerequisite: EMED297 with a B- or above and concurrent with EMED252.

EMED299

Paramedic Field Internship

(0,21) 4

This course is a field internship designed to prepare the student to function confidently in the role of the Emergency Paramedic in the prehospital setting, upon completion of the didactic, practical and clinical components of the Paramedic Technology Program. It will also provide the student with an opportunity to develop team leadership skills, and improve existing knowledge and practical skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical thinking skills and independent leadership ability.

EMED301

National Registry Certification Preparation

(2,0) 2

This course is designed to prepare the Paramedic Student to challenge the National Registry Paramedic Certification Examination upon completion of the didactic, practical and clinical components of the Paramedic Technology Program. It will provide the student with an opportunity to thoroughly review key information in the 8 modules of the National Standard Paramedic Curriculum. Emphasis will also be placed on improving the student's test-taking skills.

EMED490

Independent Study for Emergency Medicine

(1-3,0) 1-3

The students may take the form of either a research project of a program of directed reding on a specific subject. One to three credits over a period of one or two semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student's project. May be repeated up to six credits. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.

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ENGL091

Preparation for College Reading and Writing

(3,0) 3

This course focuses on reading and writing by having students take part in a rigorous program of reading that is coordinated with their writing assignments. By reading, and reflecting upon that reading through writing, students are introduced to the kinds of inquiry, analysis, and reporting that are basic to college-level study. A grade of C or higher is required to pass the course. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. All students whose ACT scores do not place them in ENGL110 must receive credit for ENGL091 before taking ENGL110.

ENGL110

First-Year Composition I

(3,0) 3

ENGL110 provides students with an introduction to the discipline of writing through an exploration of their own writing processes and products. Emphasis is placed on students learning to think critically about their own writing in order to address issues of coherence, grammar, mechanics, organization, clarity and content. Other material covered includes the role of literacy in society, the ways in which readers engage text, and the role of writing at the college level. Prerequisites: English ACT score of 18 or a C or higher in ENGL091.--

ENGL111

First-Year Composition II

(3,0) 3

First-Year Composition II prepares students for the complex demands of academic literacy and research. These require students to be able to critically observe personal and public knowledge; ask questions of reading and research; formulate hypotheses; design and conduct research projects, both in the library and in the field; and identify further avenues of inquiry. To help students develop these abilities, the course also teaches students the basic skills of analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and documentation. Required course work includes completion of an extended research project. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in ENGL110.

ENGL180

Introduction to Literary Studies

(3,0) 3

This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of literary study, focusing on three questions: What is a literary text? How do we read a literary text? How do we write about a literary text? Addressing these questions requires students to examine the social and cultural contexts of literature and its aesthetic, rhetorical and ideological aspects. These considerations will help students judge literary value and examine their own literary assumptions. Requires one research project and critical essays using MLA style. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

ENGL221

Introduction to Creative Writing

(3,0) 3

Writing and discussion of art forms such as poetry, fiction and drama consistent with the student's individual interests. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

ENGL222

English Grammar

(3,0) 3

Introduction to the basic Standard English grammar, its vocabulary and its principles as these rules apply to the structure of the sentence and the production of the meaning.

ENGL231

American Literature I

(3,0) 3

This course is a chronological study of American literature from the colonial writers through the Romantic period, ending with the Civil War. Prerequisite: ENGL180.

ENGL232

American Literature II

(3,0) 3

This course is a chronological study of American literature from the Civil War through the present, covering the Age of Realism and the development of twentieth century literature. Prerequisite: ENGL180.

ENGL233

English Literature I

(3,0) 3

Students will read and discuss selected works from the Old English period to the beginning of the eighteenth century. Emphasis will be placed on major writers and works, evaluated in their historical context. Prerequisite: ENGL180.

ENGL234

English Literature II

(3,0) 3

Students will read and discuss selected works from the eighteenth century to the twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on major writers and works, evaluated in their historical context. Prerequisite: ENGL180.

ENGL235

Survey of Native Literature of North America

(3,0) 3

Students will examine various types of Native American literatures, including traditional stories, non-fiction, fiction and poetry from authors of numerous different nations. A variety of themes, including Native American identity and the role of culture in literature, will be covered. Corequisite: ENGL111 (also listed as NATV235).

ENGL236

Literature and Culture

(3,0) 3

Students will examine English-language texts from a variety of cultures, including American minorities and other underrepresented cultures. Students will observe the way in which culture is presented in the texts and how culture can help to shape the texts. Corequisite ENGL111.

ENGL301

Creative Prose Writing

(3,0) 3

This course is a workshop for the study and practice of prose fiction, creative non-fiction, and other prose forms, and requires the completion of a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ENGL221.

ENGL302

Poetry Writing

(3,0) 3

This course is a workshop for the study and practice of poetry, and requires the completion of a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ENGL221.

ENGL303

Performance Writing

(3,0) 3

This course is a workshop for the study and practice of writing for performance, including plays, film scripts, and other performance genres, and requires the completion of a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ENGL221.

ENGL306

Technical Writing

(3,0) 3

Technical writing is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of technical communication. This course incorporates a broad approach, addressing the issues of critical thinking, collaboration, ethics, and the persuasive presentation of technical information in both written documents and oral presentations. The specific documents that will be covered include memos, formal business letters, technical descriptions, short and analytic reports, proposals and formal oral presentations. The central focus of the course will be the completion of a discipline-specific final project, in which the technical communication skills learned during the course will be enhanced. A major goal of this project, and the class, is to introduce students to the demands of their chosen professions, and thereby prepare them for the kinds of disciplined intellectual and practical work they will be required to complete. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

ENGL310

Advanced Writing

(3,0) 3

An exploration of the theory and practice of writing as it relates to the production of text, ENGL310 places emphasis on developing a conscious approach to writing. The course is designed to assist students in gaining control over the choices that create a coherent, precise, cohesive and professional text. This course may be taught on a tutorial basis. Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in ENGL111 and junior standing.

ENGL320

Responding to Writing

(3,0) 3

A course in the theory and practice of effective writing with emphasis on evaluating and responding to writing across the disciplines. Recommended for writing ombudsmen, tutors, education students and other interested students. Course includes rhetorical and linguistic theory, current research on writing as process, theory and practice of responding to student writing, computer-assisted writing and revision, tutorial strategies and characteristics of writing in various disciplines. A strong theoretical framework with student paper examples from interdisciplinary fields.

ENGL321

Rhetoric and Composition Theory

(3,0) 3

A course in the theory of rhetoric and composition. The course takes an historical approach, tracing the growth, uses and transformations of rhetoric from the classical period to the present day, highlighting the major underlying cultural forces which fostered change in rhetoric and fueled the development of composition theory. Emphasis is upon modern rhetoric and composition theory. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

ENGL335

Childrens Literature

(3,0) 3

This course focuses on understanding the historical, cultural, and generic dimensions of children's literature, with emphasis on critical reading, literary analysis, and the selection and evaluation of texts for children and young adults. Pre- corequisites: ENGL111 or COMM101.

ENGL340

Genre Studies

(3,0) 3

This course focuses on an understanding of the formal characteristics, critical interpretation, and the history and development of a single literary genre, including but not limited to the novel, the short story, drama or poetry. Pre-/corequisites: ENGL231/2 or ENGL233/4. Variable topics: may be repeated twice for credit.

ENGL404

Literature Before 1800 (Topic)

(3,0) 3

This course examines a period, movement, theme, or issue in English or American literature before 1800. Emphasis is on ciritical analysis of works of literature, and an understanding of the role of history, society, and culture including, as relevant, cross-cultural affects, on literary production. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits, when topic varies. Prerequisites: ENGL231 or ENGL233.

ENGL408

Literature After 1800 (Topic)

(3,0) 3

This course examines a period, movement, theme, or issue in English and/or American literature after 1800. Emphasis is on critical analysis of works of literature, and an understanding of the role of history, society, and culture including, as relevant, cross-cultural affects, on literary production. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits, when topic varies. Prerequisites: ENGL232 or ENGL234.

ENGL409

Advanced Writing Workshop

(3,0) 3

This course is a workshop for advanced level writing in a variety of genres, with emphasis on students doing sustained work in a chosen genre, and requires the completion of a final portfolio. Prerequisites: Two courses from ENGL301, 302, or 303.

ENGL420

History of the English Language

(3,0) 3

Origin and development of the English language, including its relationship to other Indo-European languages, the history and structure of Old and Middle English, and the rise of modern English. Prerequisites: ENGL222, 233, 234.

ENGL421

History of Literary Criticism

(3,0) 3

An investigation of the history of critical theory to include classicism, neoclassicism, romanticism, the New Critics and contemporary critical trends. Prerequisite: ENGL233-234.

ENGL433

Topics in Literature and Composition

(3,0) 3

Study of various specialized topics in literature and composition not offered as part of the core classes. Topics may include studies of specific authors, theorists, and movements in literature and composition. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing. May be taken twice for credit (total of six credits).

ENGL450

Directed Individual Study

(3,0) 3

Individual study of an author, period, genre or other related topic relevant to literary scholarship. Each student will do extensive research and prepare a paper. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGL480

Creative Writing Portfolio

(3,0) 3

This is a senior-level capstone class requiring students to complete a book-length, unified collection of creative workin chosen genres, working with the instructor on an independent study basis. Prerequisite: ENGL409.

ENGL490

Senior Thesis

(3,0) 3

Senior thesis is a sustained exploration of a literary composition or language topic. Students will undertake an independent research project under the direction of a chosen instructor and develop it into a major paper. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing.

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EVRN131

Introduction to GIS and GPS

(2,2) 3

This course provides a foundation in geographic information systems (GIS) such as data types, cartography, queries, classification, geoprocessing, basic editing, basic raster analysis and map overlay. The theory and operation of GPS receivers and data integration with GIS is covered in multi-week student initiated projects. Prerequisites: None.

EVRN231

Intermediate GIS

(1,3) 2

This course will survey the rapidly growing GIS industry, consider many important principles guiding GIS use and development, and provide the student with hands-on experience. Emphasis will be on geospartial analysis techniques, geodatabase, system design, remote sensing, and provide an introduction to advanced topics. After successfully completing this course, students should come away with a clear understanding of GIS analyses, the issues affecting how a GIS is used (and misused), how to review GIS research, how GIS research is written, and an appreciation for how GIS can contribute to a wide variety of disciplines and research interests. Prerequisites: EVRN131 or equivalent.

EVRN289

Aquatic Research Sampling Methods

(2,3) 3

A variety of sampling techniques are introduced as they relate to the various disciplines of aquatic science. These methods include sampling and preservation of biotic (plankton, fish, bethic invertebrates, DNA, pathogens) and abiotic (water quality, sediments, climate) data. Prerequisites: BIOL107, CHEM108 and 109, MATH111, and permission of instructor. Also listed as BIOL289.

EVRN290

Independent Study in Environmental Science

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in environmental science for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of school dean. Prerequisites: Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no "I" (incomplete) grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the School of Science and Natural Resources.

EVRN311

Environmental Law

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Study of the fundamental concepts of environmental law and ethics. Course includes a survey of the field of environmental ethics and a discussion of ethical issues, a review of the basic legal systems and research techniques, state and federal environmental statutes and codes of conduct for environmental professionals. Extensive use of case studies related to application of environmental law are used to illustrate ethical dilemmas and the approaches for resolving them. Prerequisite: junior standing.

EVRN313

Solid and Hazardous Waste

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Identification and classification of solid and hazardous wastes, including discussion of storage and processing, collection and transportation, resource recovery and recycling and ultimate disposal. Topics on radiation, decay, health effects and sources of hazardous materials will also be covered. Prerequisite: MATH112 or equivalent.

EVRN317

Environmental Health Applications

(3,3) 4

A systems approach addressing the factors that contribute to illness, injury, or death, and that affect the health status of individuals and populations. Topics include: environments within buildings, food sanitation, reacreation facilities, personal services, and community noise and control. The laboratory emphasizes methods of measuring and evaluating environmental health risks as well as field experience. Prerequisite: One semester of chemistry and NSCI103 or permission of instructor.

EVRN325

Geospatial Analysis

(2,3) 3 alternate years

A project-centered course incorporating advanced GIS tools, GPS field work, and data sources for geospatial analysis. This class focuses on a wide range os issues relating to the raster data model, and Digital Elevation Data (DEM) and satellite imagery. The majority of the classwill be devoted to 1) surface derivatives, including slope, aspect, and drainage; 2) modeling; and 3) error and uncertainty. This is a hands-on course, and the student will use a variety of software tools to experience model development, analysis, and visualization. There will be a semester project and a number of mini-projects. Prerequisites: EVRN131 and a 200 level or higher course in statistics.

EVRN341

Environmental Chemistry I

(3,3) 4 alternate years

A study of the environmental chemistry of the hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere, the measurement and remediation of water and air quality problems, the toxicology of water and air pollutants, and the environmental aspects of energy use. Prerequisites: CHEM225 and CHEM226, CHEM231 and NSCI103. Also listed as CHEM341.

EVRN345

Advanced Spatial Analysis and Statistics

(3,3) 4

Spatial statistics differ from traditional statistics in that space and spatial relationships are an integral and implicit component of analysis. The emphasis in this course is analyzing patterns, mapping clusters and identifying geographics distributions. Specific topics include point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation, spatial regression and kriging. Special emphasis will be placed on using the spatial analyst and 3-D analyst extensions tools for ArcGIS. Prerequisites: EVRN131 and a course in statistics.

EVRN355

GIS Programming and Applications

(3,3) 4

This course expands the students' skills regarding object oriented programming and customization of GIS software to extend functionality and automative repetitive tasks. Emphasis will be placed on ArcObjects and object model diagrams. Prerequisites: CSCI105 and EVRN131.

EVRN395

Junior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Literature searching, scientific writing, and oral presentation of scientific data. Students will be expected to listen to presentation of peers enrolled in EVRN/CHEM499 and develop a topic for their senior thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Note: Also listed as CHEM395.

EVRN425

Environmental Systems Analysis

(3,3) 4 alternate years

The basic approach and statistical concerns associated with conducting an environmental analysis, as required for an environmental impact analysis will be integrated with interpretation of data from actual situations. Students will learn how analysis of soil, water, air, plant communities, animal communities and organic tissue analysis can be combined to evaluate the environmental health of a specific site. Discussion of solid, liquid, and hazardous wastes from a macro- and microscopic approach will be included. Prerequisite: CHEM341. Pre- or corequisite: EVRN313.

EVRN450

Laboratory Apprentice

(0,3) per credit 1-2

Students will assist in laboratories, learning instructional techniques, under direction of faculty. Course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Students must gain approval of the faculty member in charge of the specific laboratory, and the department chair. Credits may be used as EVRN electives.

EVRN465

Geographic Databases and Web-based GIS

(3,3) 4

This course introduces database creation and management systems for GIS and the implementation of interactive map services on the Web. Projects are used to develop the student's skills in Web page design, programming, security and Web page management. Topics include database design, SQL, ArcIMS, mobile GIS, and Map Objects. Emphasis is placed on serving maps using ArcIMS software. Prerequisites: EVRN131 and either EVRN231 or CSCI211.

EVRN490

Independent Study in Environmental Science

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in environmental science for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged by student(s) and a supervising professor with approval of school dean. Prerequisites: Students must have junior or senior standing, have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, and no "I"(incomplete) grades on their transcript. Independent study courses may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Additional information is available at the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences office.

EVRN495

Senior Project

(0,6) 2

This is a practicum course in which students, under the guidance of a faculty mentor, conduct a scholarly project mutually agreed upon by the student and his/her faculty mentor. This course will be required for a degree certified by the American Chemical Society. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: EVRN395 (also listed as CHEM395), CHEM231, and CHEM225. Dual listed as CHEM495.

EVRN499

Senior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Required for seniors majoring in chemistry/environmental science. Students will present the results of their scholarly research. Students who have completed EVRN495/CHEM495 will be required to give poster and oral presentations to the Unviersity community as part of this class. Pre- or corequisite: EVRN395 (dual listed as CHEM495). Dual listed as CHEM499.

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EXER105

Program Development and Leadership

(3,0) 3

Principles of leadership skills and styles are applied to various recreation settings with emphasis on group interaction and face-to-face leading. Programming fundamentals for effective leisure services delivery are explored and implemented. Also listed as RECS105.

EXER140

Health and Fitness

(3,0) 3

Introductory course: Theoretical basics of exercise, diet and nutrition and the wellness lifestyle. Topics include aerobic and musculoskeletal fitness, weight control, stress reduction, alcohol and tobacco abuse and presents principles for promoting a wellness lifestyle.

EXER141

Introduction to Movement

(3,0) 3

This course reviews and applies the pertinent aspects of the prerequisite disciplines of anatomy and physiology. Specific attention will be placed on muscles, bones, joint structures, and functions as well as the fundamentals of leverage, balance, and the feel of the movement. A detailed understanding of movement description is the most critical element in the students mastery of the subject matter.

EXER230

Athletic Injury and Illness Prevention

(3,0) 3

This is an introductory class to the field of athletic training. It will provide an overview for the student as to what an athletic trainer does. Topics be included will be a history of athletic training, developing conditioning programs, nutrition, protective equipment in sports, the healing process, emergency plans, injury assessment, psychology of injury, environmental conditions and the use of drugs in sports.

EXER232

Athletic Injury and Illness Recognition and Evaluation

(3,0) 3

This class will be a continuation of EXER230. After a general knowledge base is established in EXER230, EXER232 will elaborate on those concepts and extend them to the various extremities of the body as well as the spine and head. Prerequisites: EXER230 and BIOL122.

EXER234

Preventative Taping Techniques

(0,2) 1

To present current and comprehensive taping and wrapping techniques used in athletic training. Prerequisite: EXER232.

EXER248

Psychology of Sport and Performance and Coaching

(3,0) 3

A review of the psychological aspects related to success in sport and athletics. Emphasis will be placed on presenting techniques for improving individual and team athletic performance, as well as consideration of the psychological aspects of coaching. Specific topics will include personality and sport, attention/anxiety/arousal regulation, motivational techniques, the aggression-performance relationship, and the development of team cohesion and leadership.

EXER262

Exercise Physiology I

(3,0) 3

Introduction to biological energy systems and support systems involved in physical activity and exercise. Emphasis on energy system recruitment dynamics, acute and chronic adaptations to training, and applications to programs employing physically based activities. Prerequisites: BIOL121 and CHEM104 or 115.

EXER265

Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning

(3,0) 3

This course will enable the student to develop knowledge and expertise in the components of sport-related fitness. Specifically, strength training, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, reaction time, speed and agility will be explored in both traditional and non-traditional sports. Emphasis will be placed on the implementation and measurement of the above sport-related fitness components and the design of a strength training and conditioning program for the purpose of enhancing athletic performance.

EXER268

Fitness Evaluation I: Field Tests

(1,2) 2

Provides theoretical background and measurement concepts specific to field tests employed in exercise science settings. Emphasis on skill, development and interpretation of results relative to normative data. Prerequisites: BIOL121 and EXER140.

EXER275

Nutrition for Sport and Exercise Performance

(2,0) 2

Extends the basic principles of nutrition presented in EXER262 and explicitly details the role of the major nutrients in their application to wellness and fitness settings, as well as athletic performance. Specifically addresses the interaction of diet and exercise in modifying the condition of the individuals with metabolic dysfunction (diabetes, obesity) or compromised cardiovascular health (hypertension, coronary heart disease). Also examines the special nutritional needs of athletes and the effectiveness of ergogenic aids in enhancing sport performance. Prerequisites: BIOL121 and EXER262.

EXER295

Practicum

(1-2,0) 1-2

Practical experiences that explore various types of work setting in exercise science, working under specialist in the various chosen areas of interest. May be repeated for a total of four credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EXER301

Athletic Training Clinical Experience I

(0,4) 2

This course requires athletic training students to acquire, practice and demonstrate competency in basic clinical skills necessary to provide healthcare to a physically active population in a variety of clinical settings. Prerequisites: junior status and admission to the Athletic Training Education Program.

EXER302

Athletic Training Clinical Experience II

(0,4) 2

In this course, athletic training students are required to continue acquiring, practicing and demonstrating competency of the basic clinical skills necessary to provide healthcare to a physically active population in a variety of clinical settings. Prerequisites: EXER301 with a grade of C or better.

EXER340

Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training

(2,2) 3

This course will introduce the student to the theory and application of physical medicine devices commonly used in athletic training and sports medicine settings. Specific attention will be placed on the use of cryotherapy, thermotherapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, traction, intermittent compression, and therapeutic massage in caring for physical injuries and illness. This course will focus on determining the most effective therapeutic modality for a given situation and the correct application of the selected therapeutic modality. This course is designed to present the knowledge, skills and values an entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess to plan, implement, document and assess the efficacy of therapeutic modalities in the care of physical injuries and illnesses. Prerequisites: EXER232 and BIOL122.

EXER344

Kinesiology

(3,0) 3

Science of movement applied to muscle, joint structure and function and application of physical laws of gravity, leverage, motion and balance to human performance. Video tape motion analysis is used to apply these theories into practical experience. Prerequisite: EXER141.

EXER346

Therapeutic Exercise in Athletic Training

(2,2) 3

EXER346 will introduce the student to the theory and application of commonly used rehabilitative exercises in the field of athletic training. Students will be introduced to the \"10 Goals of Rehabilitation,\" and will then study the relationship that therapeutic exercise plays in the attainment of each goal. Students will then develop a comprehensive rehabilitation plan that will enable a physically active person to return to activity as safely as possible. Students will be exposed to current surgical techniques and the rehabilitation that is involved. Prerequisite: EXER262.

