Redefining the Classroom

It is the mission of the fire science program faculty and staff to provide an atmosphere where active learning may occur, to provide students with the highest quality educational experience, to continue to support the “professional model” as currently utilized, to become appropriate role models for students, to support the educational program by acquiring the appropriate equipment and supplies, to fulfill the advising role, and to assess the academic outcomes of the program.

Program Objectives

  • Provide students with a broad-based, liberal education.
  • Provide students with the skills necessary to perform as twenty-first century criminal justice practitioners.
  • Assist students with their development of a set of professional ethics.
  • Assist students in the development of their critical thinking skills.
  • Assist students with the development of their writing skills.
  • Provide an educational atmosphere where active learning may occur.
  • Encourage life long learning.
  • Assess the educational outcomes of the program.

The fire science programs allow you a unique opportunity to receive state certification in a number of areas. You may obtain Firefighter I and II Michigan certifiability, and Wildland Firefighting certification (USFS S130, S190, and I220).

The following certificates may also be awarded: the Hazardous Material Awareness Level, Hazardous Material Operations Level, and the 40 hour Emergency Response Technician - HAZWOPER (29CFR 1910.120).

News

Fire science students learn the power of positive pressure


Lake Superior State University fire science students (from left) Christian Nagelvoort, Craig Suheski, and Jacob Herter queue a hose line into a practice building during an exercise at LSSU's fire practice grounds in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., on Sept. 24. Rescue Resources LLC of Grand Rapids provided training on how approach fires that tend to be very fluid, superheated, and explosive. Fire science students and faculty were joined by the Sault Ste. Marie city fire department for all day training. Crews practiced "positive pressure attack" techniques that blow heat out windows and allow firefighters to walk into a fire without taking a beating. The method also increases safety for trapped people. The Sault fire department — along with LSSU fire science faculty Terry Heyns and Roger Land — chipped in to help cover Rescue Resources' visit. Nagelvoort, Suheski, and Herter are all seniors from, respectively, Holland, Crystal Falls, and Ann Arbor, Mich.

 

Faculty Profiles

Roger Land

Assistant Professor, Fire Science

Professor Roger Land attained a B.S. in Sociology from Brigham Young University and an M.S. in Management/Manpower Planning from the University of Utah. He has served as Assistant Professor of Fire Science for the School of CJ/FS/EMS from 1996 to present.

Professor Land's field experience is expansive, and shows a diversified portfolio of expertise. From 1954-57 he served as a drafsman for North American Aviation in California and for the Water and Engineering Departments in Provo, Utah from 1969-72.

He served as a fire fighter in the City of Compton from 1957-65 and with the Los Angeles County Fire Department from 1965-69. Mr. Land held a military commitment with the United States Army from 1959-61 where he received an Honorable Discharge.

In 1974, Mr. Land served as State Director of Fire Fighter Training for Utah. He served as Chief for the Provo County Fire Department from 1974-76. He was also the Education and Training Specialist for the National Fire Academy from 1976-77.

Mr. Land was an Instructor of Fire Science for Provo Technical College in Weber County, Utah, Washington Technical Institute in Washington, DC, as well as Santa Ana Community College, West Los Angeles College, Rio Hondo College and Pepperdine College.

From 1978 to 1983, Mr. Land held the position of Coordinator (Assistant Chief) for the State of California, Fire/Rescue Division, Office of Emergency Services, Operations Coordination Center in Riverside, CA. He then advanced to Senior Coordinator (Deputy Chief), responsible for administration of southern section (12 counties) of the Fire/Rescue Division.

From July 1983 to September 1983, Mr. Land served as Administrative Officer (Assistant Chief) for Arabian Bechtel Company Limited , the Industrial Security Department, Jubail Al-Sinaiyah in the the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. He was later promoted to Group Manager (Chief).

From 1985 to 1987, Mr. Land served as Fire Marshal/Safety Specialist for Bechtel Construction, Inc., Intermountain Power Project in Delta, UT. From 1989 to 1992, he held the position of Supervisor for Centery Power Corporation, Springerville Generating Station, in Springerville, AZ.

In September 1992, he returned to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to hold the position of Director, Fire Protection Sercies (Chief) for Saudi Arabian Parsons Limited.

1) While overseas, what experiences were instrumental in shaping your views?

I went to Saudi Arabia twice, once for two years and again for nearly three years, with a 10 year period between the two assignments. I was naive and enthusiastic the first time and enlightened and pragmatic the second time. My advice boils down to research your assignment, move slowly, and act with tact and diplomacy.

2) What led you to the fire science field?

My father was a firefighter and he suggested that I take the entrance exam for the local fire department. I did, was hired and my brother did the same thing five years later. I served in various roles within the fire service for the next 40 years and as I turned into the cul-de-sac of life and my senior years came into view, I sent resumes out to every college or university I could find and Lake Superior State University responded.

During the 40 years of experience gathering I developed a love of teaching so I put the two together and functioned in that role for the better part of my adult life. I learned something just in time: do what you enjoy. Coming to LSSU was the best decision I ever made; I just wish I would have done it sooner.

3) What changes have occurred specific to the School of CJ/FS/EMS since you first arrived here?

Primarily growth: growth without appropriate reaction to deal with the influx of students and resulting equipment. There was an instant need to provided adequate space plus growing shortages of resources. The situation has been dealt with a temporary fashion but becomes more and more taxing.

Primarily growth: growth without appropriate reaction to deal with the influx of students and resulting equipment. There was an instant need to provided adequate space plus growing shortages of resources. The situation has been dealt with a temporary fashion but becomes more and more taxing.

We function under the concept of the "Professional Model" as outlined in the mission statement of our School. In doing so, we provide a combination of classroom and 'hands on' learning designed to prepare the student in the direction of leadership in the fire service. Our program falls between a fully academic degree and an academy training service.

5) What direction would you like to see the Fire Science program take in the next five years?

Accepting that the School of Criminal Justice, Fire Science and EMS are equipment driven programs is of critical importance. As such, there is a need for storage space, maintenance costs and replacement needs.

Accepting that the School of Criminal Justice, Fire Science and EMS are equipment driven programs is of critical importance. As such, there is a need for storage space, maintenance costs and replacement needs.

6) What makes for a good educator?

Generally speaking and in my opinion, a strong grasp of the subject matter, empathy, and a lot of patience with a touch of humor is required to be an effective educator. One should be able to respond to questions such as, "will that be on the exam" and "how long do I need to know that."

There are benefits that come with the job, that remain unnoticed. If one is attuned for the signs, a fleeting moment of joy can follow a student's painful, furrowed brow expression with a wide eyed look of understanding as a concept suddenly makes sense to them.

7) How can students prepare to be successful in both academia and the field?

Hard work, desire, and focus are essential preparations for success. Students should also seek to learn not just getting by. They will understand the secret when their "maturity switch" clicks on.