Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

“The material covered in LSSU's engineering program provided me a solid foundation for graduate studies. The systematic approach and communication skills needed to tackle engineering projects were taught and then practiced over and over again. In particular I appreciate the many hours spent by the faculty to develop oral presentation skills in each student. As a graduate student now, these skills have proven to be highly beneficial and, to my surprise, obviously not taught to the same extent at many other universities.”

Mark Reese, Mechanical Engineering 2005
Hawaii Natural Energy Institute
School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology
Graduate Student, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Mechanical Engineering

LSSU is 1 of only 3 universities in the U.S. with a robotics specialization at the undergraduate level
Facilities

Vehicle Systems Option

You'll learn how to project vehicle performance through analytical skills and computer simulation, how to test using modern instrumentation, and how to design for it using a perspective of the vehicle as a complete system. As you progress, you'll develop a competence with specific sub-systems and parts.


LSSU students test vehicle components in one of a variety of labs.

Robotics and Automation Option

Simulation and off-line programming (OLP) are valuable in teaching robotics courses and as a practical tool to show engineering and technology students how to design work cells using a computer.

The Robotics and Automation Laboratory has over $1 million in robotics equipment. Courses in systems integration and machine vision, automated manufacturing systems, and robotics engineering prepare you for robotics careers in the fields of applications, design, software, equipment development, and controls. Students work with Karel and V+ software, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), and application of C programming concepts.

    

From Robotic Simulation and Off-line Programming: From Academia to Industry, Robotics Online:

Professor Jim Devaprasad, Director of LSSU Robotics, says,

“Simulation and off-line programming (OLP) are valuable in teaching robotics courses and as a practical tool to show engineering and technology students how to design work cells using a computer. Students, while not hurting anything or anyone through the use of OLP and simulation, learn a great deal about robotic technology."

“Students like to see immediate results through watching a virtual robot. Students are as equally excited as using a simulated robot as when using an actual robot. We teach students how to develop code and see the results by animating the robot. Programming and learning robotics processes in a virtual world is an effective precursor to using an actual robot.”

“Using OLP and simulation in a demonstration opens prospective engineering students’ eyes and sparks interest in software and technology. Getting qualified people who understand both robotics hardware and simulation software in combination is a challenge for many engineering companies. Not many people are proficient at both, but our students are.”


Staubli and Adept robots share rotary index tables and a roller conveyor system in an L-line set-up controlled by V+ programming and PLCs.

Meet our Robots

  • Staubli: One of the fastest and most accurate articulated robots with six degrees of freedom.
  • Adept: Made by the only U.S. robot manufacturer and one of the most widely used selective compliance articulate robot arm (SCARA) type robots fitted with machine vision
    systems and cameras.
  • Fanuc: From the Arcmate family with six degrees of freedom built by one of the world’s largest robot manufacturers.
  • Motoman: One of the three largest robotics companies and one of America’s fastest-growing companies.

Chemistry and Environment

Our students will find themselves working in labs and in the field, in water and water pollution control, solid and hazardous waste, and environment systems analysis.

 

 

Deter- mination and Comparison of Ca:Zn and Ca:Fe Ratios in Conversion Coatings using SEM-EDS

Nathan Morrill

The purpose of this project was to determine optimum conditions for performing a surface analysis of conversion coatings using SEM-EDS in parallel to imaging. The desired Ca:Zn ratios across several varying acceleration voltages were measured and compared to Ca:Fe ratios to observe if increased kV resulted in increased Fe detection and subsequently lowered to undetectable levels of desired analytes.

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