EXER348

Fitness Evaluation II Laboratory Procedures

(2,2) 3

Provides theoretical background and technical aspects specific to laboratory procedures employed in clinical exercise science settings. Emphasis on developing skills with instrumentation for assessing cardiac activity, respiratory functioning, metabolic dynamics, anthropometer, and administering exercise protocols for diseased populations. Prerequisites: EXER268 and 262.

EXER349

Orthopedic Assessment in Sports Medicine

(3,0) 3

Provides a clear, concise process of physical examination of the spine and extremities which would direct the student in a logical, efficient and thorough search of anatomy relevant to the field of sports medicine. This course will allow the student to continue to build a solid foundation in anatomy specific to orthopedic education. Prerequisites: EXER230 and 232.

EXER358

Research Methods in Exercise Science

(3,0) 3

Introduction to research methods and related statistical procedures for constructing and analyzing research activities. Presentation of statistical concepts including correlation, t-tests and analysis of variance and their use in exercise science. Introduction to measurement concepts of validity and reliability and the facets of writing a research report. Prerequisites: MATH207 and EXER262.

EXER362

Exercise Physiology II

(3,0,) 3

Extends the study of the physiological aspects of exercise by examining advanced topic areas. Specific topics covered are the endocrine system and exercise, effects of exercise on the immune system, exercise and altitude, exercise and thermal stress, as well as exercise physiology concerns of various clinical populations. Prerequisites: BIOL122, CHEM115 and EXER262.

EXER390

Recreation Leader Apprenticeship

(1,0) 1

Practical experience in learning to teach and lead various recreation experiences. Students serve with qualified instructors. Prerequisite: Basic skills and knowledge of activity and instructor permission. May be repeated for a total of three credits.

EXER401

Athletic Training Clinical Experience III

(0,4) 2

In this course, athletic training students continue to demonstrate an integration of risk management skills, assessment skills, and therapeutic rehabilitation skills into the health care of a physically active population in a variety of clinical settings. Prerequisite: EXER302 with a grade of C or better.

EXER402

Athletic Training Clinical Experience IV

(0,4) 2

In this course, athletic training students continue to demonstrate an integration of risk management skills, assessment skills, therapeutic rehabilitation skills and administrative skills into the healthcare of a physically active population in a variety of clinical settings. Prerequisite: EXER401 with a grade of C or better.

EXER428

Psychological Aspects of Exercise and Athletic Rehabilitation

(3,0) 3

The acute and chronic psychological consequences that occur as a result of involvement in physically based activities will be examined as they apply to recreational exercisers and sport enthusiasts, as well as individuals with health problems. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the theoretical background for specific topic areas and investigating the support for these theories by examining original research reports on the effects of exercise and rehabilitation on adherence, chronic pain, anxiety, depression and sport injury. Prerequisites: EXER262 and 358.

EXER434

Neurological Basics of Motor Learning

(3,0) 3

An overview of how the neurological system integrates external stimuli and internal processes in the effective control of movement. Introduced are control systems, attention processes, memory, and the role of feedback and practice on motor learning. Prerequisites: BIOL122, EXER344 and 362.

EXER440

Exercise Physiology Seminar

(2,0) 2

Examines current issues in the field and students will prepare and present advanced physiological concepts related to special topics.

EXER442

Electrocardiography in Exercise Science

(2,0) 2

Examines electrophysiological basis of ECG, cardiac anatomy and metabolism responses to rest and exercise. Prerequisite: EXER262 with a C grade or better.

EXER444

Exercise Prescription

(2,0) 2

Provides experience in writing and developing advanced training and conditioning programs for a variety of populations. Process oriented; considers needs analysis and cyclic training.

EXER446

Exercise Prescription and Testing for Special Populations

(3,0) 3

This course provides a framework for developing exercise programs for individuals with disease, disabilities, or special health issues. The course will focus on exercise prescription through management of problems created by disease of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and immunological systems. It includes a review of the basic principles of exercise testing and exercise prescription and builds on that foundation. Also covered are methods for assessment of functional capacity of individuals with the most common health conditions presented to exercise scientists. This course fits with the new Registry for Clinical Exercise Physiologists and the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines and will provide students with the necessary skills and knowledge for employment in a clinical setting. Prerequisites: EXER358 and 444.

EXER450

Philosophy of Human Performance and Leisure

(3,0) 3

A study of the origins and development of leisure behavior, sport, athletics and personal fitness across cultures. Ethical issues such as violence, opportunity, exploitation, role models and equity will be examined. Prerequisites: EXER262 or RECS101 and junior status.

EXER452

Allied Health Administration

(3,0) 3

This course is intended to enhance the administra-tive ability of allied health professionals. Students will learn to apply current management theories to administrative problems they may face. This will allow entry level allied health professionals the ability to craft creative solutions to administrative problems. Content in this course includes management strategies for the following: Program offerings, finances, human resources, facilities, information, insurance, and legal considerations. Prerequisites: EXER230 and junior standing.

EXER481

Professional Development Seminar

(1,0) 1

Opportunities for students to refine personal and professional goals and initiate preparation of resumes and interviewing skills. Career planning and placement will be emphasized as well as internship evaluation. Seminar format. Prerequisite: Senior status required.

EXER492

Internship

6

Comprehensive practical application of students formal academic preparation. Prerequisite: Junior status and instructor permission.

EXER496

Selected Research Topics

(1-3,0) 1-3

Student carries out approved project(s) of his/her own initiative. Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor permission.

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FINC242

Personal Finance

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the principles of personal financial planning. Topics include the financial planning process, credit and borrowing fundamentals, analysis of savings, investments and taxes, individual insurance, retirement and estate planning. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

FINC245

Principles of Finance

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the principles of business finance. Topics include math of finance, working capital management, financial planning and forecasting, debt and leasing, common and preferred stock, leverage and capital structure, capital budgeting, cost of capital. Students with credit in FINC341 may not enroll in this course. Prerequisites: ACTG132, 230, or OFFC119, and MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

FINC248

Real Estate

(3,0) 3

A study of the basic principles of real estate practice. Coverage includes broker-agent relationships, real estate marketing, real estate law, financing, appraising, taxation and math. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

FINC341

Managerial Finance

(4,0) 4

The nature and scope of financial management including math of finance, financing instruments, leverage and capital structure, financial planning and forecasting, risk and return analysis, capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ACTG133 and BUSN211.

FINC443

Insurance

(4,0) 4

A study of the financial, legal and social aspects of the insurance industry with emphasis on risk and actuarial analysis, insurance institutions and operations, insurance contracts and policies including life, annuity, health, property, liability, group, business and governmental coverages. Financial planning worksheets are utilized to appropriate policy selection. Prerequisites: BUSN350 and MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

FINC446

Financial Analysis and Policy

(4,0) 4

An analytical study of long- and short-term financial policy and strategy through case problems. Selected readings in financial theory supplement the case studies. Prerequisite: FINC341.

FINC448

Investment Strategy

(4,0) 4

A study of investment media and securities markets, risk and return analysis, valuation theory, portfolio construction and investment mechanics. Prerequisite: FINC341.

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FINE405

Independent Project

(3,0) 3

Under the direction of an appropriate supervisor, the fine arts studies student will prepare and create a project within the scope of the student's principal continuations. The project will normally integrate or synthesize aspects of the fine arts; however, its precise nature will be a matter for discussion and approval by the faculty supervisor. The project will be concluded by an appropriate presentation and written report. Prerequisites: fine arts studies major and senior standing. Must be taken both fall and spring semesters for a total of six credits.

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FIRE101

Introduction to Fire Science

(3,0) 3

Survey of the history and philosophy of fire protection. Examines present fire protection problems and future challenges, public fire protection agencies, firefighting equipment and extinguishing agents. Special emphasis is placed on emergency responders' safety and hazardous material recognition.

FIRE102

Wildland and Rural Fire Control

(3,0) 3

Class will provide the theory and practical instruction necessary to manage and control wildland fires. Prevention, back burns, grid references, fuels, firefighting methods and tactics are covered in the course. Select students may earn their "red card" which provides United States Forest Service certification.

FIRE111

Hazardous Materials

(3,0) 3

Principles of combustion; examination of theoretical and practical aspects of combustion. Investigation of physical and chemical properties of substances which may harm responders, the general public and the environment.

FIRE197

Physical Fitness for Public Safety

(0,3) 1

This course provides physical fitness and skills necessary for the law enforcement and fire science certification students. Fire science students take the course semester before FIRE220.

FIRE201

Fire Protection Construction Concepts

(3,0) 3

Impact of building construction concepts and methods on firefighting tactics and strategy, decision making and safety. Presentation of the ramifications of hostile fire on construction and building materials.

FIRE204

Fire Protection Hydraulics and Pumps

(3,0) 3

The application of mathematics and physics laws to properties of water, force, pressure and flow velocities. Emphasis: Applying principles of hydraulics to fire protection problems, use of water supply sources and needs; examines fire department apparatus testing, inspection and maintenance; deals with apparatus specifications and requirements. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or placement exam and FIRE101 or 102, or BIOL102, 140 or 286 as a pre- or corequisite.

FIRE206

Fire Protection Systems, Equipment and Industrial Fire Protection

(3,0) 3

Use and water supply needs of sprinkler and stand pipe systems and devices, fixed detection and control systems and devices, fire department testing, inspection and maintenance. Alarm centers, warning devices and safety considerations are covered along with fire flow calculations and risk assessment. Examination of fire and lifestyle hazards in business and industry. Emphasis on managing fire prevention and training private fire brigades. Prerequisites: FIRE101, 111, 204 and MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or placement exam.

FIRE211

Tactics and Strategy

(3,0) 3

Utilization of manpower, equipment and apparatus on the fireground. Emphasis: Pre-fire planning, fire ground decision making. Implementing tactics and disaster planning. Students will use fire simulation programs and interactive technology to apply and implement the principles covered in didactic instruction. Prerequisite: Either FIRE101 or 102 and 204 as a pre- or corequisite.

FIRE219

Firefighter Essentials

(3,0) 3

This course is the first part of a two class sequence; the second part of the sequence is FIRE220. This course will cover the principles of firefighting attack skills through the practical instruction and exercises as outlined by the Michigan Firefighters Training Council (MFFTC). This course introduces the student to the application of the principles of fire attack and strategy for Firefighter I certificate and portions of Firefighter II through the use of exercises and computer-generated simulations. Hazmat incident analysis and other major disaster case studies are used in this class. Prerequisites: FIRE101 and 111. Corequisites: FIRE197, 204, and 206. Completion of special medical examination.

FIRE220

Fire Science Certification

(3,3) 4

An application of the principles of fire attack and strategy through the use of exercises and computer-generated simulations. Hazmat incident analysis and other major disaster case studies are used in this class. Prerequisites: FIRE101, FIRE111, FIRE197 and FIRE204. Corequisites: FIRE206 and FIRE211. Completion of specialized medical examination.

FIRE301

Code Enforcement Inspection and Fire Prevention

(3,0) 3

An introduction to fire inspection procedures and inspection techniques as related to building construction, fire load, fire protection systems, plans and the storage of hazardous materials. A study of safety code enactment, formulations and its relation to fire prevention and public education efforts and responsibilities of the fire service. Prerequisites FIRE111, FIRE206 and junior standing.

FIRE312

Hazardous Materials Management

(3,3) 4

Covers requirements of federal law dealing with hazardous incidents, waste management with reference to OSHA, NIOSH, NFPA, and ACGIH standards. This class can certify select students at the level of general hazard awareness, emergency response operations, and hazardous waste worker. Prerequisites: FIRE111 or CHEM116 and junior standing.

FIRE315

Company Level Supervision and Management

(3,0) 3

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of supervision and administration skills necessary to function as a company officer, which would include but not be limited to planning, budgeting, time management, training, emergency incident command, and facility maintenance and care. Pre- or corequisites: FIRE101, FIRE111, FIRE204, FIRE206 and FIRE211.

FIRE325

Homeland Security and Emergency Services

(3,0) 3

This course will prepare all graduates from a variety of majors to understand how homeland security impacts the US political system as a whole, but especially from the standpoint of emergency response and preparedness. Investigates the impact of the federal, homeland security apparatus on emergency response organizations at the state and local level. Includes a historical review of \"homeland security\" measures beginning in WWI and through WWII and the Korean War. Especially reviews the security situation during the Cold War. The course deals with the federal agencies usually not associated with homeland security, such as DEA, ATF, the military departments, FAA, CDC, the National Guard Bureau, and the DOD. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Students from other majors are encouraged to enroll with permission of instructor. Also listed as CJUS325.

FIRE401

Senior Seminar

(3,0) 3

Seminar and independent study course with individual student guidance by faculty on selected research topics in fire science. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

FIRE402

Fire Service and the Law

(3,0) 3

Capstone course. Introduces the judicial system in which the fire service operates. Covers civil action, liability, labor, prevention, safety (OSHA), and environmental law. Prerequisite: Senior level standing.

FIRE403

Fire Science Internship

3-9

Fire science internship with an agency. Credit is based on 34 hours of field work per credit hour. Students must make application by the ninth week of the previous semester. Prerequisites: FIRE220 and senior standing.

FIRE490

Independent Study for Fire Science

(1-4) 4

This may take the form of either a research project or a program of directed reading on a specific subject. One to four credits over a period of one or two semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student\'s project. May be repeated up to six credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

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FREN151

First Year French I

(4,0) 4

An introductory course designed to develop the four basic language skills of understanding, reading, speaking and writing, as well as the fundamentals of grammar. A conversational and cultural approach based on everyday life situations from the Francophone world. Basic information in English with progressive emphasis put on the use of French in class.

FREN152

First Year French II

(4,0) 4

Continuation of FREN151 with further acquisition of syntax, grammar and culture with increased emphasis on speaking, reading and writing. As course progresses and the use of French becomes almost dominant in class, basic conversation and composition practice based on increased cultural awareness becomes more elaborate and refined. Prerequisite: FREN151 or equivalent.

FREN251

Second Year French I

(4,0) 4

A course designed to help students further and complete their mastery of basic spoken and written French. Review and completion of grammar information. Systemic conversation practice based on more-advanced readings dealing with current social issues within a broad historical and cultural context, as well as a more-elaborate practice of composition writing. Course largely taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN152 or equivalent.

FREN252

Second Year French II

(4,0) 4

Continuation of FREN251 with further emphasis on oral presentations, general conversation practice and writing of compositions, essays, reports and letters. Development of a more mature use of syntax, grammar and idioms within a broader cultural context which includes a first approach to French literature. Initiation to the basic principles of translation and interpretation. Course almost completely taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN251 or equivalent.

FREN351

Advanced Conversation and Composition I

(3,0) 3

Extensive reading, debating and writing related to contemporary issues within the Francophone world as they are expressed in books, films, newspapers and television. Further practice of translation and interpretation. Preparation to the examination for the DELF (Dilome Elementaire de Langue Francaise) of the French Ministry of Education. Prerequisite: FREN252 or equivalent.

FREN352

Advanced Conversation and Composition II

(3,0) 3

Continuation of FREN351 and systemic practice to the examination for the DELF. Prerequisite: FREN351 or equivalent.

FREN353

Business French I

(3,0) 3

An initiation into the language skills for use in business situations in a French-speaking environ-ment. A conversational approach is used with systematic oral and written practice from authentic documents. Preparation to the examination leading to the Certificat Pratique from the Chamber of Commerce of Paris. May be taken concurrently with FREN351. Prerequisite: FREN252 or equivalent.

FREN354

Business French II

(3,0) 3

Continuation of FREN353. Aims to bring students to a level of proficiency in French business communication that would enable them to function in an internship situation. Visits to French-speaking companies. Further preparation to the examination leading to the Certificat Pratique from the Chamber of Commerce of Paris. May be taken concurrently with FREN352. Prerequisite: FREN353 or equivalent.

FREN355

Survey of French Literature I

(3,0) 3

A chronological study of French literature from its origins to the 18th century. Emphasis on the development and continuity of ideas and their evaluation within the political, social and religious framework of the time, their influence on evolution of language and literature. Text analysis and discussion. May be taken concurrently with FREN351. Prerequisite: FREN252 or equivalent.

FREN356

Survey of French Literature II

(3,0) 3

Continuation of FREN355. Study of major works of French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Text analysis and discussion. May be taken concurrently with FREN352. Prerequisite: FREN252 or equivalent.

FREN360

French Cultural Perspectives

(4,0) 4

This course takes place in France as students participate in a study tour with their instructor. They discover Paris, its monuments, art galleries, museums and libraries; visit ancient Roman vestiges, cathedrals of the Middle Ages and chateaux of the Renaissance, as well as actively participate in French everyday life. However, alternate on-campus version of this course on contemporary French society and culture is offered to students who do not wish to travel to France. Extensive literary, historical and audio-visual documentation provide material for stimulation analysis and discussion of typical French value orientations, family structures, educational, and cultural institutions. Assignments in French or English. Offered summers only. No prerequisite.

FREN370

The Francophone World I

(4,0) 4

This course conducted in English is designed to provide information and help understand the people of French-speaking Africa, French West Indies, South-East Asia and Polynesian Islands. It consists in a study of colonial and post-colonial history, culture and society in these different parts of the world. Participation of native guest speakers with extensive use of audio-visual materials will richly enhance participation and discussion. Prerequisite: junior standing.

FREN460

Directed Academic and Cultural Immersion

(6,1) 6

This multi-faceted course, which takes place in a French-speaking environment, allows students to reach oral and written fluency in language as well as advanced knowledge in a broad variety of areas directly related to French life and civilization. Upon completion of a specific number of courses chosen in consultation with their advisor, students will be granted upper division credits towards completion of their major requirements. Prerequisite: completion of two 300-level French courses at LSSU.

FREN490

Independent Study in French

(1-4)

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of eight credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

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GEOG106

Physical Geography: Landforms

(3,2) 4

Introduction to the description and distribution of landforms with emphasis on lithospheric, hydrospheric and atmospheric relationships. Natural (physical) science credit given. Prerequisite: Completion of mathematics competency graduation requirement. Credit for both GEOG106 and NSCI107 not permitted.

GEOG108

Physical Geography: Meteorology & Climatology

(3,2) 4

Introduction to earth-sun relationships, maps and elementary principles of atmospheric science. Natural (physical) science credit given. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam. Credit for both GEOG108 and NSCI105 not permitted.

GEOG201

World Regional Geography

(4,0) 4 alternate years

A study of the physical environment, resources, past and present economic development, population distribution and historical development of Europe, Asia, the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and North America.

GEOG302

Economic Geography

(4,0) 4 alternate years

A study of the internal and external inter-relationships of the various economic groupings of the world; i.e. North America, Europe and the emerging third world.

GEOG306

Cultural Geography

(3,0) 3

A study of the relationship of environment, culture and adaptive patterns; i.e., socio-economic development. A special emphasis will be placed upon the current problems associated with food supplies, shortages and third world development.

GEOG321

Geography of Europe and Great Britain

(4,0) 4 alternate years

A study of the physical, cultural and economic interdependence of the western European community. Special emphasis will be placed upon the role of the EEC in world economic development. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG322

Geography of South America, Central America and the Caribbean Region

(4,0) 4 alternate years

The study of the geographical features and cultural history of the major regions in South America, Central America and the Caribbean with special concern for their 20th century development. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG323

Geography of East and Southeast Asia

(4,0) 4 alternate years

The study of the geography of Japan, China, Korea, Southeast Asia and India with special emphasis on the impact of the major religions, regional rivalries and 20th century development. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG325

Regional Geography of North America

(4,0) 4 alternate years

The study of the physical, cultural and economic development of various regions of Canada and the United States with special emphasis on the development of regional characteristics and cultural traditions. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG360

Historical Geography of Eastern North America

(4,0) 4 alternate years

A study of the impact of the physical features upon the historical development of eastern Canada and the eastern regions of the United States. Special attention will be given to the western migration patterns. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG490

Independent Study in Geography

(1-4) 1-4

Special topics such as regional, historical, economic, urban, cultural or physical geography. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated up to a total of 12 credits.

GEOG492

Individualized Studies in Geography

(2-4,0) 2-4

This is designed to provide an opportunity for specialized study of issues, problems and selected topics in geography. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

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GEOL115

Field Excursions in Earth Science

(2,4) 4

A field- and project-based educational experience in which aspects of geology, including environmental geology, earth resources, tectonic processes and the interrelationships among geology and other natural sciences, will be addressed. Travel destinations will include regions with unique natural history. Credit can be earned for only one of NSCI102, GEOL115 and 121.

GEOL121

Physical and Historical Geology I

(3,2) 4

The study of processes and features of the rocks and surficial materials that form the Earth's crust. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamic earth including volcanoes, plate tectonics, geologic time, catastrophic events such as earthquakes, and natural resources and their impact on society. The class requires student projects and emphasizes active problem-solving. Laboratory exercises involve minerals, rocks, topographic and geologic maps. Credit can be earned for only one of NSCI102, GEOL115 and 121.

GEOL122

Physical and Historical Geology II

(3,2) 4

The study of surficial processes and landforms in the context of their historical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on evolution of the earth; stratigraphic principles, tectonic framework of North America; landforms and depositional environments; climate, weathering, surficial processes, and sea level changes; and significant events in the history of plants and animals. Laboratory exercises involve geologic maps, invertebrate paleontology, and surficial processes including envrionmental applications. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL121 or NSCI102 or GEOL115.

