Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience. ANIMAL CARE at LSSU During the last quarter century, the momentum of discovery in the biological, behavioral, and medical science has steadily increased. The application of this new knowledge has brought valuable health benefits to humans. Laboratory animals have played an indispensable role in these advances and in the education of professionals who serve the medical and health needs of humans and animals. If the public’s rising expectations for relief from disease, disability, and premature death are to be realized, research involving laboratory animals must continue. Thus, significant responsibility for the management of laboratory animal resources falls upon individual investigators and faculty, as well as the institutions in which their research and instruction are performed.  All individuals who use animals in education or scientific inquiry, must understand and be committed to fulfilling the legal and moral responsibilities of such use for both ethical and scientific reasons.  Only healthy, well-cared for animals yield valid scientific data, and thus both practical and philosophical considerations demand the highest standards of care. The academic community has a responsibility for meeting two challenges.  First, it must assure that all animal facilities, as well as research and training procedures, are in compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and guidelines. Deficiencies in compliance with these standards only serve to undermine public confidence in all research and must be corrected.  Second, the academic community must educate the public about the important benefits derived from the use of animals in research and education. Investigator Responsibilities     Individual investigators who use vertebrate animals in their teaching or research (including those whose research consists of field work involving animals) are responsible, by law, for conforming to the basic regulations and policies governing animal use on the LSSU campus.  These regulations and policies cover: (a) the acquisition, care, and use of animals, (b) efforts to minimize animal pain and distress, (c) the training of personnel using animals, and (d) consideration of alternatives to animal use.  As a matter of educational policy, even faculty who do not themselves use animals should be aware of these regulations and policies as their students may use animals at a later time.  Similarly, instruction of students in proper animal use is an essential component of education in the biological sciences.