Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Video at ABC.com

Ariel Kelly, a Park and Recreation graduate who is a park ranger at Yosemite National Park, was interviewed as part of a program feature that highlights beautiful places in America.

Parks & Recreation

Parks & Recreation Management challenges the mind and body
Facilities

LSSU's unique natural location provides an opportunity for our students to work directly in an environment that mirrors that of many careers.

For example, the LSSU Recreation Club (right) provides hands-on experience to those in the Parks & Recreation program.

Dan Wydra, a 1989 LSSU parks and graduate and chair of recreation board for Gladstone, MI, contacted Professor Sally Childs with a proposal to do a site assessment and create a recreation land use plan for Gladstone’s Van Cleve waterfront park. The plan would serve as a framework for the park’s current management and future development.

Wydra was familiar with Lake Superior State’s Parks & Recreation program from personal experience, and knew that this type of land use planning was part of the curriculum.

“The possibilities excited me, so I e-mailed Gladstone Recreation Director Nicole Sanderson and confirmed our interest in getting involved,” says Childs.

Recreation club members have completed three land-use plans for Van Cleve Park, using data provided by Sanderson. Students applied their GPS and GIS skills to create a very accurate map, part of a final product the club submitted to Gladstone last week.

“Each of the three composite plans we submitted has three interchangeable elements that allows planners to mix and match recreational activities the city may want to support through the Van Cleve area,” says Childs. “Hopefully the recreation board will find our ideas appropriate and submit our recommendations to Gladstone’s city commission for final funding.”

 

Optim- ization of Salmon DNA as an Internal Standard for qPCR

Elaina Murray

The Escherichia coli species is a human fecal contamination indicator and as such is used in beach monitoring efforts. Quantifying E. Coli presence in local beach waters helps the health department determine if a beach should be closed. The current method of determination, Colilert, takes 18 hours to produce data. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), which measure genetic DNA, is also method used to quantify the number of E. Coli, but it can be done much faster than Colilert. In order to standardize the qPCR results, an internal standard is included which is salmon DNA. This project goes through the process of optimizing the salmon standard curve. Each of the components was modified and the resulting standard curve was analyzed for improvements; the primers and probe were purchased new and the concentrations were varied, the DNA was purchased new and the standard curve concentrations and dilution methods were varied, the DNA was cleaned with a Qiagen kit, and new master mix and bovine serum albumin were purchased and prepared. We found that changes to the concentrations of primers and probe and cleaning the DNA showed an increase of optimization, and that changing the dilution methods had no effect of optimization. A combination of the above modifications may be able to produce an optimized salmon DNA standard curve.

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