GEOL218

Structural Geology and Tectonics

(3,6) 5

A study of the deformation of the Earth through a project-centered approach that focuses on actual tectonic problems. Emphasis will be placed on descriptive, kinematic and dynamic analysis of geologic structures, deformation mechanisms and the evolution of each in the context of the regional and global geology. Prerequisite: GEOL122.

GEOL223

Mineralogy and Petrology

(3,6) 5

A laboratory course emphasizing hand-sample techniques for identification of minerals and rocks. Major topics include: physical properties, crystalline structure, and chemical composition of minerals, classificiation of minerals and rocks; origins of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; plate tectonic occurrence of minerals and rock assemblages; and societal and economic significance of minerals and rocks. Prerequisite: GEOL121 or NSCI102. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL122 and CHEM115.

GEOL290

Independent Study in Geology

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in geology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the school chair. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

GEOL315

Geoenvironmental Systems

(3,6) 5 alternate years

The study of environmental issues in a geological context through local and regional field projects. Projects will examine issues such as flooding, shoreline erosion, slope stability, groundwater resources and contamination, and the environmental impact of mineral and energy resource extraction. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of environmental issues through the application of geological and geophysical field data such as collecting and analyzing sediments, bedrock and sediment mapping, and well log analysis. Prerequisites: GEOL218 and GEOL223.

GEOL318

Tectonic Systems

(3,6) 5 alternate years

Study of tectonic process and how these processes affect the earth and its evolution with time. A variety of modern and ancient tectonic settings will be studied through projects and case studies. The deformational, geochemical, sedimentological and geophysical characteristics of individual tectonic settings will be evaluated and their evolution with time will be analyzed. Weekend field trips may be required. Prerequisites: GEOL218 and 223.

GEOL323

Geochemical Systems

(2,6) 4 alternate years

The study of high-temperature igneous, metamorphic, and hydrothermal processes in the context of their global tectonic settings. Topics include the origin and evolution of magmas, igneous crystallization and emplacement processes, hydrothermal reactions and ore deposits, the thermodynamics of metamorphic reactions, and tectonic environments in which these processes occur. A pre-semester one-week field trip and weekend field trips may be required. Prerequisites: GEOL218 and GEOL223.

GEOL325

Clastic Systems

(2,6) 4 alternate years

The study and interpretation of siliciclastic sediments and environments based on stratigraphic principles. Topics include clastic transport and fluid flow, sedimentary structures, lithostratigraphy, facies recognition and relationships, depositional models, diagenesis, stratigraphic diagrams and maps, and tectonics and sedimentation. A pre-semester one-week field trip and weekend field trips may be required. Prerequisites: GEOL218 and GEOL223.

GEOL380

Introduction to Field Geology

(0,9) 3

Introduction to field methods in geology including measurement of sections, mapping techniques, and field interpretation of outcrops. A variety of geologic provinces and environments will be examined. A supply and travel fee will be charged. Prerequisites: GEOL218 and GEOL223.

GEOL410

Engineering Geology

(3,2) 4

This course examines rock types and stratigraphy, geological structures, surface processes, earth materials and methods of geological investigation in the context of behavior of soils and rocks as related to planning and construction. The course includes coverage of in-situ investigations including shallow geophysical methods and emphasizes environmental applications and concerns. Prerequisites: MATH112 or 151, CSCI101 or 111, PHYS221 or 231.

GEOL411

Hydrologic Systems: Surface and Groundwater

(3,3) 4 alternate years

The study of hydrologic systems with an emphasis on land surface and groundwater hydrology. Topics include global climate and the hydrologic cycle, precipitation, snow processes, soil water flow, evapotranspiration, groundwater flow, groundwater-surface interactions, and steam hydraulics. Laboratory components will provide experience in hydrologic field techniques, numerical modeling, and independent research. Prerequisites: PHYS221 or 231.

GEOL431

Geophysical Systems

(3,6) 5 alternate years

The study of geologic, geophysical, and environmental problems using magnetic, electromagnetic, resistivity, gravity, and seismic geophysical techniques. Projects will involve geophysical and geologic survey design, data collection, data processing, and data interpretation and will require the integration of geophysical and geological data to solve problems. A pre-semester one-week field trip and weekend field trips may be required. Prerequisite: GEOL218. Pre- or corequisites: MATH112 or MATH151 and PHYS221 or PHYS231.

GEOL445

Carbonate Systems

(3,6) 5 alternate years

The study and interpretation of carbonate sediments and environments based on stratigraphic principles. Topics include biostratigraphy, facies characteristics and relationships, depositional models, diagenesis, stratigraphic diagrams and maps, and invertebrate paleontology. Weekend field trips may be required. Prerequisites: GEOL122, GEOL218 and one GEOL course at the 300 level or above.

GEOL450

Geology Seminar I

(1,3) 2 alternate years

Study, discussion, and laboratory experience in specialized topics in geology. Students will collect and compile information, write papers, make presentations, and lead discussions. Prerequisite: Two GEOL courses at the 300 level or above.

GEOL451

Geology Seminar II

(1,3) 2 alternate years

Study, discussion, and laboratory experience in specialized topics in geology. Students will collect and compile information, write papers, make presentations, and lead discussions. Prerequisite: Two GEOL courses at the 300 level or above.

GEOL480

Advanced Field Geology

(0,9) 3 alternate years

Three weeks of advanced field methods in geology including field mapping of deformed rocks, construction of cross sections, and interpretation of depositional and deformational histories. A variety of geologic provinces and environments will be examined. A supply and travel fee will be charged. Prerequisites: GEOL380 and one additional GEOL course at the 300 level or above.

GEOL490

Research Topics in Geology

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in geology for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the school chair. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher.

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GRMN141

First Year German I

(4,1) 4

Introduction to basic German grammar and vocabulary, acquainting the students with minimum essentials of oral and written German. Reading of German texts.

GRMN142

First Year German II

(4,1) 4

Further study of German grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on oral expression. Reading of various materials in German with aim of enlarging the student's vocabulary and improving understanding of the language. Prerequisite: GRMN141 or equivalent.

GRMN241

Second Year German I

(4,1) 4

Review of basic German grammar; study of vocabulary, idiom, and word formation to improve reading and conversational abilities. Prerequisite: GRMN142 or equivalent.

GRMN242

Second Year German II

(4,1) 4

Reading and discussion of more advanced German literary materials; conducted as much as possible in German. Emphasis on spoken language. Prerequisite: GRMN241 or equivalent.

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HIST101

History of World Civilization I

(4,0) 4 fall

A study of world civilization from earliest time through the baroque.

HIST102

History of World Civilization II

(4,0) 4 spring

A study of world civilization from the baroque to the present.

HIST131

United States History I

(4,0) 4 fall

A study of United States history from the colonial settlement to the end of the American Civil War in 1865.

HIST132

United States History II

(4,0) 4 spring

A study of United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present.

HIST201

Classical World and Medieval Europe

(4,0) 4 on demand

A survey of Mediterranean civilization from the Bronze Age to the eve of the Renaissance.

HIST202

Renaissance, Reformation and Baroque Europe

(4,0) 4 on demand

A study of the political, institutional, religious, social, economic and cultural developments from 1400 to 1700.

HIST203

Chinese Cultural Diversity

(3,0) 3 summer

Designed for students interested in the diversity of Chinese culture and study abroad. Taught in English and offered at a partner university in China during the first summer session. This four-week course explores, but is not limited to, the traditional social values, classes, divergences, ethnicity, religion, and gender issues characteristic of Chinese culture. The course is conducted in a lecture format with class discussions and guided field trips.

HIST230

Survey of Native History of North America

(4,0) 4 on demand

A study of American Indian history from earliest times to the present, with emphasis placed on the historical development of Indian tribes located in the Great Lakes region. Also listed as NATV230.

HIST235

History of Applied Science and Technology

(4,0) 4 on demand

An introductory study of the origins and development of the applied sciences and technology from 1790 to the present. This survey will focus on the scientists, engineers and inventors responsible for the rapid rise of modern technology, industry, and business with particular emphasis on the developments in chemistry, metallurgy, electromagnetism, thermodynamics and cybernetics. The impact of these developments on the marketplace and society in general will be a major concern.

HIST301

History of England: 1000 to 1714

(4,0) 4 on demand

These 700 years witness the formation and maturing of most of the important political and social institutions that have come to be the Anglo-Saxon civilization and tradition. This period is critical to understanding present-day American culture and civilization.

HIST302

England in the Modern World

(4,0) 4 spring, even-numbered years

A history of England from 1715 to the present, emphasizing the struggle for parliamentary government, the Anglo-French conflict for commercial and colonial empire, the Industrial Revolution, the evolution of democracy and the recession of the British Empire.

HIST310

Russia: From Under-developed State to Superpower

(4,0) 4 fall, odd-numbered years

A study of Russian history from Peter the Great to the present.

HIST315

Europe From Napoleon to World War I

(4,0) 4 fall, even-numbered years

A study in the political and economic history of Europe in the period 1789-1914.

HIST316

Europe in the 20th Century

(4,0) 4 spring, odd-numbered years

A study of Europe in the age of Nazism, Communism, World War I and II, and the Common Market.

HIST321

History of Michigan

(2,0) 2

The History of Michigan is a survey course that will include an examination of the geology, geography, and history of the state. This course will also study the role of citizens, events, issues, and their impact on the development of Michigan as well as the larger developments in the United States during the Jacksonian Period, the Civil War Period, the Period of Rapid Industrialization and Urbanization, the Period of 1914 to 1945, the Period 1950 to the Present, the Period of Industrial Expansion and Decline, and the Post-Vietnam War Period of Globalization. The major political, economic, social, and cultural movements and developments of these historic periods will be examined.

HIST331

American Intellectual and Cultural History I

(4,0) 4 fall, even-numbered years

A study of American cultural and intellectual institutions as they developed from their Elizabethan and European origins to the mid-19th century. The emphasis will be placed upon the emergence of the unique and variant adaptations that arose in the first 250 years of English settlement in America.

HIST332

American Intellectual and Cultural History II

(4,0) 4 spring, odd-numbered years

A study of American culture from the mid-19th century until the present. Often considered our finest century, the 19th century witnesses many of America's most unique, fascinating and important contributions. The physical and philosophical aspects of these years will be surveyed. Particular attention will be given to areas where America comes to exercise important influences overseas.

HIST333

American Military History

(4,0) 4 on demand

A general survey of American military history with a specific emphasis on the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. To utilize the unique geographic location of LSSU, field trips to the Straits of Mackinac and St. Joseph's Island are a part of the course.

HIST335

American Political Parties

(4,0) 4 on demand

A study of the rise and development of the American party system and the large number of major and minor parties that have participated in this system in the years prior to 1945. These parties will be treated in an historical fashion rather than structurally. May be taken for political science credit.

HIST346

Canadian History

(4,0) 4 On Demand

A survey of Canadian history including the moving frontier, relations with United States, British-French rivalry, the establishment of democratic government and the changing relationship to Great Britain.

HIST361

Latin America

(4,0) 4 Fall, even-numbered years

A study and analysis of Latin American history from the end of the Colonial Period to the present. This course will examine the basic political, social and religious institutions of Latin America and their evolution and the role in the change of problems of U.S.-Latin American relations will be an important focus of this study. Prerequisite: GEOG322 geography of South America.

HIST371

Far East Civilization: 1850 to Present

(4,0) 4 Odd numbered years

A study of the history of China, Japan, India and adjoining areas of Asia from 1850 to present.

HIST420

Field Methods of Archaeology

(4,4) 8 Summer

Field course in archaeological survey and excavation methods and techniques, at various sites in area including 1822 Fort Brady. Course held on-site M-R for eight weeks. Only four credit hours may count toward 300- and 400-level courses for history majors. No prerequisites.

HIST425

Politics of US Labor History

(3,0) 3

This course examines the role of organized labor in the U.S. history, from colonial times to contemporary times. Attention will be given to the development of policies affecting unions. Prerequisite: upper-division student status.

HIST440

The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution

(4,0) 4 Spring

The events between 1763 and 1791 which produce these documents are the United States in the historical sense. Using original documents and contemporary comments, this critical era will be studied in depth to determine whence we came. Prerequisite: U.S. history sequence desired.

HIST441

Diplomatic History of the United States I

(4,0) 4 Fall, odd numbered years

American diplomacy from 1775 through the 19th century to U.S. entry into World War I in 1917. May be used as political science credit.

HIST442

Diplomatic History of the United States II

(4,0) 4 Spring, even numbered year

American diplomacy from the entry of the U.S. into World War I in 1917 up through present day. May be used as political science credit.

HIST490

Individual Historical Research

(0,1-4) 1-4 On Demand

Independent study under supervision of history faculty. May be repeated up to a total of six credits. Does not apply toward 300- or 400-level requirements in history. Prerequisite: Permission of the supervising faculty.

HIST496

Historical Methods

(2,0) 2 Fall

Survey emphasizing research aids and techniques and historical analysis. Readings, discussions and written exercises introduce students to problems, methods and techniques of historical research. Discussion of and practice in main techniques of historical method, including bibliography and documentation. Prerequisites: Senior standing and pursuit of a major or minor in history.

HIST497

Senior Seminar in History

(0-6) 2 Spring

Students will complete a historical research project under the supervision of a faculty member; at end of term participants make oral presentation at seminar for other students and invited guests, and submit the final paper. Prerequisite: HIST496 and instructor permission.

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HLTH101

Introduction to Medical Terminology

(2,0) 2

This course introduces the beginning student to basic medical terminology related to all areas of health care. The focus of this course is on understanding and proper usage of medical language.

HLTH104

Nutrition for Early Childhood

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Introduction to the function and metabolism of nutrients with special emphasis on the relationship between nutrition and childhood growth and development between 0-8. Lectures, discussion and community-based assignments will relate the body systems to the child's nutritional status, review recent developments in nutrition as they relate to childhood development, and provide basic nutrition education principles for adaptation in community settings.

HLTH185

Basic Pre-Nursing Competency Skills

(0,3) 1

The purpose of this course is to introduce the beginning student to basic pre-nursing skills. The student will learn hand washing, putting on and removing gloves, linen changes, dependent positioning, independent positioning, transfers, total hygiene, ambulation, body mechanics and patient safety.

HLTH208

Principles of Human Nutrition

(3,0) 3

Fundamentals of human nutrition and nutrition therapy are presented in relation to human body function in wellness and illness. With a special focus across the lifespan, content from this course begins to build a foundation for the interpretation of diet regimes and diet formulations for patients with nutritional needs. This course is required for all nursing students. Prerequisites: BIOL122 or BIOL105 with a grade of C or better.

HLTH209

Pharmacology

(3,0) 3

Study of basic concepts of pharmacology and their relationships to health care. Drug metabolic processes are described providing foundation for clinical judgments about drug actions, reactions and interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL122 or 105 and CHEM105.

HLTH210

Introduction to Health Care Concepts and Issues

(3,0) 3

This course is an introduction to the health care system with analysis of the issues and trends affecting the provision of health care services. Health care topics reviewed will include both local and global issues. Required course for environ-mental health and healthcare and administration; may also be used as an elective course. Material supports accreditation criteria for enviromental health. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

HLTH232

Pathophysiology

(3,0) 3

Study of physiological alterations in the body which disrupt homeostasis. Integrates anatomy, physiology and biochemistry into framework for studying disease. Core content provides understanding of mechanism and principles of disruptions of health. Emphasis on clinical correlations and physiological basis for common disorders. Prerequisite: BIOL122.

HLTH235

Healthcare Informatics

(2,0) 2

The purpose of this course is to gain a basic understanding of nursing informatics and its application to education, research and practice in health care professions. Topics include computer literacy skills, information literacy, and overall informatics competencies. Competencies taught will meet the American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice (ANA, 2001) for beginning nurses. Prerequisites: Admission into Nursing program and basic computer skills.

HLTH328

Multicultural Approaches to Health Care

(3,0) 3

This course explores values, beliefs and practices related to health behaviors in a variety of culturally diverse groups. Methods for fostering culturally sensitive care are explored. Content includes communication, biological and nutritional considerations, assessment techniques and alternative/complementary health practices. Prerequisite: SOCY101. Also listed as NURS328.

HLTH329

Womens Health Issues

(2,0) 2

This course explores the diverse health needs of women across the life span. Students are encouragedto take an active participation in identifying topics of interest. Social, cultural, political, economic, legal and ethical issues are analyzed for their influences on women's health and the health care women receive. Prerequisite: SOCY101.

HLTH330

Applied Nutrition

(2,0) 2 alternate years

Application of nutrition principles in health care; obesity, anorexia nervosa and bulimia; emphasis on gathering information and relevant objective measurements (anthropometric, biochemical) for use in developing nutritional care plans. Prerequisite: HLTH208.

HLTH352

Health Issues of Aging Populations

(3,0) 3

This course is designed to assist students from a variety of disciplines to gain a greater understanding of health-related issues that are associated with advancing age. In addition to exploring physiological and psychological changes experienced by our elderly clients, students will learn how they can adapt their work strategies to work more effectively for the elderly clients that they serve. Prerequisite: PSYC155 and junior level status. Also listed as NURS352.

HLTH354

Legal and Financial Issues in Health Care Administration

(3,0) 3

This course is intended for students preparing for careers in management in health care fields or as health care practitioners. Students will be made aware of legal and financial issues and problems including fault liability; institutional liability; forms of organization; credentialing and appointments; staffing issues; consent and refusal of treatment; and health care financing. The student will be more aware of the need to seek professional counsel to minimize and prevent litigation. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Also listed as BUSN354.

HLTH452

Contemporary Issues in Nutrition

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Utilizing an epidemiological frame, students will learn how to research current issues and topics in nutrition for closer examination and discussion. Nutritional trends and topics such as nutraceuticals, nutrigenomics, functional foods, supplements, herbs, and advertised dietary approaches aimed at promoting wellness and health will be explored in-depth and analyzed. Prerequisites: BIOL122, CHEM105, HLTH104, 108, 208 and EXER275.

HLTH490

Independent Study in Health

(1-4,0) 1-4

Individual investigation of topics tailored to student interest and need. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and instructor permission.

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HONR101

Honors First-Year Seminar (variable topics)

(1-2,0) 1-2

An intensive reading/discussion seminar of selected topics from any discipline of special interest to first-years honors students. An interdisciplinary focus is encouraged as well as the inclusion of active learning strategies that promote self-directed learning. Class size is limited to 15 to promote student and faculty interaction around the world of ideas. Prerequisites: status as an Honors candidate (freshman) or fully admitted University Honors Program student, and/or permission of the Honors coordinator. May be repeated for a maximum of four credits.

HONR202

Honors Contemporary Issues

(3,0) 3

An interdisciplinary sophomore-level seminar for University Honors Programs students. The course is designed to accommodate a range of specific topics; the particular topics, however, will investigate some aspect of the history of intellectual ideas, the nature of intellectual inquiry, and/or the construction of knowledge. The instructor serves as a facilitator in the seminar format which is intended to encourage student-directed learning. Prerequisites: formal admission to the University Honors Program and/or permission of the Honors Program coordinator. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

HONR302

Honors Ideas Seminar

(3,0) 3

A junior-level seminar for University Honors Program students. The course is designed to accommodate a range of special topics to be submitted by LSSU faculty under the general provision for Special Topics; the topics may evolve out of an interdisciplinary focus on some aspect of traditional disciplinary subject matter, or may be a reconfiguration of a regular course, redesigned to meet the particular needs of Honors Program students. The role of the instructor, however, would be as a facilitator, working within the seminar format to encourage student-directed learning around a topic requiring intellectual rigor. As this is a core requirement for all junior Honors students, it is expected that a given course proposal would not require prerequisites beyond those for general education. Prerequisites: formal admission to the University Honors Program, junior status, and/or permission of the Honors Program coordinator. HONR201 recommended. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits.

HONR401

Honors Thesis

(1-4,0) 1-4

A major written work based on independent research or creative effort to be carried out under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. Research in intended to be widely interpreted and may include, but is not limited to, experiments, analysis of existing data, and a summary and integration of already completed but dispersed research. Students will make a formal presentation of their findings to the Honors Council, the thesis supervisor, junior/senior Honors students, and others in the spring of their senior year. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA, 15 Honors credits, HONR201 and 301. Students must present a fully developed proposal to the Honors Council for approval before enrolling in HONR401 or its equivalent in their major.

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HUMN203

Survey of Chinese Culture

(3,0) 3 summer

Designed for students interested in Chinese culture and study abroad. Taught in English and offered at a partner university in China during the first summer session. This four-week course introduces the major cultural and artistic aspects of Chinese society. Lecture topics include Chinese history, geography, language, ethos, philosophy, literature, religion, historical relics, education, medicine, architecture, etiquette, and social and economic aspects of Chinese culture. Field trips to museums, art galleries, historic sites, and places of interest are scheduled throughout the trip.

HUMN240

Native Art and Culture

(3,0) 3

An overview of traditional and contemporary Native arts including visual art, music, literature, storytelling, architecture, theater and dance within their cultural context. Relationships between historical and contemporary forms and expression of Native identity and philosophy through artistic mediums will be examined. Also listed as NATV240.

HUMN251

Humanities I

(4,0) 4 fall, spring,

The humanities in the life of mankind from prehistoryto the Medieval epoch. Emphasizes significant values evolved in the Hebrew, Greek, Roman and early Christian cultures. Includes consideration of the origins of the arts, language, religion, mythology, philosophy, and ancient Chinese and Indian systems of religious thought. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

HUMN252

Humanities II

(4,0) 4 fall, spring,

Continuation of HUMN251, the humanities in the age of science, from the early Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

HUMN255

World Mythology

(4,0) 4

A survey of world mythology from "Gilgamesh" to "Finnegan's Wake". Prerequisite: ENGL110.

