Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
Related Sites

 

Alum Success

Rachael graduated from Novi High School in Novi, Michigan. Rachael completed their senior research project by developing a method of detecting blastomyces dermatitidis in soil using PCR. This study lays the foundation for further studying blastomyces dermatitidis in soil samples from endemic regions in northern Michigan. Rachael is a member of the Alpha Chi Honor Society. Rachael recently was selected to go to MSU to train in qPCR techniques and assisted in their cow bacteroides project. Rachael plans to attend graduate school in the future to study biochemistry.

Rachael Cunningham
2010 Outstanding Graduate
Forensic Chemistry

Department of Environmental Sciences

Facilities & Equipment

Chemical Instrumentation

 


GIS Lab

16 GIS workstations with Arc GIS 10.1 & 36 inch poster plotter


Professional GPS Hardware

 

Field Sampling Equipment

Van Dorn bottles, flow meters, Hydrolab multiparamer sonde, Ponar dredge, drum samplers, battery powered sampling pumps, etc.


Hiltunen Field Station

~40 Acres with shoreline on Sugar Island in the St. Marys River

Measure- ment of CI/LI Additive in Military Jet Fuel by Infrared Spectro- metry

Christine Larkin

The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing infrared spectrometry to measure Corrosion Inhibitor/Lubricity Improver (CI/LI) additive in military fuels. Four methodologies were evaluated, but only one methodology was found to be somewhat effective. The Direct Sample, Direct Sample with Standard Addition, and Concentrated Sample methodologies were ineffective. The Concentrated Sample with Standard Addition methodology was effective at correlating concentration and transmittance or absorbance within a single additive brand, but the correlation was not universally applicable across all CI/LI additive brands. It was also found that the absorbance variance of blank fuel samples completely encompassed the measurements of fuel with additives in them. This indicates that the instrument would be unable to accurately assess the concentration of CI/LI additive in a fuel sample of unknown CI/LI concentration. For this technology to be feasible, a different calibration curve would be needed for each commercial additive brand that the Army uses and it would only be capable of measuring additive concentrations as additive is being added to fuel or for the verification of additive injection equipment.

Apply Today!

Home » Department of Environmental Sciences > Facilities & Equipment
Share this page with your friends: