Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

"It seems like the more people I talk to, the more I realize just how good of an engineering program LSSU has. I appreciate your classes, your ability to make learning an enjoyable experience, and the hands-on attitude of LSSU as a whole. I am very glad I chose LSSU."

Jake Weinmann Controls Engineer, ADD Software/Fanuc Robotics

Manufacturing Engineering Technology

LSSU's Prototype Development Center puts manufacturing methods, mechanical services, materials testing, electronics, computers and robotics at a company's disposal so it can create functional prototypes of any product
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Your Career

With a Mechanical Engineering degree career opportunities are wide open including such areas as product design, component design, automotive systems design and testing, packaging and manufacturing design, process design, and product and/or process development.

Nearly 100-percent placement of graduates as engineers.

Student taking the robotics option you will find companies that are involved in robotics and automation specifically seek out LSSU graduates.

For those who take the vehicle systems option will be prepared for a future in one of the surface vehicle industries: Automotive, Rail, On-Highway (Heavy Trucks), Off-Road & Recreational, Agriculture & Construction, and other industries.

The Best Choice for Me

Erin (Skidmore) Madeline"Having grown up in Sault Ste. Marie, MI, I always knew that LSSU was a possibility for college, but I always wanted to go away to school. I attended the LSSU Women in Technology summer camp and was aware of the accredited engineering programs and the quality of the facilities. Even though I toured other universities where I had been accepted, none of them impressed me as much as LSSU, so I decided to give LSSU a try for a year.

Well, one year turned into more. I liked the small, historical campus so much that I decided to stay. LSSU had a lot to offer both in and out of the classroom. I participated in a variety of campus clubs and activities. I met a ton of great people, including my husband. My experience were so memorable, I wanted to maintain a relationship with LSSU and became a member of the4 Alumni Association Board of Directors.

The engineering programs have a variety of options from which to select. Class sizes are small and the faculty and staff are always willing to go that extra mile to help students. Coursework include a lot of hands-on lab work. And the senior year design project experience definitely prepared me for the "real world" of engineering.

Upon graduating with a degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, I earned a job as a Material Flow Engineer within the Material Planning & Logistics department of Ford Motor Company. Even though I did not have that specific training, the preparation I received from the classes at LSSU applied to my job far more. So much, that I was just recently asked to join the Premium Logistics Management team, another department within the MP&L organization."

--Erin (Skidmore) Madeline, '00
Material Planning & Logistics
Ford Motor Company


  

Whether it be a single gear or a complete automobile engine, the complete set of events that results in a finished product is planned and implemented by a manufacturing engineer. Once you graduate from LSSU, you will have many manufacturing career choices ranging from applied technical research to management of systems and personnel. Typical graduates have obtained engineering and technology positions in design of automated manufacturing systems, computer-aided design and manufacturing, quality control, robotics applications, automotive component manufacturing, design of manufacturing processes and equipment, maintenance, sales and management of manufacturing systems. Some graduates have also transferred to graduate schools to pursue master’s and doctoral degrees.

Employers
  • AAR Mobility Systems
  • Algoma Tubes
  • Applied Manufacturing Technologies
  • Automation Tooling Systems
  • Axxis Corporation
  • CTA Acoustics
  • Destaco Company
  • ESSAR Steel Algoma
  • Ford Motor Company - Material Flow Engineering
  • GE Engine Services
  • Graybar Electric
  • Halliburton
  • Honeywell - Technology Solutions Inc.
  • Hydro Automotive Structures
  • Interface Innovations
  • Johnson Controls
  • JR Automation
  • Kawasaki Robotics (USA), Inc.
  • Marathon Petro
  • Moran Iron Works
  • Reptron Mfg. Services
  • Robotek Contracting & Consulting
  • SCA Schucker
  • Schlumberger
  • Stryker
  • The Little Tikes Company
  • Walbro Engine Management

Alternative Management of Anaerobic Landfill Bioreactors for Improved Energy Potential

Josh Kuzimski

Converting municipal solid waste to usable energy is an emergent and growing method for modern waste management. Through microbial facilitation of methanogenesis, methane gas can be extracted from landfill bioreactors to yield a significant amount of usable energy. The hypothesis was that a sufficient addition of sodium acetate to a controlled bioreactor environment would promote larger growth of methanogenic microbes and subsequently promote a greater amount of methane relative to a control (Madigan et al, 2003). In order to simulate an anaerobic bioreactor environment, the method for the study took place in modular sections to cover the design, construction and operation of laboratory scale bioreactors. Upon completion of bioreactor engineering, the biological and chemical components were scrutinized to match ideal conditions of a landfill. Methanosarcina was the chosen genus of the methanogen family to seed the bioreactors, and a total elemental analysis of the waste source was analyzed to approximate methane yield. Over 557 hours, each bioreactor produced approximately 1.3 liters of biogas with less than 1% containing methane. Given analysis through gas chromatography, the bioreactors may have had stunted methane production do to presence of argon gas in the headspace and/or low C/N ratio of the waste. The presence of argon should have been replaced with nitrogen, and the waste source should have contained more carbon per nitrogen. The generation-3 design of constructed bioreactors was successful in containing all gasses, liquids, and solids internally, however did not produce enough methane biogas to accept or reject the hypothesis.

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