HUMN256

Introduction to Film: Images of Our Culture

(2,2) 3

An exploration of film as an image of our culture in both its technical sense and in its role as a contemporary art form which conveys and delimits our aesthetic and social values. Focus on the visual elements of film, historical development of the medium, and its narrative modes through screening of significant films. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

HUMN261

World Literature I

(3,0) 3 on demand

The Ancient World to the Renaissance. Readings in translation of significant, primarily Western texts. Selection can include the Bible and works by such authors as Homer, Virgil, Thucydides, Tacitus, Boccaccio, Montaigne, Rabelais, and others. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

HUMN262

World Literature II

(3,0) 3 on demand

The Renaissance to modern times. Readings in translation of significant, primarily Western, texts. Selections can include works by Galileo, Voltaire, Racine, Goethe, Ibsen, Dostoevksy, Brecht, Kafka, Sartre and others. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

HUMN490

Directed Studies in Humanities

(1,0) 1 on demand

To provide students who need one credit of general humanities with an opportunity to read or explore material related to the content of that term. Papers and tutorial session required. Prerequisites: Seven hours of humanities credit; evidence that students are capable of carrying out independent study; approval of department chair or dean.

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INTB375

International Business Law

(3,0) 3

The course provides an introduction to the environment of international business and law. It will focus on the foundations and principles of the international legal environment and international legal systems. The course covers the law on international trade. It allows the student to understand government foreign trade policies, the law concerning international business transactions, importing, exporting, transportation and logistics. This course covers a range of legal issues involved in conducting international business, surveying some of the many issues encountered in intellectual property and licensing, and the taxation of international business transactions.

INTB389

Competing in the Global Market Place

(3,0) 3

This course presents a systematic overview of international business and provides an introduction to important issues, including international trade policy, the global monetary system, and strategies of international business. Additionally, the course will look at management practices of international business, including: organizational structure of multinational organizations, production and logistics, human resource management, and financial management.

INTB420

International Comparative Management

(3,0) 3

This course in international comparative management will examine important trends impacting international business as well as the major and developing players in the international economy. The course will examine the stage on which international management is conducted, which includes political, legal and socio-cultural systems as a backdrop. The course will cover how firms develop and execute their international strategies and how they stay ahead of their competitions, once they do. An important aspect for the success of international companies is HR (Human Resources). The course will explore how firms can build an outstanding international workforce through selecting and motivating employees as well as dealing with a host of related human resource management issues, such as compensation, performance appraisal, training and development and labor relations from an international perspective. Prerequisites: MGMT360 or special permission of instructor.

INTB486

International Marketing

(3,0) 3

The International Marketing course examines the scope, challenge and dynamic environment of international marketing. This course will provide an understanding of the cultural environment of global markets, global opportunities and the development and implementation of global marketing strategies. Challenging decisions must be made in international marketing objectives-strategies-policies, regional & country market selection, products that fit regions-countries, multiple distribution channels, communications to fit each global region, management models & organizations per region-country, knowledge-information-data management, exploration of cultural issues, competition, economies, and customers. Prerequisites: MRKT281 or permission of instructor.

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INTD101

Boat Handling and Navigation

(2,3) 3

Topics related to the art of seamanship are covered, including the basics of boating and safety. Piloting and navigation are emphasized with an understanding of weather, waves, and wind, as well as the use of board electronic equipment. Pre- or corequisites: MATH108 and permission of instructor.

INTD300

The Human Environment

(3,0) 3

Designed to assist the participant in understanding how the individual can become involved with solving environmental problems. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of course coordinator.

INTD301

TRECS Planning Semester

(1,0) 1

This course will function as a planning and organizational course for students who intend to be involved in the travel semester course which will be offered the following fall semester. Prerequisites: The student must be at least a second semester sophomore and be planning to enroll in the fall travel semester (TRECS).

INTD310

Foreign Study

1-16 graded

Individual extension added based on student's program.

INTD320

Foreign Study

3-16 credit/no credit

Individual extension added based on student's program.

INTD333

The Origins of Human Nature

(4,0) 4

An integrated, interdisciplinary examination of the origins of human nature from the perspective of contemporary evolutionary theory, ethology and biological anthropology. The course examines the origins of - among other phenomena - sexual behavior, marriage and family life, crime, social stratification, leadership, government, politics, patriotism, nationalism, racism, ethnocentrism, aggression, genocide, war, ideology and morality. Prerequisites: a college biology course of PSYC101, one college course from each of two social science disciplines (anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology), and junior standing.

INTD380

TRECS Semester Seminar

(3,0) 3

This course will focus upon the educational opportunities which will be available through the specific sites that are visited during the travel semester. These sites include but are no limited to Washington D.C., New York City, St. Louis, MO, San Francisco, CA, various national parks, national monuments, national battlegrounds, national museums, and other regions and cities throughout the United States.

INTD398

Planning an Experiential Learning Project

(1,0) 1

A weekly seminar class for students planning a major experiential learning project, such as a capstone academic service learning project or internship. Students will work with the course instructor to define the project objectives, outline the tasks, plan the work with the host agency, plan the project assessment techniques and budget, and design the academic evaluation. The outcome of the class will be a proposal for the project. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor.

INTD399

Internship in (Department)

(1-4,0) 1-4

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to earn credit while obtaining meaningful discipline-related work experience outside the classroom setting. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 45 hours in an approved work setting for each credit hour earned. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA in major, junior standing and permission of department head at least one semester in advance of registering for the course.

INTD410

Foreign Study

3-16 3-16

Individual extension added based on student\'s program. (Graded)

INTD420

Foreign Study

3-16 3-16

Individual extension added based on student's program. 3-16 credit/no credit

INTD490

Senior Directed Study

(3-4,0) 3-4

This course is designed to allow liberal studies majors the opportunity to develop and implement a project/paper using the skills and knowledge from their previous course work. Projects/papers should relate to the student's individual areas of study, and represent a synthesis of their previous learning under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. Prerequisites: senior status and approval of the appropriate chair(s).

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JAPN105

Intensive Introductory Japanese Language I

(10,2) 10

This course is designed as an intensive introductory study of Japanese. The class meets five hours per week and the laboratory/recitation/practice sessions meet five hours each week. The "New Jordan method" of Japanese language studies for English speakers is used in both class and lab sessions.

JAPN106

Intensive Introductory Japanese Language II

(10,2) 10

This course is designed as a continuation of JAPN105. It will stress uses of written Japanese and a research project in which communication with Japanese in the community will be vital. The "New Jordan Method" will be the basis of the instruction.

JAPN201

Culture and Society of Japan I

(3,0) 3

This is a very broad overview course which examines the social and political development of Japan from prehistoric times to 1300 A.D. It combines written text materials with field work. An emphasis will be placed on the social organization of Japan and its relationships with traditional religious values, economic structures, socialization of children and political institutions.

JAPN202

Culture and Society in Japan II

(3,0) 3

This is an overview of Japanese history which examines the political and social developments of Japan from 1300 A.D. to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the Shogunate Tradition, the Meiji Restoration and 20th century political, economic and social developments.

JAPN301

Japanese Art and Culture I

(4,0) 4

This course is a broad overview of the development of the painting, sculpturing, architecture and literary traditions of Japan from earliest times to 1300 A.D. Special emphasis will be placed on the historic collections available in Nara and Kyoto. Biweekly field trips to examine and study local sites will be a regular portion of the instruction.

JAPN302

Japanese Art and Culture II: 1300 to Present

(4,0) 4

This course is designed as a study of the development of Japanese art, architecture and literature from the Ashikaga Shogunate to the present. Special attention will be given to the influences from Western civilization and its impact on Japanese culture.

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JOUR211

Newswriting

(3,0) 3

Gathering, processing and writing news and opinions on current matters using professional standards and formats in print and broadcast news and public relations. Prerequisite: COMM280.

JOUR220

Photojournalism

(3,0) 3

Fundamentals of 35mm camera operations with emphasis on creative and professional applications. Weekly assignments and critique. Student required to have a camera with manual controls (shutter speed and aperture setting). Assignments in color negative film (color prints) processed commercially. No prerequisites.

JOUR310

Editing and Production

(3,0) 3

Focuses on news editing, headline writing, newspaper design and layout as well as newsroom management. Prerequisite: JOUR211.

JOUR311

Supervising School Publications

(3,0) 3

Teaches the elements of supervising high school publications including the high school newspaper or yearbook; methods of production; problems of production; the elements of libel; and good taste. Prerequisite: JOUR211.

JOUR410

Broadcast Newswriting

(2,3) 3

Designed to improve students' broadcast newswriting skills from the fundamental level of those developed in COMM280. Upon completion of this course, the student will be familiar with the process by which broadcast news is reported, written and performed on the air. Prerequisite: COMM280.

JOUR411

Broadcast Editing and Production

(2,3) 3

Designed to build upon the broadcast reporting, writing and performing skills developed in JOUR410. Students will become familiar with production of newscasts, public affairs documentaries, the role of the producer in modern radio, the function and operation of the console, tape recording and playback units, microphones and sound, splicing and dubbing, achieving effects and news-oriented talk shows. Prerequisite: JOUR410.

JOUR413

Directed Individual Studies

(2,0) 2

Shine Sundstrom journalism internship at Sault Ste. Marie Evening News: Experience in newsroom and on assignment; writing, rewriting; use of word processor. Prerequisites: Junior status; COMM280 and JOUR211. File application with the chair of the Department of English and Communication by fifth week of previous semester.

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LAWS102

Legal Research and Case Analysis

(3,0) 3

Introduction to the law library and its use. Students will develop research techniques and skills in using encyclopedias, treatises, digests, case reporters, looseleaf services, annotated reports, legal periodicals, legislation, legislative history, administrative materials, shepardization and citation of legal authorities. Students will also develop skills in analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing court opinions and statutory law.

LAWS125

Civil Litigation and Procedure

(4,0) 4

Concentration on Federal and Michigan rules of procedure prior to, during and after trial. Detailed study of drafting pleadings, discovery procedures and case preparation for trial and appeal. Prerequisites: LAWS102 and 150.

LAWS140

Personal Injury Litigation and Investigative Techniques

(3,0) 3

The study of personal litigation shall include principles of negligence, intentional torts, strict liability, products liability and professional malpractice. Emphasis will be placed on investigative techniques utilized in personal injury cases; students will draft complaints and other documents used in such litigation. The course also covers interview techniques, utilization of experts and documentary evidence.

LAWS150

Legal Professionals and Ethical Considerations

(3,0) 3

Overview of the members of the legal team (legal assistants/paralegals, legal administrators, law office managers, attorneys, computer system specialists and others) including job qualifications and employment opportunities. Basic legal principles and terminology shall be discussed. The Michigan Rule of Professional Conduct, as well as other ethical rules and/or guidelines, and their application to various legal professionals shall be studied in detail including such areas as: confidentiality, conflict of interest, unauthorized practice of law, legal advertising, competency considerations, and legal malpractice.

LAWS202

Legal Writing and Analysis

(3,0) 3

Introduction to legal writing styles and skills. Through review and preparation of legal documents, students will become acquainted with basic principles, style, organization and structure of certain legal documents which shall include letter writing, preparation of memorandum of law and an appellate brief. Research skills and analysis of court opinions will be further refined. Prerequisites: LAWS102 and 125.

LAWS222

Introduction to the Legal Profession

(3,0) 3

Students will become familiar with how the law functions, how the legal profession has evolved, how to prepare for and apply to law school, how law schools differ from college (including development of various methods and techniques to study the law). In addition, students will become aware of the legal profession and its demands, opportunities, options and trends. Prerequisites: POLI110, sophomore standing and/or permission of instructor. Also listed as POLI222.

LAWS250

Law Office Management, Systems and Technology

(3,0) 3

The management and organization of a law office, including such areas as staffing, timekeeping, equipment, legal systems, file maintenance, public relations, and the utilization of computer technology in law office organization, litigation and case preparation shall be discussed. Prerequisites: LAWS202 and 125.

LAWS299

Legal Studies Internship and Professional Development Seminar

(1,3-7) 4-8

A supervised work experience as a legal assistant or legal administrator with a law firm, government agency, court or business enterprise such as a bank, corporation or insurance company. Personal and professional goals shall be refined, including resume preparation, interviewing skills, job search plan and overall career planning. Preparation of a student portfolio and professional portfolio will be required. Prerequisites: LAWS202 and 125, and permission of instructor.

LAWS300

Seminar in Legal Studies

1-4 variable

A seminar dealing with selected topics in legal studies. The content of this course may vary each time the course is offered. May be repeated with permission of advisor. Prerequisites: LAWS202, 125, and/or permission of legal studies advisor.

LAWS301

Alternative Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management

(3,0) 3

This course explores non-judicial avenues of dispute or conflict resolution such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration, as well as court-annexed alternative dispute resolution mechanisms. The procedural aspects, key elements, ethical considerations and practical applications of alternative dispute resolution are discussed as part of the dispute resolution landscape. The course will also include dispute resolution and conflict management simulations and case studies. Also listed as SOWK301.

LAWS305

Tribal Law and Government

(3,0) 3

A study of tribal law which will explore such areas as the structure of tribal government; tribal sovereignty; treaties; civil and criminal court jurisdiction in Indian country; tribal resources; tribal economic development; taxation and regulation; rights of individual Indians; and various federal laws and court cases concerning and affecting tribes and their members. Prerequisites: HIST230 and NATV230. Also listed as NATV305/SOWK305.

LAWS320

Real Estate Law

(3,0) 3

Various aspects of real estate law and procedures will be studied, including conveyances, mortgages, land contracts, titles, environmental concerns, foreclosure proceedings and landlord-tenant relationships. Emphasis will be placed on preparation of legal documents and pleadings regarding real estate law. Prerequisites: LAWS102 and 125.

LAWS321

Family Law

(2,0) 2

Areas of family law including marriage contracts, divorce, separation, child custody, juvenile law and adoption will be explored. Prerequisites: LAWS102 and 125.

LAWS322

Probate Law and Procedure

(3,0) 3

The Probate Code will be discussed in detail along with the major topics of wills, estates, trusts, guardianships, conservatorships and other probate court procedures. Preparation of probate documents and pleadings will be emphasized. Prerequisites: LAWS202, 125 and 320.

LAWS401

Evidence and Trial Practice

(3,0) 3

An in-depth study of trial preparation and practice including gathering and organization of materials and information; discovery; depositions; voir dire; preparing trial witnesses and exhibits; preparing trial motions and briefs; jury instructions and forms; organizing the trial; and post-trial procedures and documents. The course also covers evidentiary rules as they relate to trial practice and preparation. Prerequisites: LAWS125, 140, 150 and 202.

LAWS405

No-Fault Automobile Law

(3,0) 3

The study of the Michigan no-fault automobile law, including Michigan statutory and case law developments; first and third party cases; recoverable benefits and damages; review of insurance policies; and the preparation and evaluation of such cases for settlement and trial. Prerequisites: LAWS125, 140, 150 and 202.

LAWS406

Workers Disability Compensation Law

(2,0) 2

A study of the Worker's Disability Compensation Act, including both Michigan statutory and case law developments. Also, the administrative procedures and worker's compensation case preparation will be addressed. Prerequisites: LAWS125, 140 and 202.

LAWS450

Advanced Legal Writing and Interviewing Seminar

(3,0) 3

An advanced study of legal research and writing including the preparation of complex pleadings, legal documents, mediation summaries, settlement brochures, and trial and appellate briefs. Development of interviewing and investigative skills and techniques with regard to client and witnesses will also be discussed. Prerequisites: LAWS125, 150, 202 and senior standing.

LAWS490

Independent Study in Legal Studies

(1-4) 1-4

This may take the form of either a research project or a program of directed reading on a specific topic. One to four credits over a period of one or two semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student's project. May be repeated up to a total of eight credits.

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LIBR101

Information and Information Technology Literacy

(1,0) 1

Introduces students to information tools and their uses, including reference books, indexes, periodicals, microforms, computer products and the Internet. Students will learn to effectively search information tools so they can more efficiently meet their information needs.

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LING403

Language Acquisition and Foreign Language Teaching

(3,0) 3

Introduction to theories of language and language acquisition as applied to current language teaching methods and classroom practices. This course is a requirement for both the Spanish teaching major and the Spanish teaching minor. The class will be taught in English, but students will use a foreign language of their choice in teaching presentations. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and SPAN362 or FREN351 and FREN352.

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MATH081

Pre-Algebra I

(1,0) 1

The first in the series of six modules addresses basic operations and problem solving using whole numbers and fractions. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: None.

MATH082

Pre-Algebra II

(1,0) 1

The second in the series of six modules addresses basic operations and problem solving using decimals, percents, and ratio & proportion. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: MATH081 or placement by examination.

MATH083

Pre-Algebra III

(1,0) 1

The third in the series of six modules addresses solving problems related to measurement, geometry and statistics. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: MATH082 or placement by examination.

MATH084

Introductory Algebra I

(1,0) 1

The fourth in the series of six modules addresses the introduction to algebra, real numbers, algebraic expressions and solving of elementary equations. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: MATH083 or placement by examination.

MATH085

Introductory Algebra II

(1,0) 1

The fifth in the series of six modules addresses manipulation and graphing of equations in two variables as well as solving systems of equations in two variables. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: MATH084 or placement by examination.

MATH086

Introductory Algebra III

(1,0) 1

The sixth in the series of six modules addresses multiplying, factoring and manipulating polynomial expressions and simplifying radical expressions. Credit in this course does not apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: MATH085 or placement by examination.

MATH102

Intermediate Algebra

(4,0) 4

Algebra for students who have not had second-level high school algebra or who need a refresher course in that level of algebra. Real numbers and operations, solving and graphing first degree equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and quadratic equations, algebra of polynomials, radical and rational expressions and equations, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisites: One year of high school algebra and MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam. This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.

MATH103

Number Systems and Problem Solving for Elementary Teachers

(3,2) 4

General notions of problem solving and number theory for elementary teachers including sets; funcitons; numeration systems and properties and operations of whole numbers, integers, fractions and decimals; and proportional reasoning. Prerequisite: Equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT, or Placement Exam, or MATH102 with a grade of C (2.00) or better.

MATH104

Geometry and Measurement for Elementary Teachers

(3,2) 4

Basic notions of geometry for elementary teachers including constructions, congruence and similarity, motion geometry, symmetry and tessellations. Concepts of measurement, coordinate geometry, probability and data analysis. Prerequisite: Equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT, or Placement Exam, or MATH102 with a grade of C (2.00) or better.

MATH108

Trigonometry and Vectors for Physics

(1,0) 1

Trigonometric functions, basic identities, inverse trigonometric functions and vectors. Prerequisite: equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam or MATH102 with a grade of C or better.

MATH110

Explorations in Mathematics

(3,0) 3

A discovery course in mathematics which explores the varied relationships of mathematics to society and the natural world through application and enrichment. A statistics component is included, and a term project is required. This course satisfies the general education mathematics requirement. It will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

MATH111

College Algebra

(3,0) 3

This course is a study of families of functions through formulas, tables, graphs and words, emphasizing applications in business, life and social science. The function families include linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and power functions. Within these families, topics include problem solving, model creation, solving equations, systems of equations and inequalities, rates of change, graphing, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and satisfactory achievement on the mathematics placement exam or MATH102 with a grade of C or better. High school plane geometry also recommended. This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.

MATH112

Calculus for Business and Life Sciences

(4,0) 4

Limits, differentiation, applications of the derivative, integration, application of the definite integral, techniques of integration. Calculus of exponential and logarithmic functions, elementary differential equations, functions of several variables. Prerequisite: MATH111 with a grade of C or better. This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.

MATH131

College Trigonometry

(3,0) 3

Basic theory of trigonometric functions and inverse trigonometric functions. Applications include trigonometric equations, plane trigonometry, vectors and complex numbers. Introduction to conic sections. Study of exponential functions and their connection to trigonometry functions, logarithmic functions and applications. Prerequisites: (1) Two years of high school algebra and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT, COMPASS test or Placement Exam, or MATH102 with a grade of C or better. (2) One half-year of high school trigonometry with a grade of C or better is strongly recommended.

MATH140

Precalculus Mathematics

(5,0) 5

Basic theory of functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Inequalities. Analytic geometry, plane trigonometry and vectors. Complex numbers. Systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants. Prerequisites: two years of high school algebra and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam, or MATH102 with a grade of C or better, and one-half year of high school trigonometry or MATH108 with a grade of C or better is strongly recommended. This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.

MATH151

Calculus I

(4,0) 4

Limits, continuity and inverse functions. Logarithmic and exponential functions. Differentiation and applications of the derivative. L'Hopital's rule. Inverse trigonometric functions. Integration and the definite integral. Prerequisites: high school mathematics that includes two years of algebra, one year of plane geometry and one-half year of trigonometry and equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam, or MATH140 with a grade of C or better, or both MATH111 and 131 with a grade of C or better.

MATH152

Calculus II

(4,0) 4

Applications of the definite integral. Techniques of integration and improper integrals. Infinite series. Conic sections, polar coordinates and parametric equations. Prerequisite: MATH151 with a grade of C or better.

MATH207

Principles of Statistical Methods

(3,0) 3

Descriptive statistics, probability distributions (including normal, binomial and chi-square), techniques of statistical inference including tests of hypotheses and selected nonparametric tests. (This course is a survey of elementary statistical concepts.) Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam. This course will not count toward a major in mathematics.

