Superior Simulation Center Workshop(Download image)

GETTING SEPSIS SAAVY – Lake Superior State University lead simulation specialist Judy Hering, right, introduces an emergency scenario during a workshop conducted at LSSU’s Superior Simulation Center on Aug. 4. Nurses, doctors, and health practitioners from six regional hospitals tapped the Center’s robotic patients, clinical stations, and staff to learn how to detect sepsis emergencies. Sepsis is an immune response to a bacterial infection that gets into the blood that often leads to organ failure or death. Up to one million people are hospitalized each year for sepsis, making it one of the top ten diseases driving mortality in America. LSSU’s Superior Simulation Center collaborated with the Michigan Health and Hospital Association (MHA) Keystone Center in offering the daylong training. (LSSU/John Shibley)

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GETTING SEPSIS SAAVY – Janis Bishop (center) and Jori Pollard listen to colleague Jeanette Rokop during a workshop hosted at Lake Superior State University’s nursing simulation center in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., on Aug. 4. The three – from McLaren Northern Michigan Hospital in Petoskey – joined 25 nurses, doctors, and health practitioners from six regional hospitals for the daylong clinic on how to read the signs of and treat sepsis emergencies. Sepsis is the body’s immune response to a bacterial infection that gets into the blood. It often leads to organ failure or death. Up to one million people are hospitalized for sepsis each year, making it one of the top ten diseases driving mortality in America. LSSU’s Superior Simulation Center offered realistic robotic patients for the workshop, presented under the auspices of the Michigan Health and Hospital Association (MHA) Keystone Center. (LSSU/John Shibley)

Contact: John Shibley, 906-635-2314, (jshibley@lssu.edu)