Lake Superior State University
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Alum Success

Maria DiValentin

"I chose to transfer to Lake Superior State University because of the personal attention I would receive. I did not want to attend a large university where I would be a number lost in the masses. The well-rounded curriculum allowed me to obtain my position at John Deere. Having a good balance of theory and hands-on knowledge is critical for my position and Lake State gave me a good foundation in these skills."

Maria DiValentin, Mechanical Engineering 2001
Field Service Representative,
John Deere Power Systems
Waterloo, IA

Parents at Lake State

“We have a choice about how we behave, and that means we have the choice to opt for civility and grace.”

  • Dwight Currie

Civility on Campus

Is “rude and crude” on its way out?

A culture of civility. What does that expression mean to you? Could it be a culture where:

  • People return shopping carts to the appropriate area instead of leaving them in the middle of a parking lot?
  • You regularly let others into lines of traffic?
  • A fellow passenger asks you what floor you need to go to and pushes the elevator button for you?
  • People don’t engage in complaint-fests?
  • Students don’t eat disruptively throughout classes or have numerous side conversations during meetings?
  • You get warning from the person in front of you before they lean their airplane seat back?
  • Rumors and gossip are not the norm?

An increasing number of campus conversations are centering on issues of civility. Faculty are concerned by student behavior in class and by students who “get in their face.” Rude comments and gossip circles concern students. Staff feel caught in the crosshairs of “supervisor bashing” or dealing with increasingly uncivil phone calls. In short, a growing culture of rudeness is a growing campus concern.

In his book, Choosing Civility (2002), Dr. P.M. Forni, the cofounder of the Johns Hopkins Civility Project and a professor of Italian literature at the university, explores not just manners or politeness but civility. “Being civil,” he writes, “means being constantly aware of others and weaving restraint, respect, and consideration into the very fabric of this awareness.”

Dr. Forni shares The 25 Rules of Considerate Conduct, many of which may seem like common sense yet offer a nudge for us all to be more civil beings. His rules include:

  1. Pay Attention
  2. Acknowledge Others
  3. Think the Best
  4. Listen
  5. Be Inclusive
  6. Speak Kindly
  7. Don’t Speak Ill
  8. Accept and Give Praise
  9. Respect Even a Subtle “No”
  10. Respect Others’ Opinions
  11. Mind Your Body
  12. Be Agreeable
  13. Keep It Down (and Rediscover Silence)
  14. Respect Other People’s Time
  15. Respect Other People’s Space
  16. Apologize Earnestly
  17. Assert Yourself
  18. Avoid Personal Questions
  19. Care for Your Guests
  20. Be a Considerate Guest
  21. Think Twice Before Asking for Favors
  22. Refrain from Idle Complaints
  23. Accept and Give Constructive Criticism
  24. Respect the Environment and Be Gentle to Animals
  25. Don’t Shift Responsibility and Blame

As more and more campuses embark upon formal or informal “civility campaigns,” chances are that they’ll end up becoming much nicer places to be.

Robotics...

Dereck Wonnacutt

Dereck Wonnacutt
Robotics and Computer Science

"Lake Superior State is the only robotics program of its kind in the country. I can work up any research or senior project idea with a professor or my advisor. I studied for a year in Japan through LSSU's connection with the Japan Center for Michigan Universities, and became fluent in Japanese. A Japanese company called Fanuc makes most of the robots in our lab. I'd like to roll my senior research project into a career with Fanuc that bridges the two countries and cultures."

Apply Today!

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