MATH215

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

(3,0) 3

Elements of set theory, set algebra, cardinality, logic, mathematical induction, methods of proof, functions, relations, equivalence relations. Prerequisite: MATH151 or 112 with a grade of C or better.

MATH216

Discrete Mathematics and Problem Solving

(3,0) 3

Selected topics from discrete mathematics including fundamental counting principles, recurrence relations and an introduction to graph theory. A strong emphasis is placed on fundamental problem-solving techniques. Prerequisite: MATH215 with a grade of C or better.

MATH251

Calculus III

(4,0) 4

Three-dimensional space, vectors, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, topics in vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH152 with a grade of C or better.

MATH261

Introduction to Numerical Methods

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Floating point representation of numbers and floating point arithmetic. Survey of numerical methods for solving a wide variety of common mathematical problems, including solution of a single non-linear equation, solution of a system of linear equations, matrix inversion, numerical integration, function approximation, interpolation. Emphasis will be on the actual computer implementation of common algorithms for solving these problems. Prerequisites: CSCI105 or 121 with a grade of C or better and MATH152 with a grade of C or better.

MATH290

Independent Study in Mathematics

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in mathematics for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the department head. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher and permission of instructor.

MATH305

Linear Algebra

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An introduction to matrix algebra, vector spaces and linear transformation, including applications to the natural and social sciences. Prerequisites: MATH112 or 151 with a grade of C or better.

MATH308

Probability and Mathematical Statistics

(3,0) 3

An introductory course in probability and mathematical statistics. Probability, probability distributions, mathematical expectation, moment generating functions and the Central Limit Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH152 with a grade of C or better.

MATH309

Applied Statistics

(4,0) 4 alternate years

A continuation of MATH308 including estimation of parameters, testing hypotheses, nonparametric methods, analysis of variance, multiple regression and an introduction to statistical software packages. Prerequisite: MATH308 with a grade of C or better.

MATH310

Differential Equations

(3,0) 3

Differential equations of first order, linear differential equations of second and higher orders, including LaPlace transformation. Introduction to power series methods, applications. Prerequisite: MATH152 with a grade of C or better.

MATH321

History of Mathematics

(3,0) 3

Selected topics in the development of mathematics from the time of the ancient Babylonians and Egyptians to the 20th century. Prerequisites: MATH112 or 151 with a grade of C or better, and MATH215 with a grade of C or better.

MATH325

College Geometry

(2,2) 3 alternate years

Selected topics in geometry, including some or all of the following: Modern elementary geometry, transformations, Euclidean constructions, dissection theory, projective geometry, introduction to non-Euclidean geometry, and problems in foundations of geometry. Prerequisites: MATH152 and 215 with a grade of C or better.

MATH341

Abstract Algebra I

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An introduction to congruencies, groups, subgroups, quotient groups, fundamental homomorphism theorems, Sylow theorems. Prerequisite: MATH215 with a grade of C or better.

MATH342

Abstract Algebra II

(3,0) 3 on demand

A continuation of MATH341 including rings, integral domains, ideals, quotient rings, the natural homomorphism, fields and polynomial rings. Prerequisite: MATH341.

MATH351

Graph Theory

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Selected topics in graph theory, including connectivity, matchings, edge and vertex colorings, networks and tournaments. Prerequisite: MATH216 with a grade of C or better.

MATH401

Mathematical Modeling

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Selected applications of mathematics in such areas as biology, economics, social science and engineering are discussed. The construction of a mathematical model used to study a real situation will be stressed, as well as interpretation of mathematical results in that context. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing, a course in computer programming, and mathematical maturity at the level of MATH305, 308 or 310 with a minimum grade of C.

MATH411

Advanced Calculus

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An extension of the calculus in one, two, and three dimensions leading to the formulation and solution (in simple cases) of the partial differential equations of mathematical physics. Differential and integral calculus of vectors, divergence, curl, line, surface and volume integrals, Green's divergence and Stokes' theorems, heat and wave equations, Fourier series, orthogonal sets, boundary value problems, separation of variables. Prerequisite: MATH251 and 310 with a grade of C or better.

MATH413

Introduction to Complex Analysis

(3,0) 3 on demand

The calculus of functions of a complex variable, algebra and geometry of complex numbers, elementary functions, limits, derivatives, Cauchy-Rieman equations, integrals, Cauchy integral theorem, series, singularities, residue theorem. Prerequisite: MATH251.

MATH421

Real Analysis I

(3,0) 3 on demand

An examination of some of the foundations of the calculus, including basic topology of the real line, limits, continuity, metric spaces, function spaces, some uniformity concepts. Prerequisites: MATH215 and 251 with a minimum grade of C.

MATH422

Real Analysis II

(3,0) 3 on demand

Continuation of MATH421 with emphasis on measure and integration. Prerequisite: MATH421.

MATH490

Individualized Research Topics in Mathematics

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in mathematics for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the department head. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher and Permission of Instructor.

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MGMT280

Introduction to Management Information Systems

(3,0) 3

This course will introduce students to the processes and functions that plans for, develops, implements, and maintains IT hardware, software, and the portfolio of applications that people use to support the goals of an organization. Prerequisites: BUSN121 and ACTG132 with a grade of C or higher.

MGMT360

Management Concepts and Applications

(3,0) 3

Principles and techniques applicable to the functions of management: Planning, organizing, directing (staffing and leading) and controlling; development of management thought and decision-making; current issues and future concerns in management. Foundation course for study and understanding of management theory and practice. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MGMT365

Human Resource Management

(3,0) 3

An examination of current practices and recommended techniques by which management procures, develops, utilizes and maintains an effective work force. The major areas studied are: recruitment and selection, equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs, training and development, career planning and performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, safety and health issues, employee and labor relations, including grievance handling, contract negotiation and remaining union-free as an organization. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MGMT375

Introduction to Supply Chain Management

(3,0) 3

This course provides an overview of the supply chain function for an organization. The supply chain for any company is described as the continuous sequence of events and operations that add value to the firm. Topics will include purchasing and procurement, inbound and outbound logistics and transportation, operations and manufacturing planning and control, forecasting, quality control, enterprise resource planning and overall information system design for the firm. Prerequisite: BUSN211 or statistics equivalent.

MGMT380

Principles of Leadership

(3,0) 3

This course provides the student with an understanding of the principles and behaviors situationally appropriate to inspire and influence others. Whether people work individually, in small teams, task forces, or other units at all organizational levels; effective leadership sustains profitability, productivity, and excellent service. Studying research findings, leadership practices, and skills helps the student understand how this knowledge can be applied to effectively lead others. Prerequisite: MGMT360.

MGMT451

Labor Law

(4,0) 4

An analysis of labor laws pertaining to union-management relations; emphasis on the private sector as well as on laws relating to health care institutions; legal aspects of relationships between unions and their members; federal wage and hour laws, including administration of the statutes and their relationship; applicable remedies for violations of federal labor laws. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MGMT461

Management Simulation

(1,4) 3

Realistic simulations of business operations with an opportunity to practice the functions of management by means of computerized models and cases. Prerequisite: Pre- or corequisite: FINC341.

MGMT464

Organizational Behavior

(3,0) 3

An analysis of problems and cases relating to management and organizational behavior typically requiring decisions by an administrator. Topics include leadership, motivation, communication, negotiation, problem solving, decision making, conflict resolution, group dynamics, stress management, job design and organization structure. Prerequisite: MGMT360.

MGMT469

Collective Bargaining

(3,0) 3

An analysis of the process of collective bargaining, the major subjects of negotiation, including arbitration of grievances; process of dispute settlements; and influence of larger environment. The discussion includes theories of bargaining, strategies and weapons available to both parties. Also examines collective employee-employer relationships in the public sector and tactics of public employee groups and agencies. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MGMT471

Production/Operations Management

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the design and analysis of operational systems in manufacturing and service industries. Topics include manufacturing strategy, planning and control, forecasting, just in time systems, inventory models, product/process design, scheduling and simulation. Some mathematical models will be used. Emphasis will be on the role of operations within an organization and the formulation and solution of operational problems. Prerequisites: BUSN211 and MGMT360 or equivalents.

MGMT476

Employee Training and Development

(4,0) 4

This course provides the student with an understanding of how to prepare and deliver effective employee training. The course is in five parts: training and development needs analysis, program design, development, delivery, and evaluation. The principles and concepts learned are applied by preparing, delivering, and evaluating a three-hour training program. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

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MRKT281

Marketing Principles and Strategy

(3,0) 3

A study of the marketing principles, variables, institutions, target markets, marketing mix and the development of marketing strategy. Prerequisite: ENGL110

MRKT283

Principles of Selling

(3,0) 3

The study of personal selling and its requirements. Topics included are buyer behavior, sales presentations from prospecting to closing the sale, and overcoming objections. Sales interviews by students are an integral part of the course.

MRKT379

Sports and Events Marketing

(3,0) 3

A study of the theories, concepts, impacts, and contemporary issues unique to sports and events marketing, including the marketing athletes, teams, leagues, celebrities, entertainment, and special events. Prerequisite: MRKT281 or special permission of instructor.

MRKT381

Consumer Behavior

(3,0) 3

A study of behavioral concepts related to consumer behavior. Attention is directed toward understanding consumer needs, perceptions, attitudes, intentions and behavior within a strategic and managerial framework. Topics include the differences of complex decision making and habit and between high and low involvement decision making. Emphasis is on predicting and understanding purchase behavior for best firm/consumer needs\' match. Prerequisite: MRKT281.

MRKT383

E-Marketing

(3,0) 3

A study of the impact the Internet and other digital technologies have on the marketing of goods, services and ideas. The course will examine current e-marketing environment, strategy and management issues including consumer behavior, segmentation and targeting, differentiation and positioning, product, price, distribution, communication and customer relationship management. Ethical and legal issues will also be addressed. Prerequisite: MRKT281.

MRKT385

Services Marketing

(3,0) 3

A study of the principles and practices unique to service providers. The focus of this course is to examine how the marketing of services differs from traditional marketing principles/concepts applied to goods and the alternative strategies for service providers to improve service marketing effectiveness and customer interactions. Prerequisite: MRKT281.

MRKT387

Advertising Theory and Practice

(3,0) 3

A study of the principles and practices in various advertising media such as newspaper, radio, television, outdoor and direct mail; consideration of creative methods, consumer behavior, measurement of effectiveness and coordination with other aspects of the promotional program. Prerequisite: MRKT281.

MRKT388

Retail Management

(3,0) 3

A study of the field of retailing. A survey of retail institutions; store location and organization; buying and merchandising techniques; retail advertising, sales promotion and image; human resource policies; and store protection. Prerequisite: MRKT281.

MRKT389

Entrepreneurship

(3,0) 3

A study of individual small firms: start-up, on-going management, challenges, and requirements for success. Students will apply both strategic planning and the knowledge acquired from other business courses to (a) demonstrate understanding and competence in using S.A.P. in small business decision-making and operations, (b) develop a viable business plan for a new small business, and (c) utilize problem-solving for other local small businesses, where required, in an advisory capacity. Prerequisites: ACTG132 or 230, BUSN121 and MRKT281.

MRKT480

Marketing Research

(3,0) 3

Application of research methods to the field of marketing. Methods of gathering and presenting data, market analysis, consumer surveys and sales forecasting. Students will participate in a research project. Prerequisites: BUSN211, MRKT281 and 381.

MRKT481

Marketing Management

(3,0) 3

A study of the essential tasks of marketing managers: (1) identifying marketing opportunities, (2) developing marketing plans, and (3) implementing these plans by introducing marketing strategies. Prerequisites: MRKT281, 381, 480, and senior status.

MRKT483

Sales Force Management

(3,0) 3

Principles and policies of sales organization; career opportunities; recruiting, selecting and training sales people; motivation, supervision and evaluation of sales performance; compensation plans, quotes and expense accounts. Prerequisites: MRKT281 and 283.

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MUSC110

Orchestra

(0,3) 1

Perform regular series of concerts as a member of the Sault Symphony Orchestra.

MUSC111

Orchestra

(0,3) 1

Perform regular series of concerts as a member of the Sault Symphony Orchestra.

MUSC112

Band

(0,3) 1

Open to all University students. The concert band performs representative band and wind ensemble literature and provides a challenging musical experience.

MUSC113

Band

(0,3) 1

Open to all University students. The concert band performs representative band and wind ensemble literature and provides a challenging musical experience.

MUSC120

Introduction to Music I

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the basic vocabulary of music and to basic musicianship skills. Topics include notation, meter, rhythm, intervals, scales, chords, etc. No prerequisite.

MUSC121

Introduction to Music II

(3,0) 3

The course expands upon the musical vocabulary and skills developed in MUSC120. Topics include C-clefs, seventh chord, non-harmonic tones, cadences, etc. Prerequisite: MUSC120.

MUSC140

Chorus

(0,3) 1

Regular rehearsals and participation in various campus activities.

MUSC141

Chorus

(0,3) 1

Regular rehearsals and participation in various campus activities.

MUSC160

Jazz Ensemble

(0,3) 1

Regular rehearsals and performances during school year.

MUSC161

Jazz Ensemble

(0,3) 1

Regular rehearsals and performances during the school year.

MUSC170

Class Piano I

(0,2) 1

Beginning piano techniques. Music reading ability helpful but not required.

MUSC171

Class Piano II

(0,2) 1

To improve proficiency and techniques gained in MUSC170. Prerequisite: MUSC170.

MUSC180

Class Guitar I

(0,2) 1

Introduction to guitar playing including knowledge of musical rudiments, left and right hand techniques and ensemble performance.

MUSC181

Class Guitar II

(0,2) 1

Course emphasizes increasing technical achievement, musicianship and the development of individual musicality.

MUSC210

Applied Music I

(0,3) 1

Individual applied music instruction. For skilled musicians with admission at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits per instrument or for voice.

MUSC220

History and Appreciation of Music I

(4,0) 4

A survey of music from the Middle Ages to the early 19th century with emphasis on the music of Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Counts as humanities credit for general education requirements.

MUSC221

History and Appreciation of Music II

(4,0) 4

A survey of music of the 19th and 20th centuries. Counts as humanities credit for general education requirements.

MUSC235

Music for Elementary Teachers

(3,0) 3

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the philosophy, theories and contemporary issues in music education in the kindergarten through sixth grade classrooms. The student will develop a practical knowledge of music skills and instructional techniques when planning a music curriculum for the elementary classroom.

MUSC250

Chamber Music I

(0,2) 1

For advanced students interested in solo and ensemble performance in a supervised program.

MUSC251

Chamber Music II

(0,2) 1

For advanced students interested in solo and ensemble performance in a supervised program.

MUSC260

History and Appreciation of Jazz

(4,0) 4

The course explores the historical and stylistic development of jazz and explains how to listen to this type of music.

MUSC403

Senior Recital

(0,3) 1

Public recital at conclusion of music major program. Prerequisites: music major and senior standing.

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NATV141

Ojibwe I, Anishnaabemowin

(4,1) 4

Introduction to the Ojibwe language's vocabulary, phonics and grammar. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the minimum essentials of oral and written Ojibwe. This course serves as the foundation for further study in the Ojibwe language and culture. Students will begin to learn to read Ojibwe text. Students will learn to express themselves orally and gain the necessary knowledge and skill that will prepare the student for Ojibwe conversation.

NATV142

Ojibwe II, Anishnaabemowin

(4,1) 4

Further study on Ojibwe language vocabulary, phonics, grammar and elementary conversation. This course is designed to further acquaint students with the minimum essentials of oral and written Ojibwe. This course rounds out the foundation for further study in Ojibwe language and culture. Students will continue to learn to read Ojibwe text, express themselves orally; and gain the necessary knowledge, skill and practice which will prepare the student for Ojibwe conversation and elementary writing. Prerequisite: NATV141.

NATV201

Second-Year Ojibwe Conversation I, Anishnaabemowin

(4,1) 4

Further study in Ojibwe language with particular focus on Ojibwe conversation. This course will equip students with the essentials of oral and written Ojibwe. This course rounds out the foundation for further study in the Ojibwe language and culture. Students will continue to learn to read Ojibwe text, express themselves orally and gain the necessary knowledge, skill and practice which will prepare the student for Ojibwe conversation and elementary writing. Prerequisites: NATV141 and 142.

NATV202

Second-Year Ojibwe Conversation II

(4,0) 4

This course is designed for those who wish to further their understanding of the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) language. More attention will be given to the written form, and conversation practice will be more intensive. Students will learn about the customs and culture of the Anishinaabe people as they learn about the language. Prerequisite: NATV201.

NATV210

Indigenous Peoples of Central and South America

(3,0) 3

Course is an introduction to the native peoples of the South and Central (Meso) Americas based on archaeological and traditional information. The course content will focus on the history of cultural groups prior to the arrival of the Spanish. No prerequisites.

NATV225

Native Cultures of North America

(3,0) 3

A study of the Native American Indian and Inuit cultures of North America from earliest times to the present, with emphasis on contrasting patterns of cultures. Also listed as SOWK225.

NATV230

Survey of Native History of North America

(4,0) 4

A study of American Indian history from earliest times to the present, with emphasis placed on the historical development of Indian tribes located in the Great Lakes region. Also listed as HIST230.

NATV235

Survey of Native Literature of North America

(3,0) 3

Students will examine various types of Native American literatures, including traditional stories, non-fiction, fiction and poetry, from authors of numerous different nations. A variety of themes, including Native American identity and the role of culture in literature, will be covered. Corequisite ENGL111 (also listed an ENGL235).

NATV240

Native Art and Culture

(3,0) 3

An overview of traditional and contemporary Native arts including visual art, music, literature, storytelling, architecture, theater and dance within their cultural context. Relationships between historical and contemporary forms and expression of Native identity and philosophy through artistic mediums will be examined. Also listed as HUMN240.

NATV301

Anishinabe Oral and Recorded Literature I

(3,0) 3

Investigation of problems of reading and writing associated with Anishnaabemowin. Regional differences will be explored, compared and analyzed. Several dictionaries will be used as illustration of some of the problems associated with writing. Students will review recorded literature, write short stories/legends, record oral literature using a writing system assigned by the instructor. Oration in Anishnaabemowin required. Prerequisite: NATV202 with a grade of C or better.

NATV302

Anishinabe Oral and Recorded Literature II

(3,0) 3

Advanced investigation of problems of reading and writing associated with Anishnaabemowin. Regional differences will be explored, compared and analyzed in depth. Several dictionaries will be used as illustration of some of the problems associated with writing. Students will review recorded literature, write short stories/legends, record oral literature using a writing system assigned by the instructor. Translation, interpretation and oration in Anishnaabemowin required. Prerequisite: NATV301 with a grade of C or better.

NATV305

Tribal Law and Government

(3,0) 3

A study of tribal law which will explore such areas as the structure of tribal government; tribal sovereignty; treaties; civil and criminal court jurisdiction in Indian country; tribal resources; tribal economic development; taxation and regulation; rights of individual Indians; and various federal laws and court cases concerning and affecting tribes and their members. Prerequisites: NATV230 and HIST230. Also listed as LAWS305/SOWK305.

NATV310

Seminar in Native Studies of the Americas

(3,0) 3

A seminar dealing with selected topics in Native American studies. The content of this course may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: NATV225, 230, 235, 305 and SOCY226.

NATV320

Contemporary Native Issues of North America

(3,0) 3

A study of current Native American issues, problems and concerns. Prerequisites: NATV225, 230, 235, 305 and SOCY226.

NATV401

Seminar in Advanced Language Studies I

(3,0) 3

Advanced study in grammar of Anishnaabemowin language. Oral histories, humorous stories, general stories, legends and narrative stories will be used to demonstrate the complexities of the language. As verbs make up 80 percent of the language, the verb structure will be further analyzed. Learners will compare and contrast selected linguistic articles for their accuracy and inaccuracy in representing how the language works. Written and oral assignments of various degrees of difficulty will enhance the students' command of the language. Prerequisite: NATV302 with a grade of C or better.

NATV402

Seminar in Advanced Language Studies II

(3,0) 3

Advanced study in grammar and conversation of Anishnaabemowin language. Oral histories, humorous stories, general stories, legends and narrative stories will be used to demonstrate the complexities of the language. As verbs make up 80 percent of the language, the verb structure will be further analyzed. Learners will compare and contrast selected linguistic articles for their accuracy and inaccuracy in representing how the language works. Written and oral assignments of various degrees of difficulty will enhance the students' command of the language. Practical application of language outside the campus classroom. Prerequisite: NATV401 with a grade of C or better.

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NSCI101

Conceptual Physics

(3,2) 4

A survey of basic physical science principles emphasizing their applications in daily life. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

NSCI102

Introduction to Geology

(3,2) 4

A survey course to acquaint students with the major concepts and phenomena inherent in a study of geology. It will also provide sufficient background for a better understanding of human relationships to the physical environment. Credit can be earned for only one of NSCI102, GEOL115 and 121. Prerequisite: None.

NSCI103

Environmental Science

(3,0) 3

An introduction to environmental concepts and a brief survey of environmental issues facing society. Emphasis is placed on solutions and the responsibility of the individual towards these solutions.

NSCI104

Environmental Science Laboratory

(0,2) 1

Laboratory component of environmental science. Corequisite: NSCI103.

NSCI105

Physical Geography: Earth, Sun and Weather

(3,1) 3

Study of the physical properties of the earth's surface as they relate to weather and climate. Credit for both GEOG108 and NSCI105 not permitted.

NSCI107

Physical Geography: Landforms and Soils

(3,1) 3

Study of the physical properties of the earth's surface as they relate to landforms and soils. Credit for both GEOG106 and NSCI107 not permitted.

NSCI110

Chemistry in Society

(3,2) 4

An applied topical course examining the issues, problems and challenges facing modern society with an emphasis on the underlying chemical principles and theories. Attention will be given to decision-making activities, to developing critical thinking skills, and to addressing social issues that relate to chemistry. Pre- or co-requisite of MATH102 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

NSCI116

Introduction to Oceanography

(3,2) 4

A survey of the features, processes and evolution of Earth's ocean basins. The course will examine geological, physical, chemical and ecological aspects of oceanography with an emphasis on their interrelationships and their impact on humanity.

NSCI119

Descriptive Astronomy

(3,2) 4

Introductory course with a balanced, comprehensive account of contemporary astronomy with emphasis placed on the broad principles of astronomy rather than on a chronological or historical framework. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

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NURS211

Introduction to Professional Nursing

(3,0) 3

This course introduces the student to a theoretical foundation for professional nursing practice. It focuses on nursing's historical origin, and its development throughout the years to present. Concepts discussed include nursing and related theories, the nursing process, legal/ethical issues and other topics relevant to the practice of professional nursing. Prerequisite: permission of dean or instructor only.

NURS212

Health Appraisal

(2,6) 4

This course serves as an introduction to the nursing assessment and analysis component of the nursing process as a method of determining a well individual's health potential and status across the lifespan. Emphasis is on obtaining and documenting a health history, performing a nursing assessment and beginning to formulate a nursing diagnosis. Prerequisite: permission of dean or instructor only.

NURS213

Fundamentals of Nursing

(3,9) 6

This course provides a theoretical and clinical foundation upon which science is applied to clients experiencing common health stressors. Emphasis is placed upon collecting relevant data, formulating nursing diagnosis based on the data, implementation of both appropriate nursing interventions and related psychomotor nursing skills. Responsibilities as a health team member who displays caring behaviors and as a self-directed learner are also considered. Prerequisites: NURS211, 212, and HLTH208. Pre- or corequisites: HLTH232, 209 and BIOL223.

NURS222

Transition Course: Nursing Concepts

(3,0) 3

This course assists articulating students from Sault College's two-year Practical Nursing diploma program (or equivalent) who are enrolling in the pre-licensure BSN program to assimilate/integrate philosophical concepts, knowledge, skills, issues and values inherent within professional nursing and the nursing program at Lake Superior State University.

NURS290

Directed Study in Nursing

(1-2,0) 1-2

Special study of nursing topic tailored to student interest and need. Prerequisite: minimal sophomore status. May be repeated for maximum of four credits.

NURS325

Nursing of Childbearing Families

(3,6) 5

Theoretical and clinical foundation for application of the nursing process in caring for childbearing families. Focus on: Norms and complications of the childbirth experience with application of strategies to promote health and prevent complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Prerequisites of NURS213 (or 222), HLTH209 & BIOL223.

NURS326

Nursing of Children and Families

(3,6) 5

Theoretical and clinical foundation for application of nursing process in caring for children and their families. Emphasis: health promotion, maintenance and restoration with application of principles and concepts related to growth and development, family theory, environmental influences on health and the nursing process. Prerequisites: HLTH328, 352 and NURS327 Co-requisite: NURS325.

NURS327

Adult Nursing I

(4,12) 8

Combined class and clinical experiences that apply the concepts of nursing and related theories to the care of the adult client with common health alterations in each of the basic human need areas. Nursing clinical experiences are in primary, secondary and tertiary care settings for adult clients. Prerequisites of NURS213 (or 222), HLTH209, BIOL223. Corequisite of HLTH/NURS352.

NURS328

Multicultural Approaches to Health Care

(3,0) 3

This course explores values, beliefs and practices related to health behaviors in a variety of culturally diverse groups. Methods for fostering culturally sensitive care are explored. Content includes communication, biological and nutritional considerations, assessment techniques and alternative/complementary health practices. Prerequisite: SOCY101. Also listed as HLTH328.

NURS352

Health Issues of Aging Populations

(3,0) 3

This course is designed to assist students from a variety of disciplines to gain a greater understanding of health-related issues that are associated with advancing age. In addition to exploring physiological and psychological changes experienced by our elderly clients, students will learn how they can adapt their work strategies to work more effectively for the elderly clients that they serve. Prerequisites: PSYC155 and junior level status. Also listed as HLTH352.

NURS360

Professional Nursing Concepts

(4,0) 4

This four-credit course is the transitional course into professional nursing for the practicing registered nurse. Course emphasis: concepts of professional nursing, nursing and other related theories, health promotion, using research in nursing practice, impact of technology on profession, and economics related to nursing care. Includes: the history of nursing, ethics, culture, and critical thinking are interwoven in the exploration of concepts. Prerequisite: Permission of dean or instructor only. For Post Licensure majors (RN-BSN) only.

NURS363

Comprehensive Health Appraisal

(2,3) 3

Application of theories from nursing and related fields to appraise health of the individual throughout the lifespan. Emphasis is on comprehensive history taking, physical assessment skills and assessment of findings. For Post Licensure majors (RN-BSN) only. Pre- or corequisite: NURS360.

NURS365

Family Nursing Theory

(3,0) 3

Theoretical concepts of family development, structure and dynamics are presented. Factors influencing family health care are examined. Strategies are developed to enhance healthy family functioning. For Post Licensure majors (RN-BSN) only. Pre- or corequisites: SOCY101 and NURS360.

NURS431

Adult Nursing II

(4,12) 8

This is a theory and clinical laboratory course focusing on application of the nursing process in care of the adult client with multiple health stressors. Basic human needs theory and concepts of stress/adaptation, health promotion, health maintenance, health restoration and teaching-learning are applied. The student collaborates with the health team and applies theory and principles of leadership and management in providing care in secondary and tertiary care settings. Prerequisites: HLTH328, 352, and NURS325, 327 and 326. Corequisite: NURS435.

NURS432

Nursing of Populations

(3,6) 5

This is a theory and clinical course applying the nursing process to populations. Content includes application of public health nursing principles, levels of prevention, epidemiology and health education. Expands the role of the nurse as a teacher, collaborator and advocate. Examines the effect of health care delivery trends and issues on the health of populations. For Pre Licensure BSN majors, prerequisites: HLTH328, 352, and NURS325, 327 & 326. For Post Licensure majors, prerequisites are: NURS363 and 365.

NURS433

Community Mental Health Nursing

(3,6) 5

Theoretical and clinical foundation in mental health nursing. Emphasis is on the use of the therapeutic relationship and communication skills to help clients cope with stressors of life experiences. Nursing, human needs theory and stress adaptation theory are used to help the client achieve optimum level of mental health. Clinical experiences are provided in both the community and in the acute care settings. Prerequisites: HLTH328, 352 and NURS325, 326, 327.

NURS434

Nursing Research

(3,0) 3

This course develops appraisal skills of nursing and related research. It will enable students to think critically and ethically about providing the best possible care to clients based on evidence. Assignments and class discussion emphasize application of current research to a variety of dimensions including human beings, health, nursing and environment. Prerequisites: HLTH328, 352, and NURS325, 327 and 326, MATH207 or PSYC210.

NURS435

Management in Nursing

(4,0) 4

Analysis of the leadership and management roles in professional nursing; focus is leadership/management theories basic to the planning, organizing, directing and controlling of nursing services in health care settings. Includes concepts of nursing model integration in management, communications, decision making and conflict resolution, resource management, legal and ethical responsibilities, employee relations, health care system design, systems appraisal, and case management. Students will formulate a personal nursing management/leadership philosophy. For Pre Licensure BSN majors, prerequisites are: HLTH328, 352 and NURS325, 327, 326. Co-requisite: NURS431.

NURS436

Contemporary Issues in Nursing

(2,0) 2

Course analyzes contemporary and future issues involving the professional nurse. The course further explores role socialization from nursing student to BSN-prepared nurse. Course reviews the legal responsibilities and professional regulation of nursing practice. Selected social, ethical, political, economic and legal issues will be examined. For Pre Licensure BSN majors, prerequisites are: HLTH328, 352 and NURS325, 327, 326. For Post Licensure majors (RN-BSN), prerequisite is NURS360.

NURS437

Professional Nursing Leadership

(1,3) 2

This is a seminar and clinical course where the student is expected to synthesize the roles of professional nursing in a variety of settings. Collaborative and leadership aspects of professional nursing are emphasized by the students planning their experience with the faculty member and preceptor. Integration of ethics, research, change, caring, advocacy, and approaches to ensure quality care in nursing practice are expected. For Post Licensure majors (RN-BSN) only. Prerequisites: NURS432, 434, 435.

NURS451

Critical Care Nursing

(3,0) 3

Assists student in developing nursing knowledge essential to care of critically ill client/family. Health promotion maintenance and restoration interventions are stressed in care of clients with severe alterations in basic human needs. Prerequisite: NURS431 or graduate nurse.

NURS490

Independent Study

(1-4,0) 1-4

Individual investigation of topics tailored to student interest and need. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and instructor permission.

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OFFC112

Keyboard Skillbuilding

(0,2) 1

Improvement of keyboarding speed and accuracy (both alphabetic and numeric), using developmental programs and keyboarding drills. May be repeated once.

OFFC119

Computerized Accounting Procedures

(4,0) 4

Accounting experiences common to small business or professional offices; development of basic principles underlying accounting procedures; techniques and records used in analyzing, classifying, recording and summarizing transactions; accounting procedures applied to a computer simulation for small businesses. May not be taken for credit following successful completion of ACTG132.

OFFC235

Automated Office Systems

(3,0) 3

Lectures and discussions about effects of new technology on the workplace and the role students are expected to play in the office. Such topics as technology, communications, human relations and customer service techniques will be covered. A practice simulation in either medical office or legal office will also be covered. Prerequisites: Word processing and a grade of C or higher in ENGL111.

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PHIL204

Introduction to Philosophy

(3,0) 3

A study of selected philosophical problems and of methods and ways to answer them. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL205

Logic

(3,0) 3

An introductory course in logic; study of the role of logical methods of the rational approach to knowledge; consideration of such concepts as definition, implication, inference, syllogism, deduction. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL210

Existentialism

(3,0) 3

Survey of existentialist literature from a variety of authors, periods and genres: Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Jaspers, Sartre, Camus, de Beavoir, Rilke, and others. Texts include philosophical prose, biblical exegesis, fiction, drama and poetry, containing many of the definitive expressions of such current literary, philosophical and artistic themes as the varieties and sources of alienation, the creation and definition of the self, the nature and rationality of religious faith, moral responses to insoluble dilemmas, and potential individual responses to an absurd and inhuman world. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL215

Ethical Theory and Practice

(3,0) 3

Certain actions seem to be demanded by morality and certain actions seem to be prohibited by morality. In addition, there are many actions in which we have difficulty extending praise or blame. The study of Ethical Theory constitutes the study of philosophers' evaluations of behavior, character, and even the terms of such evaluation (e.g., 'goodness,' 'value,' 'right,' and 'obligation'). This course will examine the ethical theories of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Bentham, and Mill as well as contemporary applications of ethical theories. Topics such as terrorism, ethics in the professions, the environment, and religiously motivated behavior art timely and appropriate topics for evaluating the connections between moral reasoning and our modes of living. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL220

Biomedical Ethics

(3,0) 3

Survey of contemporary issues in medical and research ethics. Topics could include abortion, euthanasia, genetic testing, reproductive technologies, doctor-patient relationships, conflicting imperatives on confidentiality and disclosure, social consequences or drug development and widespread use, concepts of health and disease, gender and medical practice, the distribution of medical resources, and the medicalization of various forms of social deviance. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL250

Philosophy of Religion

(3,0) 3

This course examines the rational foundations for believing in a worshiping a Diety. In particular we will focus our inquiry on the God of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam who is thought to possess the qualities of omniscience, omnipotence, and beneficence. (We will, however, exposit the deities Hinduism and Buddhism to put our study in context.) Can we prove that God exists? What might we owe God? How can we explain the existence of evil even though God is thought to be wholly good? What place does religion have in a pluralistic society? The history of Western Philosophy is in large part unified by the common pursuit of such questions. Not only are the questions themselves fascinating and perplexing, but also, they have been answered in inventive ways by many extraordinary thinkers. The Philosophy of Religion is, therefore, a continuing search that has as much to do with human ingenuity as it does about God. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL302

Ancient Western Philosophy

(3,0) 3

A study of the origins and the development of Greek and Roman philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the early Christians. Counts as humanities credit for general education requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL305

Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

(3,0) 3

Students will become familiar with the arguments and ideas that have sought to describe and, in many cases, to shape the consciousness of the modern and postmodern epochs. From Descartes to Kant, modern philosophy experimented with new ways to understand existence, identity, causality, and God. From Russell to Williams, contemporary philosophers grappled with new ways to understand logic, ethics, gender, and subjective experience. Students will learn to make connections between their own ways of experiencing the world and the sometimes subtle ways that philosophers since Descartes have influenced their understanding of their experiences. Prerequisite: ENGL111.

PHIL490

Directed Study in Philosophy

(1-4) 1-4

A study of philosophically engaging topic, chosen by instructor and student. Essays and tutorial session required. Prerequisites: At least six credits of philosophy courses, evidence that the student is capable of carrying out independent study, and approval of instructor. This course may be repeated for up to six credits, or three times, whichever occurs first.

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PHYS221

Principles of Physics I

(3,2) 4

General principles of rigid body mechanics (kinematics, forces, laws of motion, energy, momentum, rotation) and fluid mechanics. Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and one-half year of high school trigonometry with a math ACT score of 27 or better; or MATH108 and 111; or 140.

PHYS222

Principles of Physics II

(3,2) 4

Thermodynamics, vibrations and waves, electricity and magnetism, light, optics, relativity and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS221 with a grade of C or better.

PHYS224

Topics in Physics for Electrical Technology

(3,2) 4

Vibrations and waves, optics, relativity and modern physics (identical to PHYS222). Electricity and magnetism topics of particular relevance to electronic engineering technology. Prerequisites: PHYS221 with a grade of C or better, and sophomore standing in EET course work. Pre- or co-requisite MATH140.

PHYS231

Applied Physics for Engineers and Scientists I

(3,2) 4

An introductory course in rigid body mechanics and fluid mechanics using calculus with emphasis on practical applications. Intended primarily for students of engineering, physical science and mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH151.

PHYS232

Applied Physics for Engineers and Scientists II

(3,2) 4

Continuation of PHYS231. Introduction to thermal physics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Prerequisite: PHYS231 with a grade of C or better.

PHYS290

Independent Study in Physics

(1-4,0) 1-4

Special studies and/or research in physics for individuals or small seminar groups. Course content to be arranged with instructor and with approval of the school chair. This course may be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher and permission of instructor.

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PNUR101

Introduction to Practical Nursing I

(2,0) 2

This course provides introductory information required for successful college study. Additionally, the course provides the foundational information for the practical nursing program. Concepts include practical nursing philosophy and conceptual framework, history of nursing, nursing's Code of Ethics, and the role of nursing in the health care system with emphasis on the practical nurse. Prerequisite: Permission of dean or instructor only.

PNUR102

Drugs and Dosages

(2,3) 3

This course introduces the practical nurse student to dosage calculations and medication administration. Calculations for conversion between systems of measurement is covered. The five rights of medication administration is emphasized. Categories of drugs, their actions, side effects and nursing implications are covered. Prerequisite: Admission to the Practical Nursing Program; MATH083 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent placement score.

PNUR104

Introduction to Practical Nursing II

(2,0) 2

Introduction to Practical Nursing II provides a theoretical foundation for practicing nursing care of adults within a variety of health care settings. Concepts such as nursing process, therapeutic communication, culture, and critical thinking are emphasized. This course builds on PNUR101. Prerequisites: Permission of dean or instructor only, BIOL105 or BIOL122, PNUR101 all with a grade of C or better.

PNUR107

Understanding Clinical Nutrition Lab for Practical Nurses

(0,3) 1

This lab course is focused on the knowledge and skill practical nurses need to support the nutritional needs of people across the lifespan with a special emphasis on individuals with limited ability to meet their own nutritional needs. Strategies of providing nutrition associated with self care deficits are covered, including effective oral feeding techniques, use of thickeners or texture to enhance swallowing, tube feeding, and the principles of enceric feeding, elemental diets, IV therapy and hyper alimentation are presented. Prerequisites: BIOL105 or BIOL122 passed with a C or better; HLTH208 passed with a C or better or corequisite of HLTH208.

PNUR113

Fundamentals of Practical Nursing

(4,9) 7

Students will learn the basic skills necessary to provide safe, competent care of the acute and chronically ill residents in Long Term Care/Nursing Home settings. Focus will be on the care of the elderly. Through lecture, lab simulations, and actual clinical experiences the student will learn basic nursing skills, infection control, safety/emergency procedures, nursing interventions and apply communication/interpersonal skills to promote resident's independence, to respect residents' rights, and to recognize abnormal changes in the resident. Prerequisites: MATH083 or equivalent, BIOL105 or 122, PNUR101, all with a grade of C or better.

PNUR201

Medical Surgical Practical Nursing

(6,12) 10

This course focuses on nursing care of the adult client experiencing common stressors affecting health. Emphasis is placed on the administration of medications, collection and communication of relevant data, and implementation of basic nursing interventions. Prerequisites: PNUR113, 104, 102 and PSYC155, all with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: HLTH208.

PNUR202

Legal/Ethical Issues in Practical Nursing

(2,0) 2

This course focuses on the ethical and legal responsibilities and issues related to the safe practice of practical nursing. The role of the practical nurse and within the health care community is emphasized. Licensure responsibilities, career advancement and lifelong learning needs are incorporated. Prerequisite: PNUR201 with a grade of C or better.

PNUR203

OB Practical Nursing

(3,6) 5

This course explores the cycles of life, beginning with the reproductive cycle, conception, fetal development, labor, birth, the postpartum woman, and needs and care of the newborn. At risk pregnancies and complications are identified. Emphasis is placed on the family as the client. Prerequisite: PNUR201 with a grade of C or better.

PNUR204

Pediatric Practical Nursing

(3,6) 5

In this course, the nursing process is used to address well-defined health problems common to children. Normal child growth and development, immunization needs and health risk factors for children are emphasized. Children's responses to illness and methods of evaluating children's needs are covered. Prerequisite: PNUR201 with a grade of C or better.

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POLI110

Introduction to American Government and Politics

(4,0) 4

An introductory survey of American national government and politics.

POLI120

Introduction to Legal Processes

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the nature and characteristics of law as it operates in the United States: structure and function of the judiciary, process of litigation, influences on law, and impact and enforcement of judicial decisions.

POLI130

Introduction to State and Local Government

(4,0) 4

A study of the politics and organization of state and local governments, with an emphasis on specific policy issues such as education, criminal justice and economic development.

POLI160

Introduction to Canadian Government and Politics

(3,0) 3

An introductory survey of Canadian government and politics.

POLI201

Introduction to Public Administration

(3,0) 3

This course provides an overview of the field of public administration. It examines the types of organizations, the relation of administration to politics and public management.

POLI211

Political Science Research and Statistics

(4,0) 4

An introduction to research methods and statistical applications in political science and public administration. Among other research methods, the course examines survey research, content analysis, experimental design and analysis of existing data. Introduces students to the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics, up through correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

POLI222

Introduction to the Legal Profession

(3,0) 3

Students will become familiar with how the law functions, how the legal profession has evolved, how to prepare for and apply to law school, how law schools differ from college (including development of various methods and techniques to study the law). In addition, students will become aware of the legal profession and its demands, opportunities, options and trends. Prerequisites: POLI110, sophomore standing and/or permission of instructor. Also listed as LAWS222.

POLI234

Women and Politics Around the World

(4,0) 4

This course will examine a broad range of issues involving gender and politics: the political participation of women, the history of women\'s movements, voting differences, political divisions among women, and the present political status of women in the United States and globally.

POLI234

Women and Politics around the World

(3,0) 3

This course will examine a broad range of issues involving gender and politics: the political participation of women, the history of women's movements, voting differences, political divisions among women, and the present political status of women in the United States and globally.

POLI241

Introduction to International Relations

(4,0) 4

An introductory study of the factors that influence the conduct of international relations and of the various methods by which those relations are conducted. This material will then be applied to an examination of some appropriate current international controversies.

POLI247

Model United Nations

(2,0) 2

This course includes required participation in the model United Nations program, in which students represent specific countries and become familiar with their background and politics. The goal is an understanding of how the United Nations functions. May be repeated for up to a total of four credits, but no more than two credits may be counted toward a political science major or minor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLI290

Research Topics in Political Science

(1-4,0) 1-4

This may take the form of either a research project or a program of directed reading on a specific topic. One to four credits over a period of one or two semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student's project. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLI301

Policy Analysis and Evaluation

(4,0) 4

Examines how public issues and problems are analyzed to assist in the development of public policies. Considers the process of evaluating public programs to determine whether they are to be expanded, cut back or continued at the current level. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

POLI325

Politics and Media

(3,0) 3

Examines the impact of electronic and print media on contemporary American politics. Evaluates proposals for changing the method and role of media coverage of government and politics. Prerequisites: POLI110 and junior standing.

POLI331

Comparative Politics of Western Europe and Russia

(4,0) 4

Institutions and functioning of government in major European states, such as Great Britain, France, Germany and Russia. Prerequisite: POLI110.

POLI334

Middle East Politics

(3,0) 3

An examination of government and politics in the Middle East, with special emphasis on the influences of Islam and nationalism on both international and domestic politics of the area. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

POLI335

European Union Politics

(4,0) 4

The primary aim of this course is to provide in-depth knowledge of the institutions and politics of the European Union. The course provides a general overview of the "State of the Union" from an empirical (rather than theoretical) perspective. We shall use articles from the comparative and international politics literature, along with some legal materials to make sense of the institutional and policy issues facing the European Union. It should be emphasized that no knowledge of international legal processes is needed for the course. Prerequisite: POLI110.

POLI340

Politics in Multicultural Societies

(3,0) 3

An examination of nationalism and other forms of political conflict arising from ethnic, racial, linguistic and religious differences in comparative perspective. Prerequisites: POLI110 or 160 and junior standing.

POLI342

International Environmental Policy

(3,0) 3

This course is intended to familiarize students with the efforts of the international community to establish policy guidelines designed to begin the regulation of the global environment. The course covers basic concepts to international relations necessary to understand the general workings of the nation-state system. It then begins an exploration of significant historical international environmental issues and the ways in which these have been dealt with by the international community. The course further challenges students by investigating various alternative solutions for solving the myriad of global environmental problems faced by all of humankind in the new century.

POLI351

Political Philosophy I

(4,0) 4

An examination of political philosophy from the ancient Greeks through the Reformation, concentrating on Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas and Machiavelli. Prerequisites: POLI110 and junior or senior standing.

POLI352

Political Philosophy II

(4,0) 4

An examination of political philosophy from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century, concentrating on Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Burke, Bentham, Mill, Hegel, and Marx. The course includes analysis of the period's main ideologies: Conservatism, liberalism, socialism, communism, anarchism, fascism and national socialism. Prerequisites: POLI110 and junior or senior standing.

POLI357

Politics of Violence

(3,0) 3

An interdisciplinary examination of the origin, nature and consequences of political violence, including war, revolution and terrorism. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. May also be used for sociology credit.

POLI364

Political Parties, Interest Groups and Public Opinion

(3,0) 3

Examines the roles of political parties and interest groups in the American political system, especially in elections and lobbying activities. The formation and uses of public opinion are also analyzed. Prerequisite: POLI110.

POLI367

Congress and the Presidency

(4,0) 4

Examines the legislative and executive branches of government as parts of the policy-making process. Prerequisite: POLI110.

POLI401

Principles of Public Administration

(3,0) 3

Examines major issues and methods in public administration. Analysis of specific public policy issues. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

POLI411

U.S. Foreign Policy

(3,0) 3

A study of the formulation and conduct of American foreign policy. Analysis of relevant factors, institutions which influence the formulation and conduct of policy; and an examination of selected foreign policies. Prerequisite: POLI110.

POLI413

The International Legal Order

(4,0) 4

The primary objective of this course is to explore the reasons for the emergence of the international legal order as a crucial constraint on the freedom of action of national governments; that is, to understand the impact of the international legal order on contemporary international relations. It also seeks to introduce the substance of international law in selected issue-areas, and to provide an overview of the nature of international legal reasoning. Throughout the course, we shall emphasize the interaction of law and politics, and of national and transnational legal processes. Prerequisite: POLI110.

POLI420

Politics of the World Economy

(4,0) 4

Power conflict at the international economic level and its impact on the politics of various nations, states, regions and interests. Prerequisites: POLI110 or 160, and junior standing, as well as either ECON201 or 202. POLI241 recommended but not required.

POLI463

Seminar in Political Science

(1-3,0) 1-3

A reading and discussion seminar dealing with selected topics in political science. Course may be repeated with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

POLI467

Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties

(4,0) 4

Principles of the American Constitution: separation of powers, federalism, the powers of the national and state governments, and limitations on the exercise of these powers as well as principles of the American Constitution respecting civil rights and liberties, The Bill of Rights, equal protection of the laws, citizenship and suffrage, and limitations on the exercise of those rights. Prerequisite: POLI120 or its equivalent.

POLI490

Independent Study in Political Science

(1-3) 1-3

Independent research or directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLI491

Senior Seminar I

(4,0) 4

The first course in a capstone sequence required of all political science majors. The course examines the history of political science and public administration and reviews contemporary approaches and recent research. Students prepare a research proposal to be carried out in POLI492. Prerequisites: Political science major and senior standing.

POLI492

Senior Seminar II

(4,0) 4

Completion of the research project begun in POLI491. Students will make oral presentations of their project results at the end of the course to other students, faculty and invited guests. Prerequisite: POLI491.

POLI499

Political Science/Public Administration Internship

(1,9 - 27) 3-9

Students arrange, with the assistance and approval of the instructor, a supervised work experience in a governmental, community or nonprofit organization. Students perform professional tasks under the supervision of agency personnel. The students' review and evaluation of the work experience is under the direction of the instructor. Permission of the instructor required by the seventh week of the preceding semester. Course may be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.

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PSYC101

Introduction to Psychology

(4,0) 4

A general introduction to the systematic study of behavior and mental processes in humans and animals.

PSYC155

Lifespan Development

(3,0) 3

Human psychological development from birth to death. This course covers social, emotional and intellectual development across the lifespan.

PSYC201

Communication Skills in Counseling

(2,1) 3

This course covers the essential elements of establishing a therapeutic relationship, including active listening skills, empathy and confrontation. Students both explore their potential to be congruent and authentic as counselors and demonstrate counseling skills with voluntary, involuntary and crisis counselors. No prerequisite.

PSYC210

Statistics

(3,0) 3

Introduction to basic statistical methods of analyzing psychological data. Emphasis is placed on statistical inference, e.g., t-tests, F-tests and selected non-parametric tests. This course provides students with basic statistical concepts and skills necessary for laboratory and survey work, and for understanding psychological literature, and introduces them to statistical analysis on the computer. MATH207 may be used in place of PSYC210 to meet the psychology major and minor requirements. Prerequisite: MATH086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

PSYC212

Experimental Psychology

(3,2) 4

An examination of the basic research methods employed in the social sciences with emphasis on the experiment. Topics: Epistemology, laboratory experiments, field experiments, survey construction, correlational research. Students will each participate as a subject and an experimenter, collect data, analyze data, and write a laboratory report according to the editorial style of the American Psychological Association. Laboratory assignments require use of computer applications for experimental purposes, including running experiments and collecting data, analyzing results, creation of appropriate figures, and communication of results in text and oral presentations with slides. Prerequisites: PSYC101 and either PSYC210 or MATH207.

PSYC217

Social Psychology

(3,0) 3

Topics include attitude formation and change, interpersonal attraction, aggression, altruism, conformity and environmental psychology.

PSYC228

Organizational Behavior

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the theories, principles and practices of organizational behavior within the workplace. May be used for sociology credit.

PSYC240

Behavior Management

(3,0) 3

Systematic introduction to behavioral concepts and techniques. Self-management applications and behavioral assessments in applied settings serve as practical lab experiences.

PSYC259

Abnormal Psychology

(3,0) 3

This course is a systematic investigation of the identification, dynamics and treatment of deviant and maladaptive behavior.

PSYC265

Child and Adolescent Development

(3,0) 3

Psychological development of the child through adolescence. Social, emotional and intellectual development are covered, with consideration of genetic, prenatal and postnatal influences. Prerequisite: PSYC101, 155 or EDUC150.

PSYC291

Group Counseling

(3,0) 3

This course examines the theory, techniques and practice of group counseling. Students will become familiar with basic group process, theoretical perspectives and their application to group counseling. Prerequisite: PSYC201.

PSYC301

Exceptional Child and Adolescent

(3,0) 3

The study of physically, intellectually and socially exceptional children and adolescents, including their characteristics and unique educational needs. Prerequisite: PSYC155 or 265.

PSYC311

Learning and Motivation

(3,0) 3

An introduction to the theory and research of learning. Factors are examined that influence the acquisition and performance of behaviors in classical and instrumental learning paradigms. Prerequisite: PSYC212.

PSYC357

Personality Theory

(3,0) 3

This course surveys the major psychological theories used to conceptualize, treat and research personality issues. Prerequisite: 12 hours of psychology.

PSYC383

Industrial Psychology

(3,0) 3

The principles of human behavior in the industrial situation are studied with particular emphasis given to scientific methods of selecting, utilizing, and evaluating a work force in ways consistent with the well-being of the individual worker. Prerequisites: PSYC101 and 210.

PSYC385

Health Psychology

(3,0) 3

This course covers psychoneuroimmunology and stress as they impact on human health and disease as well as psychological interventions which promote physical well being and healing. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

PSYC391

Family Therapy

(3,0) 3

This course applies a systems framework to the understanding of family dynamics and introduces structural perspectives and modalities for family intervention. Prerequisites: PSYC101 and junior standing.

PSYC396

Tests and Measurements

(3,0) 3

This course has two parts. Part one covers measurement theory, the properties of the normal curve, reliability, validity and measurement statistics. Part two reviews major tests used by researchers, educators, clinicians, counselors, addictions counselors and industrial psychologists. Prerequisite: SOCY302 or PSYC210 or MATH207 or equivalent.

PSYC456

History and Systems of Psychology

(3,0) 3

An examination of persons, events, theories, schools and systems that influenced and define contemporary psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC311.

PSYC457

Cognition

(3,0) 3

A survey of recent findings on cognition in humans. Topics include learning, memory, problem solving, language and complex perceptual processes. Prerequisite: PSYC311.

PSYC459

Physiological Psychology

(3,0) 3

This course is an introduction to the neurophysiological structures of the brain and their functions as regulators of animal and human behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC311.

PSYC490

Research Topics in Psychology

(1-4) 1-4

This may take the form of either a research project or a program of directed reading on a specific topic. One to four credits over a period of one or two semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student's project. May be repeated up to a total of six credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC495

Senior Research Practicum

(0,3) 3

A practicum under the guidance of a faculty mentor. The student will conduct an empirical research project based on the proposal submitted by the student in PSYC498. Prerequisite: PSYC498. Corequisite: PSYC499.

PSYC498

Senior Research I

(3,0) 3

The study of methods employed in gathering data for research purposes including direct observational techniques and self-report measures. Students will also learn to use the computer to gather data, analyze data and present data graphically; and will develop a research prospectus. Prerequisites: PSYC210, 212 and 311.

PSYC499

Senior Research II

(1,0) 1

Issues in the development and implementation of an empirical research project, including design, statistical analyses, ethical review, and modes of presentation. Prerequisite: PSYC498. Corequisite: PSCY495.

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READ091

Preparation for College Reading

(3,0) 3

Introduces reading strategies and study skills necessary for college success. Through integration of acquired knowledge and reading practice, students will develop strategies for vocabulary expansion, comprehension, critical thinking, and increase reading rate. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to pass the course. Credit received in this course does not count toward graduation. Prerequisites: none.

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RECA103

Badminton and Racquetball

(0,2) 1

This course will serve to introduce the student to two racquet sports: Racquetball and badminton. The course will offer each sport for 7.5 weeks and then the student will rotate to the other racquet sport.

RECA105

Bowling

(0,2) 1

This course will emphasize delivery, scoring etiquette, strategies for converting spares, spot vs. pin bowling, and learning about handicapping. The course will involve theory as well as practical experience.

RECA106

Backpacking

(0,2) 1

Introduction to equipment, safety precautions, environmental concerns and skills needed to successfully backpack. Class will experience a weekend backpacking trip.

RECA107

Canoe Techniques

(0,2) 1

This course will introduce the student to the basic strokes and canoe safety associated with flat water canoeing.

RECA108

Outdoor Survival

(0,2) 1

This class will focus on the appropriate strategies to employ to avoid a survival situation. It will also expose the student to various techniques and strategies to employ should they find themselves "lost" or unexpectedly spending several days and nights in the out-of-doors.

RECA109

Rock Climbing and Rappelling

(0,2) 1

This course will introduce the student to the components associated with top rope climbing and rappelling. The student will become familiar with equipment, knots, setting up a safe site, terminology and technique.

RECA110

Golf

(0,2) 1

This course is designed to provide the beginning golfer with the fundamentals of the activity and to further play as a lifetime recreational activity.

RECA114

Self Defense

(0,2) 1

This course is designed to introduce the student to the philosophy, concepts and various strategies associated with the martial arts. Physical and mental conditioning and physical techniques associated with the art of self defense will be presented and practiced.

RECA119

Cross Country Skiing

(0,2) 1

This course will introduce the student to the sport of cross country skiing. Emphasis will be placed on basic skill development, equipment selection, maintenance of equipment and the enjoyment of winter and the beauty it has to offer. The majority of class time will be spent skiing; class instruction will occur during the ski, usually on a one-to-one basis to meet the needs of the student.

RECA120

Downhill Skiing and Snowboarding

(0,2) 1

The students will be provided with an opportunity to learn the basic fundamentals of downhill skiing and snowboarding and to gain sufficient knowledge of the sport so they may continue to enjoy and improve for the rest of their lives.

RECA125

Tennis

(0,2) 1

This course is intended to develop each student's present knowledge and skills in order that they will be able to pursue tennis as a lifetime leisure activity.

RECA127

Volleyball

(0,2) 1

This course is designed to develop basic skills and progression in power volleyball. Conditioning, drill, game tactics and rules will be practically applied.

RECA129

Basketball

(0,2) 1

This course is designed to expand each student's present knowledge and skill specific to skill execution, game play, game strategy and rules. May not be repeated for credit. Not available for credit to any student/athlete playing intercollegiate basketball.

RECA130

Intercollegiate Sports Skills

(0,2) 1

Will meet as directed by instructor. The course is designed for student-athletes involved in intercollegiate athletics. It provides the opportunity to develop advanced skills in their respective sports. The course may be taken two times for a total of two credits. It may be taken only once per academic year and only during the term in which the student-athlete is participating in an intercollegiate sport.

RECA150

Individualized Physical Fitness

(0,2) 1

This class is designed to enable the student to discover his or her own level of fitness and develop and implement an exercise program that will address personal fitness concerns. Central to this process is introducing the student to various aspects of a balanced fitness program and providing personal assistance to the student in selecting beginning fitness goals and appropriate progression of those goals.

RECA151

Jogging and Walking for Fitness

(0,2) 1

Introduction to jogging and walking as means of developing physical and mental fitness. Development of an activity ideal for lifetime leisure involvement.

RECA152

Orienteering

(0,2) 1

The focus of this class will be to introduce the student to map and compass reading skills and techniques associated with coordinating their use. It will also introduce the student to the competitive sport of orienteering.

RECA153

Weight Training

(0,2) 1

This class is designed to familiarize each student with basic weight training knowledge. The student will become familiar with muscular systems, functions, and safe and effective ways to organize and implement a weight training routine.

RECA154

Yoga

(0,2) 1

This course will cover the history, theory principles and benefits contraindications and methods of yoga as well as the application of yoga asanas, breathing techniques and relaxation method.

RECA160

Adapted Activities

(0,2) 1

Leisure activities adapted to meet the needs of students with disabilities. Emphasis on walking, jogging and aquatics. (May be repeated for credit.)

RECA173

Social Dance

(0,2) 1

This course is designed to provide participants with a broad range of dancing patterns and rhythmic skills. Through social interaction, the following social dances will be learned: Mixers, round dance, square dance and ballroom dance.

RECA174

Aerobic Dance

(0,2) 1

This course will provide the student with an opportunity to become involved in a structured aerobic dance program. The purpose of this type of programming is to improve an individual's physical fitness through rhythmic and dance activities.

RECA175

Step Aerobics

(0,2) 1

A step workout is a high-intensity, low-impact aerobic workout for all fitness levels. The principle is to step up and down on a platform while simultaneously performing upper-body exercises. The program will work every major muscle group in the lower body, while training the upper body.

RECA180

Beginning Skating

(0,2) 1

The students will be provided with an opportunity to learn the basic fundamentals of skating and to gain sufficient knowledge of the sport so that they may continue to enjoy and improve for the rest of their lives.

RECA190

Aquatic Fitness

(0,2) 1

This course will introduce students to developing cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and muscular endurance through aquatic activities as an alternative to weight bearing forms of exercise. Water related exercises and activities will be utilized to improve physical fitness. Individuals of all fitness levels will enjoy getting fit in the water.

RECA194

Scuba

(0,2) 1

This course is designed to introduce the student to the appropriate and safe use of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus.

RECA195

Beginning and Advanced Beginning Swimming

(0,2) 1

Course meets in pool two hours a week. Mostly lab work but some lecture. Students cover material in Red Cross beginner and advanced beginner courses and receive certification in one or both depending on skill level attained.

RECA196

Intermediate and Advanced Swimming

(0,2) 1

Course meets in pool two hours a week. Mostly lab work but some lecture. Students cover material in Red Cross Intermediate and Swimmer courses and receive certification in one or both depending on skill level attained. Prerequisite: Red Cross advanced beginner certification or equivalent skills.

RECA210

Lifeguarding

(0,4) 2

Course meets in pool four hours a week. Mostly lab work, some lecture. Students cover material in Red Cross Basic and Emergency Water Safety course and Red Cross Lifeguarding course. Students receive certification in one or both depending on skill level attained. Either certificate qualifies students to take water safety and lifeguarding Instructor course, RECA211. Prerequisite: Red Cross intermediate swimming certificate or equivalent skills.

RECA211

Water Safety and Lifeguard Instructor

(0,4) 2

Course meets four hours a week, 70 percent of the time in the pool and 30 percent of the time in the classroom. All students cover material in Red Cross water safety instructor course and do a teaching practicum at the Lake Superior State University pool. Those students entering with a current lifeguarding card may also cover lifeguarding instructor material. Prerequisites: Current Emergency Water Safety or Lifeguarding certificate.

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RECS101

Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services

(3,0) 3

Overview of philosophy, history, theory, programs, professional leadership and organizations, economics and leisure service delivery systems.

RECS105

Program Development and Leadership

(3,0) 3

Principles of leadership skills and styles are applied to various recreation settings with emphasis on group interaction and face-to-face leading. Programming fundamentals for effective leisure services delivery are explored and implemented. Also listed as EXER105.

RECS212

Instructional Methods in Adapted Aquatics

(1,2) 2 alternate years

Based on American Red Cross adapted aquatics guidelines, the course is designed to help students develop skills used when planning, implementing, instructing, and evaluating water activity programs for those with a disability. Current water safety instructors (WSI) may become American Red Cross certified as adapted aquatics instructors. People who do not have a WSI may become American Red Cross certified adapted aquatics aides.

RECS220

Methods in Arts and Crafts

(3,0) 3 alternate years

A variety of arts and crafts media are studied and applied to specific recreation settings with concentration on leading and programming. Prerequisites: RECS101 and 105.

RECS262

Outdoor Recreation

(3,0) 3

This course will introduce the student to a variety of topics and content areas related to outdoor recreation. These topics will include outdoor education, organized camping and adventure education. Also included will be an opportunity to become familiar with outdoor living skills. Prerequisite: RECS105.

RECS270

Sports Management

(3,0) 3 alternate years

This course will provide philosophies, organization techniques and administration principles for youth sports, officiating, intramurals, organized athletics and recreational sports. Issues on assessment, design, implementation, and evaluation for sports programs in today\'s society will be explored. Investigation of appropriate resources, professional organization\'s impact, training methods, certification processes and gender issues will be highlighted.

RECS280

Readiness in Games, Activities and Sports

(3,0) 3 alternate years

This course will focus on the selection and implementation of games, activities and sports which are age-appropriate for the clientele being served. Psychological, sociological, emotional and physiological readiness will be studied as it relates to implementation, modification and presentation of games, activities, and sports to various age groups. Both positive and negative outcomes will be identified.

RECS295

Practicum

(1-2,0) 1-2

Practical experiences designed to provide the student with various types of recreation programs. The student will work under a site supervisor specialized in that particular area of the student's interest. One credit hour for every 45 hours of practical experience. May be repeated for up to four credits. Prerequisite: Instructor permission

RECS320

Dance and Rhythmic Activities for Recreation

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Study of dance in social and therapeutic settings; developing skills to lead programs and adapt a variety of rhythmic activities for individuals and groups: Creative movement, improvisation, variety of social dance, historical significance to actual implementation. Prerequisites: RECS101 and 105.

RECS344

Adapted Sports and Recreation

(3,0) 3

A study of specialized recreational and athletic opportunities available to individuals with illnesses and disabilities. Related associations, equipment, rules and classifications, resources and research will be encountered for a wide range of activities and conditions. When available, practical opportunities will be included as part of the learning process. Prerequisite: junior standing.

RECS360

Facilitation and Interpretation Techniques

(2,2) 3

This course is designed to serve recreation students who are interested in facilitating outdoor or adventure based programs, and/or become interpreters in and outdoor or parks environment. The course will expose the student to a wide variety of facilitation/interpretation methodologies. The student will be involved in both learning and practicing these techniques. Examples of these techniques would include such things as: utilization of the metaphor, and Haiku. This class will also travel to different outdoor facilities, such as outdoor education centers and state historical sites. This will enable the students to facilitate experiences in an environment unavailable to LSSU (example, a High Ropes Course) and to interface with individuals who provide facilitation and interpretation as a part of their professional responsibilities. Prerequisites; RESC105, RECS262.

RECS362

Land Management for Recreation Purposes

(3,0) 3

This course is designed to meet the needs of the student pursuing a parks and recreation degree. Provides insight and understanding for problems inherent to managing recreation lands for optimum use and minimum impact. Also, for recreation majors in outdoor recreation option. Prerequisites: RECS101 and 262, or NSC I103 and EVRN131.

RECS365

Expedition Management

(2,2) 3

Intensive study of performance, programming, leadership and management skills involved in conducting wilderness and back country recreation programming. The student will become aware of various theoretical support structures and paradigms associated with adventure education and the values associated with the use of outdoor programming as a therapeutic intervention modality. Course content includes: Initiating and programming wilderness/back country experiences, group dynamics and outdoor living skills. A ten-day outing is required immediately upon completion of the semester. Prerequisite: RECS262.

RECS367

National Parks, National Monuments and National Culture

(3,0) 3 alternate years

This course will focus on the historical development of national parks and the affiliated National Land Ethic. Included in the presentation will be a study of the social, cultural, aesthetic and economic history which fostered the development of a national attitude that favored the "national park" concept. The course will also emphasize the emergence of national parks in this country as a representative of our national cultural history. The course will trace the historical development of a land ethic. It will also trace an emerging aesthetic awareness of land among people who arrived to this continent from Central Europe during the 1600s. This Central European land ethic will be compared to the land ethic of Native Americans. Both of these will be traced through this country's history and will serve as a basis for anticipating future land management trends and issues.

RECS370

Recreation for the Elderly

(3,0) 3 alternate years

Geared to individuals who will be working with senior citizens in recreation programs, hospitals, nursing homes and family members. The aging process will be studied from the perspective that sound principles will be applied to leading and programming for this growing segment of our population. Prerequisites: RECS101, 105 and 200-level recreation electives; or NURS290 and HLTH352.

RECS375

Commercial Recreation

(3,0) 3 alternate years

An introduction to the scope, characteristics and management aspects of the commercial recreation industry. Substantial coverage of entrepreneurial strategies, economic concepts applied to commercial recreation, steps for creating feasibility studies, and operation management. An in-depth study of specific commercial recreation programs including travel, tourism, hospitality, club, and the entertainment industry will be included with emphasis on present and future trends and career opportunities. Prerequisites: RECS105 or BUSN121, ACTG230, ECON202 and FINC245.

RECS390

Recreation Leader Apprenticeship

(1,0) 1

Practical experience in learning to teach and lead various recreation experiences. Students serve with qualified instructors. Prerequisite: Basic skills and knowledge of activity and instructor permission. May be repeated for a total of three credits.

RECS397

Recreation Studies Junior Research Seminar

(1,0) 1

Introduces the concepts, purpose, methods and function of scholarly research and scientific inquiry. Prerequisites: junior standing, and majoring in recreation management or parks and recreation.

RECS435

Research in Recreation and Leisure Sciences

(3,0) 3

This course will serve as a culminating educational component for the student majoring in therapeutic recreation and recreation management. The course will focus in part on current problems and issues in therapeutic recreation and will also have a major emphasis on developing an original research project. Prerequisites: RECS397 and MATH207, or PSYC210 or comparable statistics course.

RECS437

Recreation Studies Senior Research Seminar

(1,0) 1

The focus of this course is to provide instruction and experience relative to data analysis and presentation methodologies affiliated with conducting research. The students will apply the procedures and methodologies discussed in class directly to their research projects. Prerequisite: RECS435.

RECS450

Philosophy of Human Performance and Leisure

(3,0) 3

A study of the origins and development of leisure behavior, sport, athletics and personal fitness across cultures. Ethical issues such as violence, opportunity, exploitation, role models and equity will be examined. Prerequisites: EXER262 or RECS101 and junior status. Also listed as EXER450.

RECS481

Professional Development Seminar

(1,0) 1

Opportunities for students to refine personal and professional goals and initiate preparation of resumes and interviewing skills. Career planning and placement will be emphasized as well as internship evaluation. Seminar format. Prerequisite: Senior status required.

RECS482

Administration of Recreation and Leisure Services

(4,0) 4

This course will emphasize organizational patterns and administration problems encountered in operating various types of recreation departments and agencies. Additional content will include budgeting, fund raising, grant writing, personnel management and public relations. Prerequisites: RECS105 and junior standing.

RECS492

Internship

2-6

This is a comprehensive practical application of the student's formal academic preparation. Prerequisites: Completion of 20 of the 25 hours of departmental core requirements and junior or senior standing and instructor permission.

RECS496

Selected Research Topics

(1-3,0) 1-3

Student carries out approved project(s) of his/her own initiative. Prerequisite: junior standing and instructor permission.

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SERV100

University Success Strategies

(1,0) 1

Based on assessment of student inventories, students are provided the opportunity to improve their study skills, methods of time management, modes of memorization, note-taking techniques, and university examination preparation. Emphasis is placed on making the transition to university life by focusing on various academic strategies and exposing students to basic information on LSSU programs, policies and procedures.

SERV125

Career Planning and Decision Making

(1,1) 1

Expanding awareness of personal strength and career options, this course will help students make realistic decisions relating to planning and implementation of academic and life career goals. Follows a student self-directed framework utilizing video-tapes and career/self-exploration to complete assignments. Prerequisites: student must be fully admitted for enrollment at LSSU and currently enrolled in six (6) credits.

SERV150

Personal Growth Seminar

(0,1.5) 1

A seminar to help students make the transition to university life, communicate effectively on an interpersonal level, strengthen self-concept and build positive relationships. Course content addresses the personal, social, educational and vocational aspects of individual development.

SERV205

Group Interactions

(3,0) 3

This course is designed for the first-year resident advisors to develop a better understanding of self and others, particularly in regard to group responsibilities. There will be a three-day pre-fall orientation program. Group activities will be aimed at developing cohesiveness. Curriculum will increase awareness of group processes and interaction skills including: Leadership, referral, conflict resolution, assertiveness, crisis intervention, programming, empathy and active listening. Prerequisite: For first-year resident advisors only.

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SOCY101

Introduction to Sociology

(4,0) 4

This course introduces students to core sociological theorists and perspectives, including functionalism, conflict and symbolic interactionism, and familiarizes them with basic research designs, terminology and findings within the context of collective behavior and social movements.

SOCY102

Social Problems

(4,0) 4

An introductory to descriptions, theories, proposed solutions, and research methods for a variety of social problems including inequality, poverty, unemployment, environmental issues, family problems, and violence.

SOCY103

Cultural Diversity

(3,0) 3

This course introduces the student to racial, ethnic, gender and social class variation within the United States and the global community to enable the student to better understand, live with, and appreciate diversity.

SOCY113

Sociology of the American Family

(3,0) 3

A study of the development and change of the American family since 1890. This study will explore the impact of urbanization, industrialization, increased mobility, extended education and the changing status of women on the American family.

SOCY213

Introduction to Anthropology

(3,0) 3

A study of the evolution of humankind and the evolution and development of culture and society. Prerequisite: One introductory sociology course.

SOCY214

Criminology

(3,0) 3

A study of the nature and causes of crime and the results of various attempts to reduce crime.

SOCY225

Native Cultures of North America

(3,0) 3

A study of the Native American Indian and Inuit cultures of North America from earliest times to the present with emphasis on contrasting patterns of cultures. Also listed as NATV225.

SOCY226

Races and Minorities

(3,0) 3

Study of various social and ethnic minorities in the United States with an emphasis on Black/White relations. Competition, conflict and prejudice as they influence social and ethnic minority group relations. Social movements and their effects on majority, minority relations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SOCY227

Population and Ecology

(3,0) 3

Study of the basic issue of the world's population increase and distribution in relation to natural resources, standards of living, political systems, changes in physical and cultural environments.

SOCY238

Social Psychology

(3,2) 4

This course examines the social nature of humans, exploring both the influence of social structures upon behavior and the process by which people create social structures; explains symbolic interactionist theory; and introduces qualitative research methods which are applied in a field study conducted by the student. Prerequisite: SOCY101 with a grade of C or better, ENGL110, with a grade of C or better.

SOCY242

Sociology of Sex

(3,0) 3

Socio-psychological study of the impact of human sexuality upon human behavior.

SOCY299

Inuit Art and Culture

(3,0) 3

An examination of Inuit art and culture in the prehistoric, historic and contemporary periods.

SOCY301

Social Research Methods

(3,0) 3

Identification of research problems, concepts and theoretically derived hypothesis; Review of principle methods of experimental design, survey and field research and unobtrusive analysis. Prerequisite: Junior Status or Permission of Instructor.

SOCY302

Statistics for Social Science

(4,0) 4

The social foundation of statistical inference is discussed and elementary statistical concepts are introduced through numerical problems: Z scores, t-test, chi square, correlation, ANOVA, etc. Prerequisite: MA086 or equivalent/satisfactory score on ACT or Placement Exam.

SOCY310

Development of Sociological Theory

(3,0) 3

A critical analysis of the contributions to sociological theory by Comte, Spencer, Marx, Durkheim, Pareto, Weber and others. Prerequisite: SOCY238.

SOCY311

Contemporary Sociological Theory

(3,0) 3

Critical analysis of major sociological theories of the 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisite: SOCY310.

SOCY313

Work and Organization

(3,0) 3

Development and structure of the workplace; includes contemporary trends in formal organization and management styles, changing career patterns, sources of conflict and some cross-cultural comparisons. Prerequisite: Junior standing or three hours of sociology.

SOCY314

Social Change

(3,0) 3

Study of trends in industrial societies, theories explaining these changes, and the role of social movements in social change; focusing primarily on industrialized societies with some discussion of developing countries. Prerequisite: Junior standing or three hours of sociology.

SOCY321

Sociology of Women

(3,0) 3

This analysis of the roles and status of women in contemporary American society covers social structure, social psychology and social movements; also includes some cross-cultural comparisons.

SOCY325

Social Stratification

(3,0) 3

Class, caste, status, power, general concept of stratification and consequences of stratification will be related to social institutions.

SOCY326

The Sociology of Aging and the Aged

(3,0) 3

Examines aging and the aged in American society from the sociological perspective.

SOCY327

The Sociology of Dying and Death

(3,0) 3

Sociological examination of dying and death.

SOCY338

Deviance

(3,0) 3

Analysis of causes and consequences of deviant behavior and the development of deviant subcultures; examination of various societal responses to control deviance and their effectiveness. Prerequisite: Junior standing or three hours of sociology and/or human services.

SOCY339

Culture and Personality

(3,0) 3

Analysis of the role of culture in shaping personality using both contemporary industrial society and also cross-culture material. Prerequisite: Three hours of sociology or junior standing.

SOCY399

Sociology Junior Seminar

(1,0) 1

Students will develop a proposal for their senior project through lecture and discussion, mentoring by seniors, and collaboration with colleagues. Prerequisites: SOCY238, 304, 302, and SOCY/SOWK202.

SOCY401

Sociology Seminar I

(1,0) 1

Meetings provide instruction for the senior project covering locating sources, moving from theory to research, constructing a review of literature and designing methods. Prerequisite: SOCY399.

SOCY402

Sociology Seminar II

(1,0) 1

Class meetings provide instruction for the senior project, focusing upon designing and conducting research, analyzing data, completing final report, preparing poster and formal presentation. Prerequisites: SOCY401 and 495.

SOCY405

Seminar: Current Sociological Issues

(3,0) 3

Contemporary issues in sociology, to vary from year to year. Extensive reading, writing, and discussion expected. Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours in sociology. This course may be repeated when content varies.

SOCY490

Independent Research Topics in Sociology

(1-4) 1-4

This may take the form of either a research project or a program of directed reading on a specific topic. One to four credits over a period of one or two semesters may be granted according to the nature of the student's project. May be repeated to a total of six credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOCY495

Senior Project I

(0,6) 2

In this practicum, under the guidance of a Sociology faculty member, the student prepares a review of literature and research plan for an independent research project in Sociology. Prerequisite: SOCY399.

SOCY496

Senior Project II

(0,6) 2

In this practicum, under the guidance of a Sociology faculty member, the student refines the research plan prepared in SOCY495, gathers data, completes an analysis, writes up the findings, presents the study in a public forum and prepares a poster. Prerequisites: SOCY401 and 495.

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SOWK110

Introduction to Social Work

(3,0) 3

A general introduction and overview of the social work profession including its philosophy, values, professional roles, current trends and models in different practice settings (i.e. public welfare, child and family services, mental health, medical settings, etc.).

SOWK204

Fundamentals of Drug Abuse

(3,0) 3

Examines the pharmacology of commonly abused psychoactive and high-use drugs. Emphasizes the physiological effects of drug use and abuse. Topics include stimulants, depressants, opiates, hallucinogens, inhalants, cannabis, over-the-counter drugs, alcohol and drug testing. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL105 or equivalent.

SOWK250

Social Work Practicum

(1,9-27) 3-9

This course provides a field placement opportunity for students to practice skills and use knowledge gained from courses in skill minors. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit/No credit grade.

SOWK292

Substance Abuse: Prevention and Treatment

(3,0) 3

This course examines current prevention, detection and treatment approaches for substance abuse and addiction.

SOWK301

Alternative Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management

(3,0) 3

This course explores non-judicial avenues of dispute or conflict resolution such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration, as well as court-annexed alternative dispute resolution mechanisms. The procedural aspects, key elements, ethical considerations and practical applications of alternative dispute resolution are discussed as part of the dispute resolution landscape. The course will also include dispute resolution and conflict management simulations and case studies. Prerequisite: LAWS202 or junior standing. Also listed as LAWS301.

SOWK305

Tribal Law and Government

(3,0) 3

A study of tribal law which will explore such areas as the structure of tribal government; tribal sovereignty; treaties; civil and criminal court jurisdiction in Indian country; tribal resources; tribal economic development; taxation and regulation; rights of individual Indians; and various federal laws and court cases concerning and affecting tribes and their members. Prerequisites: HIST230 and NATV230. Also listed as LAWS305/NATV305.

SOWK310

Clinical Practice and Diagnosis

(3,0) 3

Student will learn skills in developing psychosocial history, treatment plans, becoming familiar with diagnostic criteria and categories, and appreciating the uses and limitations of various diagnostic schemes. Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of PSYC/SOWK201.

SOWK341

Addiction

(3,0) 3

Study of the nature of drug dependency with emphasis on social and cultural variations in patterns and consequences of use. Prerequisites: either junior standing or sophomore standing together with HMSV204.

SOWK344

Social Welfare Systems

(3,0) 3

Analysis of social welfare systems in the U.S. including history, philosophy, cross-cultural comparisons, and current issues. Prerequisites: Junior standing or completion of SOWK110 or completion of HMSV204

SOWK480

Grantwriting

(3,0) 3

This course gives advanced students experience in the research, writing and planning skills involved in preparing grant proposals for human service problems.

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SPAN161

First-Year Spanish I

(4,1) 4 fall

Introduction to basic Spanish grammar and vocabulary, designed to acquaint the student with the essentials of oral and written Spanish.

SPAN162

First-Year Spanish II

(4,1) 4 spring

Further study of Spanish grammar and vocabulary; emphasis on oral communication; reading of various materials in Spanish with the aim of understanding the meaning, enlarging the vocabulary and using Spanish for communication. Prerequisite: SPAN161 or equivalent.

SPAN165

Spanish for Public Safety

(4,1) 4 on demand

A continuation of SPAN161, with emphasis on vocabulary relevant to work in criminal justice. Prerequisite: SPAN161 or equivalent.

SPAN261

Second-Year Spanish I

(3,1) 3 fall

Intensive review of grammar and further vocabulary development. Emphasis on composition and conversation based on the reading of Spanish texts and newspapers. Prerequisite: SPAN162 or equivalent.

SPAN262

Second-Year Spanish II

(3,1) 3 spring

Conducted as much as possible in Spanish with the primary aim of dealing fluently with basic conversation situations. Prerequisite: SPAN261 or equivalent.

SPAN301

Study Abroad

(8,0) 8 summer

Students admitted by the faculty of the Spanish Department will take a variety of classes at an accredited institution in a Spanish-speaking country. Students will spend a minimum of 30 hours per week in class. They will also be required to visit sites for archaeological, historical and cultural importance. The students' work and progress will be monitored and evaluated by the LSSU Spanish Department in cooperation with the foreign institution. Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses of Spanish at LSSU and obtain the professor's permission. *Credit for this course may be applied to fulfill the requirements for a Spanish major or a Spanish minor. This course cannot be repeated.

SPAN361

Advanced Spanish Grammar

(3,0) 3

Acquisition of advanced skills in composition, grammar, reading and conversation, using media and readings related to the Hispanic world. Corequisite: SPAN262 or equivalent.

SPAN362

Advanced Spanish Composition

(3,0) 3

This course is designed to improve writing skills in Spanish through extensive and intensive reading of Spanish and Spanish-American fiction. Prerequisite: SPAN262. Corequisite: SPAN361.

SPAN368

Selected Topics in Conversation

(2,0) 2

Class assignments and readings provide the basis for in-class discussion at post-intermediate level. Students will be given the opportunity to practice vocabulary and grammar structures in life-like situations and contexts. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN380

Survey of Spanish-American Literature I

(3,0) 3

Class is a survey course of Spanish-American literature from the Spanish Conquest to 1880. It will cover readings from diverse genres and periods, beginning with an examination of precolumbian indigenous texts and ending with an overview of the development of modernismo. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN381

Survey of Spanish-American Literature II

(3,0) 3

Elective survey course of Spanish-American literature from 1880 to present day. It will cover readings from diverse genres and periods, beginning with an examination of modernismo, and culminating with selections from prominent recent literary works. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN401

The Spanish Novel

(3,0) 3

The class will focus on the study of selected 19th and 20th Century Spanish peninsular novels. Theme and content of course may vary from semester to semester. With the instructor's permission, this course may be repeated, and students may acquire up to six hours of credit for SPAN401. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN402

The Spanish-American Novel

(3,0) 3

This class will focus on the study of selected Spanish-American novels. Theme and content of course may vary from semester to semester. With the instructor's permission, this course may be repeated, and students may acquire up to six hours of credit for SPAN402. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN410

Spanish-American Civilization

(3,0) 3

This course will focus on the study of the history and culture of Spanish-America. The textbook will be supplemented with additional collateral readings; students will prepare both oral and written reports in Spanish on various assigned topics throughout the semester. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN411

Spanish Civilization

(3,0) 3

This course will focus on the study of the history and culture of Spain. The textbook will be supplemented with additional collateral readings; students will prepare both oral and written reports in Spanish on various assigned topics throughout the semester. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN412

Hispanic Literature of the Southwest

(3,0) 3

This course will examine the post-WWII development of Chicano culture in the southwestern United States as reflected through literature and the fine arts. Students will read a broad spectrum of popular Mexican-American literary works from 1945 to present day. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

SPAN490

Topics in Hispanic Literature

(1-4,0) 1-4

The content of this elective course will vary from semester to semester. Students may repeat SPAN490 once, and in so doing, acquire up to six hours credit for their degree plan with this class. Areas of study will include, but not be limited to, specific genres, periods, authors and literary movements. Prerequisites: SPAN361 and 362.

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THEA161

Problems in Speech/Drama

(1-3,0) 1-3

Practical problems in speech or theatre. Requires participation in forensics, debate, Reader's Theatre or theatre. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Prerequisite: COMM101.

THEA251

History of Drama and Theatre I

(3,0) 3

The study of the historical and esthetic drama and theatre from the Greek period to the European Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

THEA252

History of Drama and Theatre II

(3,0) 3

The study of the historical and esthetic drama and theatre from the Renaissance to current theatre and drama. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

THEA309

Speech and Drama Productions: (Topic)

(3,0) 3

Practical problems in the development and production of dramatic works, forensics workshops, tournaments and festivals. Course may be repeated one time (for a total of six credits) with a change in focus. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

THEA333

Studies in the Drama: The Genre and Theater in Context (Topic)

(3,0) 3

Students will examine theatre of a specific genre or genres in its social, cultural, political, and personal contexts. Course may be repeated one time (for a total of six credits) with a change of focus. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or Permission of Instructor.

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USEM101

University Seminar I: Foundations for Success

(1,0) 1

This course focuses on academic skills and critical thinking, on knowledge of the institution and the role of higher education, and on personal skills for living, which together are requisite for student success and lifelong learning. Seminar I - Foundations for Success places emphasis on incorporation into university culture, time management, use of campus resources, written and oral presentations, development of critical thinking skills, and strengthening study skills for academic success.

USEM102

University Seminar II: Developing Critical Thinking

(1,0) 1

Seminar II: Developing Critical Thinking continues the goals of Seminar I while placing emphasis on the application of critical thinking skills to the academic setting. A reading anthology is used as the basis for regular written, and oral communication and a term research paper. While continuing to apply skills and techniques used in Seminar I, students additionally develop cultural literacy and incorporate greater computer usage, and explore campus organizations, community events and community service.

USEM103

University Seminar III: Thinking About the Discipline

(1,0) 1

Seminar III: Thinking about the Discipline begins a more focused examination of the applications of critical thinking to the student's discipline. Each school selects a reading anthology suitable for analysis and discussion by its majors in order to examine such as current critical issues, social responsibility, ethics and cultural diversity from the perspective of the student's discipline. Continuing the activities of earlier seminars this course promotes ongoing participation in community events, application of academic success skills and writing in the discipline.

USEM104

University Seminar IV: Professional Seminar

(1,0) 1

Seminar IV: Professional Seminar serves as the fourth and final in the series and focuses on introducing the student to their discipline with special emphasis on interviews with professional, examinations of career options, and overviews of the literature and research of their discipline. This course focuses attention on the skills and knowledge base of the profession, features of the work environment, development of resume and career developing activities. Activities of earlier seminars continue as students apply critical thinking skills to the examination of the current literature of their field, participate in written and oral presentations, and hear presentations from working professionals.




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